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Cutting trees wider than the bar length

panamamike

panamamike

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After doing some searching, I found a government link with general chainsaw safety information.

One thing they mentioned that I was looking for was the limit of how big a tree you could fell given a particular bar length. They mentioned a chainsaw can safely cut down a tree with a trunk diameter up to 2x the bar length.

Question is, how do you do that exactly? Are there any training videos showing techniques on how to do this?

My concern is where does the tip of the saw go when the tree is wider than the bar.

Regards,

Mike
 
Adkpk

Adkpk

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I once cut a 36" dia white ash with a 20" bar. I was a bit concerned but it worked without any problem. First I cut a notch one side then the other being careful to meet the cuts. The wedge came out without a problem. I then took a short break to build confidence and focus in case I needed an escape. I cut one side within two inches of the back of the face cut and switched over to the other side and did the same. Back and forth slowly but surely and eventually it fell. I have a video of it falling but not the cutting I was alone and actually had time to walk over to the video camera to start taping before it came down. It fell on a dime, too. I would love to post the vid but haven't the skill to get it on the computer, someday I'll get it on here.
 
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panamamike

panamamike

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Thanks for sharing

Luckily I don't have to deal with a standing tree. It's already on the ground, but wanted to make sure I cut it the safe way.

After getting feedback and hearing about the fan cut, I did a search and found mention of the sectioning method in a Stihl safety manual.

Unfortunately, it's a bit confusing to follow, I think I have the idea, but would be nice to see a video of it in action.

Regards,

Mike
 
panamamike

panamamike

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Look at this YouTube video to see slides and video of the process to cut the center out of a tree too large for your saw. It is easy if you understand how to start a bore cut. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuHSDHavNN0
I appreciate the input, this is good stuff. However, I was hoping to find an example of a technique not using a bore or plunge cut. From what I've read, this requires someone with experience.

Regards,

Mike
 
Metals406

Metals406

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I appreciate the input, this is good stuff. However, I was hoping to find an example of a technique not using a bore or plunge cut. From what I've read, this requires someone with experience.

Regards,

Mike
Hey Mike, no offense man... But if you aren't comfortable or skilled enough to use a plunge cut... You probably shouldn't be falling anything bigger than 12" DBH anyway. Little trees are dangerous enough--the big ones will make you real dead, fast.

Find a local logger, line clearing crew, or someone that has experience... And ask for help. Ask them to come over on a Saturday, and show you some technique... Let them know you'll provide the steaks and beer when you're done. :cheers:
 
madhatte

madhatte

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I do almost everything with a 20" bar. Plunge/bore cuts, fan cuts, and rips make it work. The trick is to get the most out of your saw. Usually I'm behind a MS361. Sometimes I use an 044. Either way, I like the shorter bars better than the longer ones. Falling, I'm seldom touching anything better than 30". Bucking, I get into 72" from time to time. Either way, I prefer the better power, responsiveness, and maneuverability of shorter bars to the reach of longer ones. Maybe it's just a phase. I dunno.
 
vaclimber

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I do almost everything with a 20" bar. Plunge/bore cuts, fan cuts, and rips make it work. The trick is to get the most out of your saw. Usually I'm behind a MS361. Sometimes I use an 044. Either way, I like the shorter bars better than the longer ones. Falling, I'm seldom touching anything better than 30". Bucking, I get into 72" from time to time. Either way, I prefer the better power, responsiveness, and maneuverability of shorter bars to the reach of longer ones. Maybe it's just a phase. I dunno.
I can def finitely relate bro. I used to keep the 16" bar on my 20T in the tree thinking it was to my advantage, but the 14" is the way to go for surety of release when I want it to. I don't rope out a lot of the stuff I was hesitant to "finesse" with the boggable 16". I have to add though, safetywise(especially when felling) the prefferred situation is a bar longer than the diameter of the tree.
 
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ChainsawmanXX

ChainsawmanXX

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cut down a 42" white oak with a 046 with a 24" bar Pulled just fine through it first i made my face-cut, Bored in the middle to the sides of the hinge and walk her around :D always works for me!
 
T0RN4D0

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Actually for felling you can drop a tree almost 3 times the size of your bar. For bucking you need at least half the length to get through. We dropped a 50" with a 20" bar and a 50+ that was hollow. Asked a friend that has more experience because it isn't the kind of tree I want to learn on. Firewood supply for a whole year from 2 trees like that tho. :)

Bucking was a whole other problem because the bar didn't come through, had to split it and take it out in sections.. Have another one waiting already dropped but got proper equip now and shouldn't be a problem :D
 
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Huskybill

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I always used a longer bar when I could. I’m not fond of the hang time when she’s half knotched while walking around it to complete the other half of the knotch.
Weird things can happen like a hollow inside tree. The knotch was solid wood while the back half was hollow inside. No appearance on the outside of it being hollow inside. The barber chair happened very quickly. Luckily it was a smaller tree. Then I’m not sure what happened with a tall 20” diameter trunk oak tree. I must of been lined up with the natural crack perfectly. On the back cut she barber chaired on me. The wood was solid inside. It was very cold I was using a 24” bar.
 
Ted Jenkins

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Actually for felling you can drop a tree almost 3 times the size of your bar. For bucking you need at least half the length to get through. We dropped a 50" with a 20" bar and a 50+ that was hollow. Asked a friend that has more experience because it isn't the kind of tree I want to learn on. Firewood supply for a whole year from 2 trees like that tho. :)

Bucking was a whole other problem because the bar didn't come through, had to split it and take it out in sections.. Have another one waiting already dropped but got proper equip now and shouldn't be a problem :D
My biggest tree ever was 9' and I used a 48'' bar because that is what I had. If no can figure out how to drop a 50'' tree with a 20'' bar they are in the wrong field. It can be done safely if one plans and uses their head. Thanks
 
Haironyourchest

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The problem is getting the cuts to meet up inside the stem. Only comes with experience, or maybe born talent. Not super crucial on a regular tree, but if there's any added risk factors - lean, compromised wood, terrain etc, mismatched cuts are just adding another thing to go wrong. Hinge wood has to be as good as possible. Easy to ace the hinge if you can see the nose of the bar sticking out the other side of the tree.
 
pbilly

pbilly

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if you dont know what you are doing ya probably shouldnt be cutting any trees down that are bigger than your bar. when things go wrong they go really wrong really fast
 
madhatte

madhatte

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Necropost is an opportunity to look back. Nowadays I mostly run a 28" but I have both shorter and longer bars and they all have their place... except a 20". I don't know what that thing is for at all.
 
pbilly

pbilly

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i have a 20 inch bar on my 357 xp I really only use it for climbing although i dont really climb all that often any more. if im working on the ground i use my 32" on my 372 xpw i dont have to bend down and can make short work of most trees.
 
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