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Does anyone here use a one angle for all purpose?

Discussion in 'Milling & Saw Mills' started by Brent Nowell, Jul 11, 2019.

  1. Brent Nowell

    Brent Nowell ArboristSite Operative

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    sometimes I just don’t have the time or patience to switch to a killing chain from the cross cut...

    I use 5 degree angle for milling, and I use a 30-35 degree for crosscut..

    Was curious, has anyone tried to meet in the middle at say like 10-20 degrees for use on both applications?

    Just wondering if say 15 degrees would be low enough for small milling jobs, but yet high enough for cross cut felling?

    I ask because when I’m camping I always grab firewood but sometimes make Swedish rocket stoves, a couple of chairs to sit on etc. Instead of switching chains, do you think this is a good idea?
     
  2. Rob Stafari

    Rob Stafari ArboristSite Operative

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    I use the same square ground chain for milling that I do for everything else. Might not end up as smooth, but it cuts faster and any slabs I use are going on the router sled anyways.
     
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  3. rarefish383

    rarefish383 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I use Stihl RS chain out of the box for every thing. If you look at the post "Red Oak", just above, you can see a couple live edge mantles I milled. They are smoother than a lot of pics that get posted of slabs milled with ripping chain. I've found that the biggest killer to the finish is rocking forward and back, and stopping and starting. Every time you stop, when you start back up, you leave a mark. I set my mill on the guide with the tip slightly forward of the cut, so that end of the bar enters the cut first. Keep it at that angle all the way through the log, so the tip comes out of the cut first. If you have to rock back and worth to make the cut your saw is way dull. Keep the bar at the same angle start to finish.
     
  4. BobL

    BobL No longer addicted to AS

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    Yep, Yep and Yep.

    Once I start I don't stop cutting till I finish the cut. - I use log rails for every cut so there's a "gap" between the mill and the top of the log, Before I start I place a hammer and scatter wedges along the top of the log in the "gap". The saw has a lockable throttle and the logs are usually on a slope so if I let the mill go the saw still cuts. Usually I keep fwd pressure on the mill with my hip or thigh and this frees up my hands to add wedges etc.
     
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  5. Brent Nowell

    Brent Nowell ArboristSite Operative

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    The problem I have with the higher angle chain is the heat generated, for me they seem to stretch all the time cause of the heat factor.
    Not stopping during a mill cut can be tough for me, but yes I have noticed the finish will change when changing bar angle and or stopping.

    Personally I have noticed cut times are lower, heat is lower, and finish is smoother with a 5 degree angle..
     

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