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Echo cs-800p

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by Idahonative, Dec 9, 2015.

  1. Idahonative

    Idahonative Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Have decided to start a thread dedicated to the Echo cs-800p since there is very little information out there on this saw. I also want to be able to add to the discussion without cluttering up someone else's thread. I was planning to run this saw with just a MM and tune but have changed my mind. I am cutting and pasting some posts into this thread to get it started:

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    Was planning on running it with just a MM and tune but have now changed my mind. The 800p is so new, there isn't much info out there on it. Yes, it's a revised cs8000 but it appears Echo has re-designed the top end. Reports on the 8000 are typical of Echo: TORQUEY, and will run close to the 90cc's with basic mods. The 800p should only be better.

    Unfortunately, I'm not going to get any time on the saw since it now has an appointment in March
    :). I decided on getting it ported after doing what little research I could. Now don't hold me to this because, as of now, it's all speculation but...I think the 800p may very well have a chance of performing above the level of a stock 661 or 390xp. At least that's my hope...if it doesn't turn out that way, oh well, nothing lost. I will still have a saw capable of taking care of the big stuff when it comes along.

    Interesting, when looking at:

    cs800p: PHO: 16 lb, 8 oz. Fuel: 28.9 oz. Oil: 14.1 oz. TTL: 19.18 MSRP: $829.99

    390xp: PHO: 16 lb, 6.8 oz. Fuel: 30.43 oz. Oil: 16.91 TTL: 19.38 MSRP: $1,120.00

    ms661: PHO: 16 lb, 11.2 oz. Fuel: 27.9 oz. Oil: 12.2 TTL: 19.20 MSRP: $1,289.95

    I'm sure I will get flamed for even mentioning the 800p in the same sentence as the 390xp and 661. But, the truth is (to my knowledge), no one really knows. The 800p is new and hasn't been looked at in this way. Like I said, if it doesn't work out like I think it might, nothing lost.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Found a post about porting the cs-8000 from a member named Chainsawbob1 back in 2005:

    "I've had two of them done at Greffards shop. They now turn 15,400rpm's no load. With the stock 36" bar, full comp chisel bit chain and cross cutting a 34" dia. fir log it turns 7000rpm's and cutting nice. When I sent them to Dennis I told him I wanted a very workable (not limited time use) saw that would keep up with a stock 066 magnum. It surpasses that request. Good job."

    No way of knowing if what he says holds any truth though. Anyway, this is the start and if anyone feels like they have input, feel free to share.
     
  2. Warped5

    Warped5 WingNut

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    I think @leeha may have info to contribute ...
     
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  3. Four Paws

    Four Paws Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I would say the manual override oiler is a great feature. I think the 800/8000 echo would make an excellent milling saw.

    Is the newest version rpm limited? EPA carburetor?
     
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  4. Idahonative

    Idahonative Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I believe it is unlimited. Not sure what's in the carb. I thought the same thing about the milling.
     
  5. Four Paws

    Four Paws Addicted to ArboristSite

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    You own one, right? What model carb is on it? Fully adjustable? Limiters? Special adjustment tool necessary?
     
  6. Idahonative

    Idahonative Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I guess I should have mentioned the saw is not in my possession yet.
     
  7. JeremiahJohnson

    JeremiahJohnson Redneck Chainsaw Repair

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    New ones quads with domed piston. Older singles with flat top.

    I have all the carb info saved too on another site. Dont feel like looking up the old info already posted awhile back though.
     
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  8. CoreyB

    CoreyB Addicted to ArboristSite

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    :thisthreadisworthlesswithoutpictures: and videos
     
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  9. Idahonative

    Idahonative Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Interesting comments from the past but not much on porting:

    @mountainlake:
    "Just take the rakers down a bit to take advantage of the the torque , my CS8000 is only 1 or 2 seconds behind my 385xp in a 20 second cut which it shoud be, both stock Yes it wieghts to much but it's the same as my 385xp full. Steve"

    "About 3 years ago I ran my CS8000 against one of my 044 saws , in bigger wood the 044 took 19 seconds , the CS8000 took 14 seconds. Same results yesterday with brand new chiesel chain off the same roll, in smaller wood they were about even. Also ran the CS8000 against my 385xp and Dolmar 7900 , at the best about a 2 second difference in a 20 second cut. Steve"


    "My 8000 turns way slower than my 385xp, cuts almost as fast with the proper chain. Wieghts the same on a good scale. Steve"


    @JeremiahJohnson:
    "The JD 800 = 8000 I have IMO will cut with any pro saw in it's cc size. Most times this echo built saw will out cut them with it's tighten squish and 195psi.
    Only draw back of the 8000 IMO is the PHO weight is right close to a 066 660 weight. But if you can get a used one for the right money do it. But if buying new I would get a lighter saw JMO."



    @zogger:
    "I had a buncha saws stolen last year..and I miss the cs8000 the most. I only ran it with a 36 in big wood and it did just fine, and it had a superb auto oiler plus a manual oiler button. Easy to start, pulls chain and won't quit.

    In factamundo, I am still splitting big rounds I cut with that saw.

    Only negative I can think of is, apparently no full wrap handlebars for them.

    If I still had it, it would be at the top of my list to get ported, as well."


    @rmh3481:
    "Ive done some work with them. I also heard that Echo hired a couple of two stroke builders to give them some input on their next generation of saw engines. Ed Heard did a 680 and Walkers did an 8000 but it looks to me like this one is quickest;"
    ECHO CS8000 HOT TUNE PIPE - YouTube
     
  10. Cliff R

    Cliff R Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I have owned two of the big Echo's, along with two CS-670's and one CS-6700. None of them are still in my line-up. I found the larger Echo saws to be OK for power production, but they did not have a broad/flat power curve as one would have expected from them. Since I was comparing them to my large Husqvarna Pro saws they simply didn't make the grade, so they went on down the road.

    I found the CS-8000 to be heavy, lack-luster for power (decent but certainly not overly impressive anyplace), and it had a crappy air filter design. You also had to remove a tiny rubber cover to access the carburetor L/H screws, which I thought was a poor set-up, as it had to be put back in each time to test it in the cut or it would suck in dust/dirt/wood chips, etc. Nearly as I can remember they oiled the bar/chain all the time as well, not only when the chain clutch was moving like my Husqvarna pro saws do.

    Not trying to paint a big black cloud over that line of saws, I actually love my Echo power equipment and have had next to zero issues with any of it. I simply found that the larger Echo saws, or at least the ones I owned and used, didn't compare to the Husqvarna pro saws I own in that same cc range.

    In contrast, the smaller ones, specifically the CS-510 with nothing more than a simple muffler mod is a BEAST for 50cc.

    Hopefully the newer version(s) of the CS-800 have improvements to the P/C and improved power to weight ratio.......Cliff
     
  11. Idahonative

    Idahonative Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Hey, I appreciate your honesty. This 800p is more of an experiment than anything. I'm not afraid to swim against the current even though sometimes I end up far down the river:). The question on the 800p is: Can a woods port make it run like a 390xp or 661? I haven't found any proof that it can or can't. I've been needing a bigger saw for some time so even if this experiment is a flop, I'll still have a saw that handles bigger stuff when it comes along.

    Just curious, had your previously owned 8000 had anything done to it? MM or tab delete or just stock?
     
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  12. bryanr2

    bryanr2 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    looks like they got potential.:drinkingcoffee:
     
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  13. Cliff R

    Cliff R Addicted to ArboristSite

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    "Just curious, had your previously owned 8000 had anything done to it? MM or tab delete or just stock?"

    Mine were completely stock, not even muffler modded.
    The CS-6700 was completely rebuilt with a new OEM P/C, and it was the most disappointing of the bunch. I found that saw to have a very narrow power range, and stalled against the clutch WAY too easily for my liking. This was with a 24" bar, so I went to a 20" and it was better. Compared to my Husqvarna 268XP it was a complete "turd", so I NEVER found myself reaching for the Echo for an outing.

    I cut a LOT of firewood, and heat my shop and house with it for over 15 years now. I also work on power equipment for a living. I'm not brand specific about any of this stuff, and always try to provide unbiased information if/when I post on these things.

    I have watched Echo continue to make improvements to their saws clear back to the EVL units. I actually purchased a new 500EVL way back in the early 1980's, and quickly replaced it with the 480CD that I still own and use today. Echo also made some reed-valve engine models up thru the years, then started using piston/porting and upright P/C's. I've owned just about every single one of them at one point or another, CS-300, CS-360T, CS-370, CS-400, CS-440, CS-510, CS-520, CS-670, CS-6700, CS-800.

    The little reed valve models are extremely underpowered everyplace. Most of the others that are CAT equipped respond very well to muffler mods, as does the CS-440/510/520's.

    I never port any of these engines, not into that sort of thing. I simply think that the science of porting is best left to folks who have considerable time/experience and make accurate comparisons, keep good records, and really know when they are helping these engines out/making improvements to them.

    With all this said, and what I know about these things today, if I were starting from scratch, and needed a good saw line-up, it would consist of three or four Echo saws from about 40cc thru 60cc, one would be a top handle. The CS-620PW would for sure be one of those saws, and I'd probably compliment it with a 40cc and 50cc offering to fill the gaps. Since most of the big trees are gone from these parts, and 99 percent of my cutting is tops left over from logging operations, there is no need for anything bigger than 60cc these days.

    One might ask why I would go Echo instead of sticking with the big names. The answer is simple, I can get professional grade equipment that will make good power, dead solid reliable, last for decades, and buy in cost 2/3rd of the competition.

    Sorry to be so long winded, but for the topic at hand, I'm absolutely certain with correct porting and other modifications, your Echo CS-800 endeavor will be a great success, and you will learn a lot and have some fun along the way.......Cliff
     
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  14. Idahonative

    Idahonative Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I've probably read nearly all of your past Echo posts and I agree, you are straight shoot'in and unbiased. I really enjoy reading your posts because you have different experiences/perspectives and call it like you see it.

    I am a little surprised you hadn't tried MM'ing all of your Echo's from the past since we all know how stuffed up they come from the factory. I read what a fan you were (and still are) of the cs-510 with a MM:
    "...specifically the CS-510 with nothing more than a simple muffler mod is a BEAST for 50cc".

    I own that saw and totally agree with your assessment...it is a great little saw. But even as big a fan as I am of the 600 series Echo's, their performance out of the box is just "good". A MM and tab delete, however, makes them a great saw. Knowing what I know about Echo and their stuffed muffs, I would have a hard time running one without a MM and tune.
     
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  15. Cliff R

    Cliff R Addicted to ArboristSite

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    "I am a little surprised you hadn't tried MM'ing all of your Echo's from the past"

    I didn't muffler mod the 670's or 800's as they really aren't all that restrictive like the later models that use the CAT's in them.

    One has to be careful with those sort of things, or you end up with a LOT of noise and no more if as much power as you started out with. I also use saws for firewood cutting, not to impress anyone other than myself.

    I can tell anyone reading this for absolutely certain, in "stock" form a Husky 262XP or 268XP is a LOT more saw than a CS-670/6700 Echo. In the same sentence, they all cut firewood just fine. What used to really piss me off about the Echo's, at least with those models, is that they lacked the broad/smooth power curve and strong top end power of the XP Husky's. I found the power curve to be "raspy", narrow, and they stalled very easily against the clutch if the operator allows them to fall out of the "good power".

    All that may be a completely different deal with some modifications and correct porting, and I'm looking forward to reading about your improvements......Cliff
     
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  16. yamess191

    yamess191 ArboristSite Operative

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    Let me start out by saying I dont post here much, I do buy and sell saws here but rarely participate in the threads, but I do enjoy reading them. I saw that this was about a saw that I happen to have some experience with professionally.
    I do tree work on my weekends and have always burned wood for heat. I have ran just about every size professional grade Stihl and Husqvarna on the job and at home. I have also used Redmax and Echo though only a few models.
    I have a Echo CS 8000 with a new style piston and cylinder in it. It also has been ported by a friend. Without the port job the saw was heavy and had lackluster power. Just as a few others have said, its power curve was rather narrow, and it was hard to keep it in the sweet spot. It also vibrates a little worse than a modern Stihl or Husky. Compared to my 372XPW or 575XP which both are stock it seemed like a dog. My friend's port job really did wake this saw up. Now it revs more freely, has power across the rpm's instead of a narrow window and holds RPM higher in the cut. It will barely out cut my stock 372XPW.
    I plan on using this as my small milling saw because of the manual oiler and the fact that it is heavier than my other go to saws in this cc size (372 xpw and 575xp). I got mine for a song and a dance off of my local craigslist with a bad piston and cylinder, so I really dont have more than $300 into mine, plus I bet it had less than a hour on it when I bought it.
    With all that said, I would not buy one of these saws to run stock. They are a dated design with rubber anti vibe mounts, mostly aluminum instead of plastics wich make them a little heavy, and really chocked up motor stock. I would spend the extra on a husky 372 or 385 or a stihl 460 or 650 and have almost a hot rod out of the box.
     
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  17. Idahonative

    Idahonative Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Are you saying your cs8000 is the same saw as the 800p?
     
  18. yamess191

    yamess191 ArboristSite Operative

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    I dont know if it is the same saw.... but judging by the pics on echo's website they didn't change the body of the saw at all, though I have not looked up the part #s and compared. I do know that the cylinder and piston that I bought according to a representative at echo was the most recent version as of 6 months ago. So unless they redesigned the piston and cylinder again, I would bet mine is exactly the same.
    I failed to mention that I had a newer version of the CS 8000 also that I gave to my buddy who ports my saws for me, and it was exactly the same as mine, except piston, cylinder and it was grey not orange. I would love to see a CS 800 in person, but none of my dealers would stock a saw like that, this is Stihl and Husqvarna country out here.
     
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  19. Idahonative

    Idahonative Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Looks like I might be trying to turn a Pinto into a Porsche...LOL. Oh well, the saw is paid for and the port date is set...can't turn back now. This thread may end up being a good Saturday Night Live skit though:). At any rate, I'm thick skinned and ready for any deserving "punishment".
     
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  20. yamess191

    yamess191 ArboristSite Operative

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    Don't get me wrong, it is a good saw, I just think for professional use it is a little under powered, heavy and a dated design. I like all pro grade saws, some are just a little more refined than others.
     
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