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Firewood splitting injury...(stupidity)

MartDalb

MartDalb

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Joined
May 22, 2017
Messages
660
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Denmark
When I was 12, my dad wouda taped that up and said, now git back out there & finish that pile!

Yeah, I did think about it, but I had to pinch it for 20min to stop the bleeding.
Easier to get stitched and move on :laugh:

And, making these threads is, I guess, to try and make sure less people get hurt.
This wound will heal up fast, but a few inches upwards and my toes woulda had it worse.
 

Wow

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Dec 23, 2017
Messages
706
Location
Louisiana
Guess it was my turn to be a dumbass.....

Axe slipped on an edge and went across my foot.
Wear safety shoes and don't fu...around, even when it is just 20minutes of splitting wood.

4 stitches and a few weeks rest

Stay safe everyone! :cheers:
So sorry! I wear Steel toe boots but they might not have helped here. I ABSOLUTELY will NOT have a double bit axe on my property. Here's why. They scare the crap out of me. I was raised splitting firewood and my story will blow your mind. We Coon hunted at night and after working and saving I was able to buy a miners Lamp and cap. We are talking around 1957 ish. Batteries were out of my budget but a can of carbide could last longer so it was my choice. The light made a flame. Water in a top tank, dry carbide bottom tank light the flame and you could barely see at night but I got by. The cap had a metal lamp holder riveted to the top of the bill bent up and lapped slightly over the top. Dad had dropped me off in the woods alone. Hell at 10 or 11 we worked like men. So in a while I decided to stick the Axe in the top of the stump. Wham! I hit that stump and BOUNCE back up flew the axe. It was like hitting rubber. A couple more tries and because I don't give up I was determined by gosh to drive that axe blade into the stump. This time I took a deep breath, let it out and gave that axe pure hell from a little boy who thought he was a man.
BAM then Bounce up and BAM right into my forehead.
The hit made me blink. Realized I was hit hard by the other sharp side of the axe I just dropped the axe and sat on that stump. After blinking and thinking I just knew my head must be laid open so I removed my cap and felt of my head. Had a knot but no blood. I picked up my cap and saw the Lamp holder was mangled. In fact it had kinda wrapped around the axe blade. There was a cut on part of the bill not protected by the metal. That cap might have extended my life. After that I would purposely dull one blade of the axe. I never told Dad. He was a slave driver. He'd have beat me. I'm 74 and still working. He probably did me a favor. I was never coddled. Can't much remember being a boy. Hard work is all I ever knew and somehow it makes a man feel better. I've got lots of scars but scars are for survivors. Take it easy. You learned from this. You'll be a better man for it. They need to build metal protectors for Boot tops. When I run my wood splitter I wear Shin Guards right on my boots. Had gloves on and still lost a finger nail a few months ago. Good luck.
 
MartDalb

MartDalb

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Joined
May 22, 2017
Messages
660
Location
Denmark
So sorry! I wear Steel toe boots but they might not have helped here. I ABSOLUTELY will NOT have a double bit axe on my property. Here's why. They scare the crap out of me. I was raised splitting firewood and my story will blow your mind. We Coon hunted at night and after working and saving I was able to buy a miners Lamp and cap. We are talking around 1957 ish. Batteries were out of my budget but a can of carbide could last longer so it was my choice. The light made a flame. Water in a top tank, dry carbide bottom tank light the flame and you could barely see at night but I got by. The cap had a metal lamp holder riveted to the top of the bill bent up and lapped slightly over the top. Dad had dropped me off in the woods alone. Hell at 10 or 11 we worked like men. So in a while I decided to stick the Axe in the top of the stump. Wham! I hit that stump and BOUNCE back up flew the axe. It was like hitting rubber. A couple more tries and because I don't give up I was determined by gosh to drive that axe blade into the stump. This time I took a deep breath, let it out and gave that axe pure hell from a little boy who thought he was a man.
BAM then Bounce up and BAM right into my forehead.
The hit made me blink. Realized I was hit hard by the other sharp side of the axe I just dropped the axe and sat on that stump. After blinking and thinking I just knew my head must be laid open so I removed my cap and felt of my head. Had a knot but no blood. I picked up my cap and saw the Lamp holder was mangled. In fact it had kinda wrapped around the axe blade. There was a cut on part of the bill not protected by the metal. That cap might have extended my life. After that I would purposely dull one blade of the axe. I never told Dad. He was a slave driver. He'd have beat me. I'm 74 and still working. He probably did me a favor. I was never coddled. Can't much remember being a boy. Hard work is all I ever knew and somehow it makes a man feel better. I've got lots of scars but scars are for survivors. Take it easy. You learned from this. You'll be a better man for it. They need to build metal protectors for Boot tops. When I run my wood splitter I wear Shin Guards right on my boots. Had gloves on and still lost a finger nail a few months ago. Good luck.
Damn! Thanks for sharing :oops:
Double sided axes are not my thing either! I do agree that we need some metal protection on boot tops for sure!

Stay safe! I doubt I will be doing much work at 74 :bowdown:
 

MartDalb

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May 22, 2017
Messages
660
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Denmark
Glad you didn't get hurt to bad. I almost did that a while back with a pulaski axe, I was mad about something, it glanced off the wood and caught me right in the ankle but luckily I had my high tops on and good jeans. They sell boot covers to help prevent that now.
Yeah, I wish I have had my Stihl Rangers on that day.
My daughter came up to me last nite and said "dad, you ain't chopping anymore wood without these" and she had my Rangers on, :chop::yes:. She is 5 btw...:cool:
 

Wow

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Dec 23, 2017
Messages
706
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Louisiana
Ha. Ha. Daughters are wonderful. My 32 years old talks about HOW HARD she worked as a kid. Funny I remember a kid that played nearly all the time. But I have one Grandson that though Work WAS play. I'm like that. Lately I've had a lot of rain and sitting around causes rusty joints. I'm building a John Deer rider out of two old mowers. One carburetor cleaning trick I use is boiling Water. Add equal parts white Vinegar lower heat place METAL parts into the hot bath. Be careful blowing them out. Tiny bb's in some. They fly out never to be seen again.
Then carb spray while the metal is hot and I set mine up to cool. Cheap easy and does a fairly good job. Some Briggs carbs have plastic and 0 rings in them. This May work on Chainsaw carbs. Haven't tried. Has anyone thought about if and when we haul gasoline engines with floats, I'm thinking like a Generator, welder, etc. Is it better to have gas in the bowl. Here on the farm it's common to haul a generator on a trailer over bumpy trails and off road trails. Usually, on my gen the gas is off because they are run empty. Lately I've been adding petrol to fill the carb bowl so the liquid could dampen the bouncing of the float and maybe cushion the seat in the needle valve. Any ideas about what effect if any that may have?
 
husqvarna257

husqvarna257

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Jun 22, 2010
Messages
273
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Mass
Logging boots offer good foot protection. There are also foundry work boots that have steel plate I wear Husqvarna rubber logging boots now. 3 years ago I tossed out a 4' log out of my truck on a pile and it bounced back hit me in the shin and tossed me out of the truck. It split my shin open and swelled up for months. It was so red people insisted it was infected but it was not.
OP I hope your stiches help you heal up quicker, they should.
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

Firewood by TJ
Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
2,965
Location
Twin Peaks
I dropped my splitter on the side of my foot a couple of months ago. I thought life as I knew it was over. My new helper lost the bolt for the safety chain so did not hook it up. While unloading splitter did not realize there was no safety attached in the dark. We all know double checking some ones work is necessary but it gets over looked some time. Safety shoes or boots would have not offered any protection. Thanks
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

Firewood by TJ
Joined
Apr 18, 2016
Messages
2,965
Location
Twin Peaks
Ha. Ha. Daughters are wonderful. My 32 years old talks about HOW HARD she worked as a kid. Funny I remember a kid that played nearly all the time. But I have one Grandson that though Work WAS play. I'm like that. Lately I've had a lot of rain and sitting around causes rusty joints. I'm building a John Deer rider out of two old mowers. One carburetor cleaning trick I use is boiling Water. Add equal parts white Vinegar lower heat place METAL parts into the hot bath. Be careful blowing them out. Tiny bb's in some. They fly out never to be seen again.
Then carb spray while the metal is hot and I set mine up to cool. Cheap easy and does a fairly good job. Some Briggs carbs have plastic and 0 rings in them. This May work on Chainsaw carbs. Haven't tried. Has anyone thought about if and when we haul gasoline engines with floats, I'm thinking like a Generator, welder, etc. Is it better to have gas in the bowl. Here on the farm it's common to haul a generator on a trailer over bumpy trails and off road trails. Usually, on my gen the gas is off because they are run empty. Lately I've been adding petrol to fill the carb bowl so the liquid could dampen the bouncing of the float and maybe cushion the seat in the needle valve. Any ideas about what effect if any that may have?
Two things you mention are worth commenting on. The rest of the post is good too. As far as cleaning carbs you are not far off with how I address them. I will warm them up often to get the best results too. Some times hot water or just set them where it is warm. Bulk oven cleaner or many house hold cleaner like tile cleaner on a warm carb works wonders. Some times you need to soak them and other times be ready to rinse them with water and dry. Many carb cleaners work OK on a very warm carb too. I have found that it is necessary to have compressed air ready to blow out passages otherwise cleaner can build up in passages causing blockages.

If you want the gasoline to cushion the float you have to leave the gas on because the gas in the float will slosh around causing most gas to be spilled out. I have just not worried about that because I am always looking for old carbs to use for backup parts.

What I would really like to know is what you are doing with your mowers. Here there are always John Deers Craftsman etc. available for $200 to $500 which seems very practical. I am wanting to add front brakes, hydraulic winch, hydraulic loader bucket and a little more stability for front end. What is your plan Thanks
 

MartDalb

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Joined
May 22, 2017
Messages
660
Location
Denmark
Nice info being shared here, was not the point of the thread, but most certainly appricated and valued! :cheers: :bowdown:

On a side note, the wound is healing up good, have yet to remove the stitches, since I have not been sitting still, as doctor ordered :laugh:. Will be pulling them out very soon.
 
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