ArboristSite.com Sponsors
www.harvesterbars.com


Firewood...The Most Important Piece of Equipment

sirbuildalot

sirbuildalot

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Dec 16, 2015
Messages
834
Location
New England
My stacks are 4'x8'x16'' and that will fill most trucks level with top of bed tightly stacked. No way are you getting 3 times that in a single load, even with 2' side boards, that's only 2 face cord max.
Don't forget he said an 8' bed. Most full size pickups are 4' minimum between the wheel wells. That means around 6' wide total. If we assume 8 L x 6 W x 1.5 H, that equals 72 cubic feet. Three feet high, (or times 2) would be 144 cubic feet. Minus 3 cu. ft for each wheel well, and you're still at 138 cu. ft. A full cord is 128.

Definitely possible. Most likely your 4' x 8' x 16" stacks are filling up SHORT BED pickups. 95% of the new trucks I see are short bed extended cabs.
 
sirbuildalot

sirbuildalot

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Dec 16, 2015
Messages
834
Location
New England
I'm going to say a trailer is #1. It can be towed by various vehicles. Be it a truck, a car, a van, a tractor, a quad, a side by side, etc.

The tow vehicle may only be able to hold a very small amount of wood, or no wood at all, but even those small vehicles can usually haul/tow a considerable amount of wood. I've used garden tractors to haul up to a half cord (64 Cubic feet) of fresh cut oak at a time. Its the trailer that makes this possible.
 
Ryan'smilling

Ryan'smilling

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Mar 1, 2013
Messages
3,100
Location
Western WI
Dry oak weight per cord is 3528lb according to this chart. Even a 1 ton would be overloaded, by1528lb.
http://forestry.usu.edu/forest-products/wood-heating/
A one ton isn't called a one ton because you can put 2000# in it. Take the gross weight of the truck, subtract the curb weight and you have your payload capacity. I've had 4000# of feed (weighed at the elevator) in the bed of my truck and been under 8600# which is my legal gross.

And yes, that picture that I posted shows my truck with a full cord (3 4x8x16" face cords) of wood in it.

Edited to add: most new SRW one tons have a payload around 4000#. Duallys are over 5000#.
 
Ryan'smilling

Ryan'smilling

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Mar 1, 2013
Messages
3,100
Location
Western WI
My stacks are 4'x8'x16'' and that will fill most trucks level with top of bed tightly stacked. No way are you getting 3 times that in a single load, even with 2' side boards, that's only 2 face cord max.
So wait, which is it, is a face cord 1/3 of a cord or 2/3 like you said before? You're hard to follow.
 
4seasons

4seasons

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
831
Location
Greeneville, TN
If a face cord is defined by 8 ft by 4 ft by 16 in, then 3 face cord is equal to one cord.
My 3/4 ton bed measures 65 inches inside on the floor by 8 ft long. It is 18 in deep and has 45 inches between the wheelwells.
Simple math says 5.4 ft wide by 8 ft long by 1.5 ft deep gives you 65 cubic feet inside the bed minus about 6 cubic feet for the wheelwells. So you can haul a little less than 1/2 a cord inside the bed.
Now with the simple addition of sideboard to give you a 3 ft deep bed, you can double the cubic feet in the bed giving you 130 cubic feet or just over a cord and still be less than cab high. With sideboard, creative stacking, straps, or a custom bed you can easily fit over a cord of wood on a full size truck.
If you look at the weight of a cord of wood it varies greatly depending on wood species and moisture content. Dry poplar can weigh only 2000 lbs while green hickory can weigh 7000 lbs. While I am not suggesting that you ignore your truck's GVWR, I know that 1/2 ton trucks can handle 2000 lbs. I have had 3000 lbs on my shortbed Toyota before. I have a scale ticket from having 4000lbs of gravel on my 3/4 ton, so I know it can handle it. Now 7000 lbs might be stressing a 1 ton, but I have put more than that on one before.

Calling BS on something many of is have done before is an exercise in stupidity.
 

svk

Saw Hoarder
Joined
Oct 19, 2009
Messages
25,341
Location
MN
If a face cord is defined by 8 ft by 4 ft by 16 in, then 3 face cord is equal to one cord.
My 3/4 ton bed measures 65 inches inside on the floor by 8 ft long. It is 18 in deep and has 45 inches between the wheelwells.
Simple math says 5.4 ft wide by 8 ft long by 1.5 ft deep gives you 65 cubic feet inside the bed minus about 6 cubic feet for the wheelwells. So you can haul a little less than 1/2 a cord inside the bed.
Now with the simple addition of sideboard to give you a 3 ft deep bed, you can double the cubic feet in the bed giving you 130 cubic feet or just over a cord and still be less than cab high. With sideboard, creative stacking, straps, or a custom bed you can easily fit over a cord of wood on a full size truck.
If you look at the weight of a cord of wood it varies greatly depending on wood species and moisture content. Dry poplar can weigh only 2000 lbs while green hickory can weigh 7000 lbs. While I am not suggesting that you ignore your truck's GVWR, I know that 1/2 ton trucks can handle 2000 lbs. I have had 3000 lbs on my shortbed Toyota before. I have a scale ticket from having 4000lbs of gravel on my 3/4 ton, so I know it can handle it. Now 7000 lbs might be stressing a 1 ton, but I have put more than that on one before.
Your estimation is correct. I can fit about a half cord (tossed, heaped) in my long box that has a small side mounted tool box and spare tire in the box. I figured 1/3 cord in my old short box (tossed, heaped) or 1/2 (stacked, heaped). One time we did stack aspen splits carefully in the short box and the middle of the mound was up to the roof. Called it 3/4 cord.
 

sb47

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Jun 14, 2011
Messages
5,125
Location
Texas
If a face cord is defined by 8 ft by 4 ft by 16 in, then 3 face cord is equal to one cord.
My 3/4 ton bed measures 65 inches inside on the floor by 8 ft long. It is 18 in deep and has 45 inches between the wheelwells.
Simple math says 5.4 ft wide by 8 ft long by 1.5 ft deep gives you 65 cubic feet inside the bed minus about 6 cubic feet for the wheelwells. So you can haul a little less than 1/2 a cord inside the bed.
Now with the simple addition of sideboard to give you a 3 ft deep bed, you can double the cubic feet in the bed giving you 130 cubic feet or just over a cord and still be less than cab high. With sideboard, creative stacking, straps, or a custom bed you can easily fit over a cord of wood on a full size truck.
If you look at the weight of a cord of wood it varies greatly depending on wood species and moisture content. Dry poplar can weigh only 2000 lbs while green hickory can weigh 7000 lbs. While I am not suggesting that you ignore your truck's GVWR, I know that 1/2 ton trucks can handle 2000 lbs. I have had 3000 lbs on my shortbed Toyota before. I have a scale ticket from having 4000lbs of gravel on my 3/4 ton, so I know it can handle it. Now 7000 lbs might be stressing a 1 ton, but I have put more than that on one before.

Calling BS on something many of is have done before is an exercise in stupidity.

Speaking of stupidity, Overloading the GVWR also qualify's as an exercise in stupidity.
 
jrider

jrider

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Nov 14, 2011
Messages
2,546
Location
nj
Losing my big saw pretty much shuts me down. I generally get a lot of logs 20" in diameter and up. I only own 3 saws and 2 are smaller saws I use for limbing and wood under 8" or so. I only need my truck come delivery time.
 
lknchoppers

lknchoppers

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Oct 10, 2014
Messages
494
Age
56
A face cord is 1/3 of a cord. I carry a full cord in my long bed F250 Super Duty all the time with side boards and a tailgate extender that matches the side boards. It will also be mounded up in the center. I also pull a cord and a quarter mounded up in my dump trailer all at the same time. I have done this hundreds of times without any issues.

Here are the Specs:

2003 Ford F-250 Super Cab
Pickup truck
Model: 2003 Ford F-250
Curb weight: 5,601 to 6,310 lbs
Dimensions: 231-248″ L x 80″ W x 77-79″ H
Wheelbase: 142 to 158″
Fuel tank capacity: 29 to 38 gal
Towing capacity: 12,500 lbs
Payload: 2,490 to 3,199 lbs

The payload range is due to some F250s did not come with the auxiliary/overload spring.

Below is some good info on the new trucks. The new F250 has a 4200 lb. Payload BTW

https://www.autobytel.com/trucks/car-buying-guides/10-trucks-with-largest-payloads-131339/
 
4seasons

4seasons

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
831
Location
Greeneville, TN
Speaking of stupidity, Overloading the GVWR also qualify's as an exercise in stupidity.
If you look a little closer I said that I am not recommending exceeding GVWR.

Now pulling numbers from Dodge:
1500 GVWR 6400 lbs
--- Payload 4x2 8ft bed 2140 lbs
2500 GVWR 8800 lbs
--- Payload 4x2 8ft bed 3830 lbs
3500 GVWR 10500
--- Payload 4x2 8ft bed 5110 lbs

Now these numbers are different between manufacturer, equipment and years. Further complicated by all three US makers have produced heavy 1/2, light 3/4, super duty, single tire 1ton and dually, and these numbers can vary quite a bit. So only use this as a rough guide line but the facts show:

1 tons can haul 2 1/2 tons
3/4 tons can haul just shy of 2 tons
1/2 tons can haul just over a ton

Now if you are implying that I recommend 3000 lbs on a 1/2 ton or 8000 lbs on a one ton, I didn't say that I had either of those on the road. I have a small farm and put way more than I would haul down the highway on the truck to get it out of the woods or field. I said the truck can handle it because I have done it, not that I recommend it.

I will recommend you get some facts before calling BS on someone and starting an argument with those of us with more knowledge and experience.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
 

sb47

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Jun 14, 2011
Messages
5,125
Location
Texas
If you look a little closer I said that I am not recommending exceeding GVWR.

Now pulling numbers from Dodge:
1500 GVWR 6400 lbs
--- Payload 4x2 8ft bed 2140 lbs
2500 GVWR 8800 lbs
--- Payload 4x2 8ft bed 3830 lbs
3500 GVWR 10500
--- Payload 4x2 8ft bed 5110 lbs

Now these numbers are different between manufacturer, equipment and years. Further complicated by all three US makers have produced heavy 1/2, light 3/4, super duty, single tire 1ton and dually, and these numbers can vary quite a bit. So only use this as a rough guide line but the facts show:

1 tons can haul 2 1/2 tons
3/4 tons can haul just shy of 2 tons
1/2 tons can haul just over a ton

Now if you are implying that I recommend 3000 lbs on a 1/2 ton or 8000 lbs on a one ton, I didn't say that I had either of those on the road. I have a small farm and put way more than I would haul down the highway on the truck to get it out of the woods or field. I said the truck can handle it because I have done it, not that I recommend it.

I will recommend you get some facts before calling BS on someone and starting an argument with those of us with more knowledge and experience.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
If you had understood a little better, GVWR is besides the point. By volume you still can't haul 3 face cord on a single truck bed, unless you stack it 6+ feet high.
 
Ryan'smilling

Ryan'smilling

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Mar 1, 2013
Messages
3,100
Location
Western WI
If you had understood a little better, GVWR is besides the point. By volume you still can't haul 3 face cord on a single truck bed, unless you stack it 6+ feet high.
Really!? You still don't believe it?

You need to recheck your math. My truck bed is 8' long. It's 5' wide. If you stacked the wood it would be to be 3.2' talk to constitute a full cord. See, 8x5x3.2=128. Yes, you'd need to add a few pieces to make up for the wheel wells.

As I showed in my picture before, my truck with side boards to the top of the cab easily carries a full cord. A stack in the front, a stack at the back and the rest tossed in the middle.
 

sb47

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Jun 14, 2011
Messages
5,125
Location
Texas
Really!? You still don't believe it?

You need to recheck your math. My truck bed is 8' long. It's 5' wide. If you stacked the wood it would be to be 3.2' talk to constitute a full cord. See, 8x5x3.2=128. Yes, you'd need to add a few pieces to make up for the wheel wells.

As I showed in my picture before, my truck with side boards to the top of the cab easily carries a full cord. A stack in the front, a stack at the back and the rest tossed in the middle.
The key words are face cord, That could mean anything.
 
Top