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Flogging Rooster

Discussion in 'Off the Topic Forum' started by TNTreeHugger, May 29, 2019.

  1. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Someone gave me a rooster about two weeks ago. It was sort of a rescue situation since they guy was keeping him in a very small cage behind his shop. I didn't need a rooster and wasn't looking for one, but here he is just the same.
    The guy told me his wings had been clipped, that he couldn't fly, or even jump on a perch.
    He also told me that he *thought* the person he got him from used the rooster as a sort of sparring partner for other fighting roosters. Also said he thought he was pretty old, six years or so.
    I felt sorry for the little thing and decided to bring him home so he could roam free in peace and quite.

    When I got him home, I left him in the box while I fixed the gate on the chicken pen. When I opened the box *POOF* he jumped right out of it just fine.
    About an hour later, I see him perched up on the barn door, and an hour later, he had flown out of the pen. Since Mr. Rooster CAN fly, I left the gate open.

    About the flogging..............

    The first time was when I was cleaning up the pen for him. I was covered up and had on boots and gloves. When I saw what he was about to do, I just put up my hands and swatted him down. When he tried it again, I went after him, getting him cornered, then picking him up and holding him for a few minutes, thinking he would realize I wasn't his enemy.
    That didn't work. While working out in the yard the following week, he was okay most of the time, but if I got close and turned my back he came after me.

    So, I decided a different strategy was needed.
    I started scolding him like I would a dog, pointing my finger at him and yelling "NO! Don't do that!" until he took a step back and settled down, which he eventually did. When he did look like he was not going to back down I went after him, shooing him, pointing my finger, and ordering him to get back in his house... and he did, then left me alone.
    Sometimes, I'll just point my finger at him and order him to "eat your bugs and mind your own business!!" :p

    The problem is, I'm not always in the yard dressed for yard work with long sleeves, jeans, boots, and gloves.
    When I'm not, I think he can sense my fear and doesn't back down like he does the other times... and I am afraid when I'm not protected because the one time he got me good - putting a good sized knot and bruise on the back of my hand and almost broke the skin on my forearm - packed a helluva punch for a little guy!!!

    Other than putting him in a pot, like most everyone on Youtube recommends, is there a better way to make him stop flogging me??
    Btw, he and the dog don't have a problem at all. It's just me.

    Would he calm down if he had other poultry company, or would that just make him worse and even more protective?? I don't want to sacrifice some poor little chicken to save my neck either.

    I'd like to keep him. I like the crowing and especially the fact that he's a bug-eater.

    Any advice? DSC04014.JPG
     
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  2. CentaurG2

    CentaurG2 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    He is a good looking boy. Congrats on your new bird and it is great to hear of someone who will actually adopt a rooster. Chickens have unique such unique personalities; it is almost a shame to eat them. Some roosters are very gentle. Others will camp out by your door and wait for you to come out so they can tool you.

    Your boy is probably just trying to figure out who is boss. You want to make sure he knows you are the boss. If they act aggressive, I usually just grab them and carry them around with me for about 10 mins. They usually don’t like it but eventually learn that I will pick them up each time and they won’t go anywhere near me. If you can’t catch him, you could try a squirt bottle or opening up an umbrella. You two will eventually work things out and he will eventually settle in and be fine with you. Other birds will probably only exacerbate the situation.

    A lot of people are terrified of large birds. As a boy, we always had a couple of geese on the farm. Aggressive goose makes an aggressive rooster look like a boy scout. They really know how to put a hurt on you. They bite like two files in a vice and proceed to beat you with their wings. Even through jeans they would leave welts and bruises.
     
  3. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Thank you, you have just boosted my confidence level.:) I like the squirt bottle idea.

    I know a lot of people just freak out over birds in general, but I have pet Starling, so they don't scare me - Mr. Rooster, on the other hand, is something else all together!
    Kung-foo rooster! neck puffed up, wings out-stretched, and feet straight up in the air.
    But you know what? When I was holding him, I had one hand around his neck - his very scrawny little neck. I don't think it would take much to put him down... but I'd rather not have to.
     
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  4. CentaurG2

    CentaurG2 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    On our lake property we have a family of mute swans. They had 6 signets this year, 5 grey and one white one (leucism). The signets are super neat as they ride around on the back of their mother. They load right up on her like amphicars and use her like a boat. Daddy is one big honkin’ aggressive bird. He is like 4 geese on steroids. I have seen him kill ducks and Canadian geese that are foolish enough to get near them. I have even seen him roll kayakers who get too close. He takes off like a PBY Catalina and smashes into them like a jet ski. Them MENSA boys don’t know what him them.


    What are you going to name your new boy? Something cool like Willow Tree, Tyson, Kung-pao or Moo-shi??
     
  5. esshup

    esshup Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Grab neck with one hand, head with the other, twist and pull. No more problems. I won't go looking for trouble, but if a bird comes after me it'll be the last thing it does.
     
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  6. 67L36Driver

    67L36Driver Tree Freak

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    Call him “mashed potatoes and green beans”, he will go good with them.



    Or, trade him for a buck rabbit. They are cool critters.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Sagetown

    Sagetown Farmer and a STIHL

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    Roosters want to be dominate. They'll try, and try, hoping some day to succeed. Same with sheep. Never make a pet out of a baby ram lamb. No matter how cute they are let them stay afraid of you, or when they grow up they'll eat your lunch, and I don't mean the one in your lunch bucket. Ewe lambs are different. However, never allow children to aggravate chickens, ducks, or geese. They remember those kids, and will pounce on them at every opportunity. And yes, chickens can sense fear in humans too, and will challenge them.
     
  8. CentaurG2

    CentaurG2 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Sheep aint no biggie. Never had a problem with an intact ram or a weather. Bottle raised way too many in my years and they have all been fine. Treats and some common sense are required but it is just a sheep not a stallion or a bull.
     
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  9. CentaurG2

    CentaurG2 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I don’t know. This is one big bird. Here vids that gives some idea of the scale and you usually catch and handle geese by the neck. They are tough buggers.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxd53ykmTvc


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEQm6COkZuI
     
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  10. wrx-snowdrift

    wrx-snowdrift ArboristSite Operative

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    Does he still have his spurs?
    De-spurring our rooster calmed him down some.
     
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  11. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I don't think so... when I was holding him I checked out his feet because there was a little bleeding on top near the feathers, he has a "nub" about an inch and a half long on the back of his ankle, but it isn't sharp. Did someone cut it off? Does it grow back??? :surprised3: I hope not.
     
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  12. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Cute bunny! ... but then I'd have no garden. :rolleyes:

     
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  13. chipper1

    chipper1 Living Life to the Full

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    From treehugger to birdhugger :laugh:.
     
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  14. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    That's what I'm thinking... he's just being a rooster.
    Also, even if he is behaving, I don't think I could ever trust him enough to turn my back on him.
    I saw this sign at the co-op and thought it a perfect warning to put on the barn. :D
    it really made me think of my mother... she used to say that all the time... "You better watch your step." :laughing:
    DSC04044.JPG
     
  15. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    :dancing: Yup, that's me.
     
  16. wrx-snowdrift

    wrx-snowdrift ArboristSite Operative

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    Yes that nub is his spur, if they are and inch and a half long they must not have been removed. They are a roosters main weapon. Several ways to remove them, some trim them but they grow back, some use a hot potato to burn off the outer layer effectively "killing" the spur. I just used a pliers and twisted off the outer layer and then sprayed the nub with H2O2. Lots of videos out there on ways to do it. Easiest to do it is at night while he's roosting. Grab him off his roost by his feet and hang him upside down, hanging chickens upside-down keeps them calm. They flap for a few seconds and then go into a sort of coma.
     
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  17. chipper1

    chipper1 Living Life to the Full

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    This next :lol:.
    Screen Shot 2019-05-29 at 5.01.05 PM.png
     
  18. holeycow

    holeycow Addicted to ArboristSite

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    You haven’t met an aggressive ram yet.

    They can be very dangerous.

    I have never met an exceedingly aggressive bull or horse...only an exceedingly aggressive ram..

    I’ve had lots of various critters on the farm over the years. The most dangerous by far was a ram. Then a gander. Then some roosters. All of those things attack from behind.

    The ram is easy as long as you see him coming. Just wait till he puts his head down and then step aside.

    The ram, the gander, and the rooster just won’t learn.

    At least you can teach a horse and a bull respect. Make a horse face you. Make a bull turn away.

    That’s a heck of a nice rooster op! Unfortunately he “has your number”. I like the holding him and carrying him around for a while idea.

    Ps, those “nubs” grow into curved daggers. Mighty fine weapons they are.
     
  19. gary courtney

    gary courtney Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I vote we change your name to Peach !
     
  20. Sagetown

    Sagetown Farmer and a STIHL

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    Roosters can lose their spurs if their comb is severely damaged. Usually in a fight with another rooster. Clipping the tips with a pair of dog nail clippers and filing them isn't hard on them at all.
    As for sheep. A healthy Ram from my flock can kill ya.
    JR RAM 09_05_11 019.jpg
     

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