ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


For hire in your area: sharpen chains by hand

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by livemusic, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. MontanaResident

    MontanaResident A Stihl Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2014
    Messages:
    3,140
    Likes Received:
    3,427
    Location:
    N. W. Montana
    There's a guy on here that made a raker/depth gauge tool that measures to 1/1000ths of an inch. IMO, jolly good for him and to those that think that is awesome. My wood stove don't care.
     
    Stihl 041S, catbuster and Skeans like this.
  2. Huskybill

    Huskybill Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    May 21, 2018
    Messages:
    3,958
    Likes Received:
    2,999
    Location:
    Northeast
    With a brand new chain I use a 7/32” file free hand on the gullet first for the exiting chip clearance. Then I use a 7/32” round file with the file n guide so the upper edge of the tooth gets sharpened razor sharp.

    On every gas up I make one pass on each tooth with the file n guide.

    At the end of the day before I shower and eat, I check the raker depths, looking down the front of the bar I eye ball the raker depth, run the file n guide one last time just one pass. The air filter gets washed, the bar nose and clutch drum get a shot of grease. I check the bar rails.

    Practice doing your rakers by eye. I usually make two passes on each raker. The worst worn maybe three.

    For grinding the bar rails even I use the 30”x1” hf belt sander. When the rails are even I chamfer the outside corner of the rails. On the inside corner I run the corner of the file and chamfer both inside edges. Not too wide of a chamfer. Just break the corners.
     
    catbuster and Skeans like this.
  3. SEAM

    SEAM Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2013
    Messages:
    1,318
    Likes Received:
    1,544
    Location:
    Japan
    I would never sharpen chains for others for money. Just the thought is scary looking at the way most treat their saws over here.
    But I show them the difference between dull and sharp and how to maintain their B&C combos if they are interested...
     
  4. Huskybill

    Huskybill Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    May 21, 2018
    Messages:
    3,958
    Likes Received:
    2,999
    Location:
    Northeast
    I sharpen chains for my buddy’s dad. He worked in the shop with my dad. Once he seen how my chains cut he always brought me his dull chains.

    Its really not making money sharpening chains and doing bar service. How much can we charge.? The new huztl chains are $5 to $7 each. With a huztl bar it’s $9/$12 b&c combo.
     
  5. Cliff R

    Cliff R Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    2,212
    Likes Received:
    1,375
    Location:
    Mount Vernon, Ohio
    Sharpening chains is a skill that you learn and continue to get better at over your lifetime. Just like learning to sharpen a drill bit, for example, at first you'll have troubles, figure it out somewhat, and continue to get better and better at it the more practice you get.

    I do all mine by hand, never owned or even thought about buying a grinder. WAY back when I first started running saws and cutting firewood (mid 1970's) I kept 2-3 loops and paid to have them sharpened. That deal didn't last long as they ground a LOT off of them and I'd only get a few outings before I was replacing them.

    I learned how to correctly hand file, and lower rakers, and touch up every time I stop to fuel up, or between every outing depending on how things work out. My chains last a LONG time, and they are sharper and cut faster than any sort of machine grind could do for them........Cliff
     
  6. Philbert

    Philbert Chainsaw Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    15,792
    Likes Received:
    22,062
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I usually use an Oregon 511A type grinder at home, and touch up in the field with a file and basic guide. The grinder is especially important for refurbishing chains others have sharpened or abused, like some of the disaster volunteer groups I work with.

    The auto filer is just something that was introduced recently - perhaps of special interest to folks who think that chains should only be filed, and never ground? For the guy who loves his Granberg jig, but has lots of loops to sharpen? I would love the opportunity to try one, just out of interest.

    Yes, no matter how you get there. In my opinion, it starts with knowing what a sharp cutter looks like. If you don't know that, just hitting it with a file, grinder, jig, etc. does not get you there.

    Disagree there. Chain will still cut, but with different length cutters comes different height cutters and different set (kerf width) of cutters. Cut will not be as smooth as if all cutters are the same.

    Screen shot 2014-05-30 at 10.11.10 PM.png Screen shot 2014-05-30 at 10.26.09 PM.png

    You can shape the gullet any way that you want. That is why I can touch up a chain that I ground at home with a file in the field: I grind as I file and file as I grind.

    To properly file the cutting edges and shape the gullet requires multiple passes and positioning of the file. Some guys use a larger diameter file for the gullet. Same thing with the grinder: I usually make multiple passes, but could also change the profile of the wheel to make a desired shape and angle. Like you said, 'sharp is sharp'.

    Philbert
     
  7. Huskybill

    Huskybill Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    May 21, 2018
    Messages:
    3,958
    Likes Received:
    2,999
    Location:
    Northeast
    I had the Oregon grinder and I don’t think it can match a good file sharpening. The grinder came in handy when installing the chain repair kits after hitting a rock or pipe in the wood. I’ll stick with a file.
     
    Philbert likes this.
  8. Philbert

    Philbert Chainsaw Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2006
    Messages:
    15,792
    Likes Received:
    22,062
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Personal preference. I respect that. People need to find what works for them.

    Philbert
     
    Duce, Cycledude and farmer steve like this.
  9. HarleyT

    HarleyT Tree Freak

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2014
    Messages:
    14,507
    Likes Received:
    12,447
    Let us see some pics!!
     
  10. madmarksolomon

    madmarksolomon Timber Junkie

    Joined:
    May 26, 2013
    Messages:
    188
    Likes Received:
    148
    Location:
    North East California
    I may regret this but here you go Harley 6CA0EC68-C729-474A-87E8-78BA477B292A.jpeg 2FAAAEEB-DFBF-444C-9BBD-D3EDB92616E2.jpeg 3B0C99A6-C94C-46C4-9912-8B35A99CF6A7.jpeg
     
  11. Mike Kunte

    Mike Kunte ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2017
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    244
    Location:
    South Africa
    farmer steve likes this.
  12. KiwiBro

    KiwiBro Hold my beer and film this...

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2009
    Messages:
    7,134
    Likes Received:
    15,013
    Location:
    Aotearoa
    A hand filing service, if it morphed into a 1/2 hr lesson, might be something a few people would be interested in, but probably not enough around here.
     
    Philbert and farmer steve like this.
  13. Justsaws

    Justsaws Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2006
    Messages:
    4,537
    Likes Received:
    1,516
    Location:
    Zanesville Ohio
    By not adjusting the depth gauge the potential for kickback is reduced. As most shops are not set up to adjust the depth gauge with the exactness that the chain came from the factory it is regarded as best to leave the factory depth gauge as is. The average chain saw sharpening machine is not as accurate before the operator is even involved, and all the guides to help people achieve some sort of unity across the length of chain are also not exact cutter to cutter in regards to as new from the factory, let alone most do not restore the depth gauge to the exact factory shape.

    Depth gauge adjusting and replacing broken or damaged links are fading into the past. Spinning chain off a reel in house is getting rare, let alone bar maintenance.
     
  14. ChoppyChoppy

    ChoppyChoppy Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    9,761
    Likes Received:
    9,238
    Location:
    AK
    We do all that at the shop. Thought it was SOP?
     
    Philbert, Skeans and Mike Kunte like this.
  15. Skeans

    Skeans Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2013
    Messages:
    2,449
    Likes Received:
    2,839
    Location:
    Rainier, Or
    pavel408 likes this.
  16. MontanaResident

    MontanaResident A Stihl Fanatic

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2014
    Messages:
    3,140
    Likes Received:
    3,427
    Location:
    N. W. Montana
    I have been using one of these now for a month. Along with my reading glasses, the details can be seen and appropriate adjustments can be made. Makes a HUGE difference.

    [​IMG]
     
    sundance likes this.
  17. Justsaws

    Justsaws Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2006
    Messages:
    4,537
    Likes Received:
    1,516
    Location:
    Zanesville Ohio
    Nope.
     
  18. Jeff Lary

    Jeff Lary Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2012
    Messages:
    2,749
    Likes Received:
    1,254
    Location:
    Hartland Maine
    I can get 6 cord sawn stove length usually without much issue.
     
    pioneerguy600 likes this.
  19. pioneerguy600

    pioneerguy600 Lost in Space Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2007
    Messages:
    39,052
    Likes Received:
    20,199
    Location:
    N.S. Canada
    I think its a regional thing Jeff, Maine and NS hardwood is very clean and dust free, I handle my hardwood mostly during the winter, keep it off the ground and no mud or debris on it and I can cut a full day not dulling the chain. One cut through frozen on soil or woods debris and that chain needs attention.
     
    woodchuckcanuck and Stihl 041S like this.
  20. Jethro 2t sniffer

    Jethro 2t sniffer Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2018
    Messages:
    2,134
    Likes Received:
    1,931
    Location:
    new zealand
    I have been buying bags of presets and replacing broken or bent cutters on chains with life left and just peening the rivets over with a hammer. Some chains I have 4 or 5 cutters replaced lol on a 20 inch chain. Chain isn't cheap in nz so my relaxing time with a beer in the shed is free and a few bucks for some links why not I say. And old chain cuts really nicely too.
     
    cus_deluxe and Stihl 041S like this.

Share This Page