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Glowing fire brick

U&A

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View attachment 771501
so, I’m doing a really hot fire of Mulberry And oak, and the fire brick on my baffle started glowing. Don’t know if I should be worried about it tonight or not, I just thought it was kind of cool so I took a picture of it.
Don’t worry about the fire brick if it gets a bit red. Worry about the stainless and mild steel parts if THEY get red. That is bad.

Do you monitor temps at any spot on the stove? You should go by how it looks first and foremost and then use something like a Stove Top Temp (STT) as a guide as well.

My P.E. summit runs best between 500-600 STT for the first hour or so with a new load to help start up that secondary burn and burn off the high amounts of wood gas that is being released in the beginning. Then it will efficiently run all night or day In the mid to high 400’s.

Here she is blowing the secondary burn flames down about 1 hour in to a new load. See the average STT of 522F. It will drop down a bit and then do one last spike when the front 1/3 of the logs coal up real good and throw off a lot of heat.



Sent while firmly grasping my redline lubed RAM
 
pauljoseph

pauljoseph

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used to use a stove top temp gauge but I use an IR gun for that now. A good fire will put my stove top between 650 and 750, and then cruise down slowly from there.burn tubes Have never started glowing red in a way that would worry me but I think that’s the first time I’ve seen the brick glow a little bit. It was pretty cool. The stove is done a pretty good job since I bought it 10 years ago, even after I over fired it one good time.
 

sb47

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used to use a stove top temp gauge but I use an IR gun for that now. A good fire will put my stove top between 650 and 750, and then cruise down slowly from there.burn tubes Have never started glowing red in a way that would worry me but I think that’s the first time I’ve seen the brick glow a little bit. It was pretty cool. The stove is done a pretty good job since I bought it 10 years ago, even after I over fired it one good time.
I prefer the IR gun because you can instantly get readings on various parts of the stove. I to get readings in the 600/700 range depending on where I take a reading.

At the deer camp we had a cheap sheet metal stove and I have seen it turn red hot on the sides and when you shut the damper down it will chug like an old steem train and almost walk across the floor.

As long as there is space around the stove that can't catch fire it shouldn't mater how hot it gets.
I have a duel heat shield between the back wall and the stove and when the stove is at it's hottest the wall is under 100* behind the shield.
 
anlrolfe

anlrolfe

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IR gun will work on the exterior of the stove but can't "see through" the glass.

Also, they average temps in the "cone" they are scanning. ie 8:1 ratio is looking at 1" area if you are 8" away. Many IR guns are 4:1 the farther away think shotgun blast size of area that it's looking at.
 

sb47

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IR gun will work on the exterior of the stove but can't "see through" the glass.

Also, they average temps in the "cone" they are scanning. ie 8:1 ratio is looking at 1" area if you are 8" away. Many IR guns are 4:1 the farther away think shotgun blast size of area that it's looking at.

Well just open the door dummy!:surprised3:;)
Also get as close as you can and use the highest reading you get.:buttkick:
 
anlrolfe

anlrolfe

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The laser dot is just a pointer, think of this more like a camera focussing the energy on the sensing circuit and averaging the values.
Emissivity of the flames IR will f-up any chance of small point measurement.
Thermal photography may give better clarity with flame.

20191113_164406.jpg

I use a Fluke thermal imager for electrical distribution. Sometimes I do energy audits. Here is a pic I took of an Optimus 111 camp stove burner.

1330093199-111B_roarer_opt.jpg

Yes, that's 666-deg and 32 degrees variance to the outer ring
 
anlrolfe

anlrolfe

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The heat shield on the lower right isn't that hot, that's reflection. Think of that if you ever watch a ghost hunter show and some guber has the thermal camera. Often they pick up their or someone else's thermal reflection from a slick surface...
Oops, spoiler alert
 
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