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Going legit

Hoosier Artificer

Hoosier Artificer

New Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2021
Messages
3
Location
Leesville Louisiana
So I've been known to tie a Swiss seat and rig myself up a set length flip line (usually soaked to give it some weight). I have decided I am now old enough to be an actual adult. I want to keep to a reasonable budget. I drag saws up trees for fun, not profit. What gear should I start off with to one, be more comfortable, and two, not die. I already plan to get some proper spikes, a weaver sadle, and a proper flipline with a cam adjuster.
 

Yarz

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Nov 7, 2016
Messages
101
Location
Tarentum, PA
What is your goal by "going legit"? Are you planning to remove the trees you are climbing, or just getting proper gear to climb for fun more safely? If not removing them, spikes are not recommended since they wound the tree, potentially opening it up to bugs or disease.
I'm asking because you're post is in the recreational climbing section, so I was unsure.

To your point of not dying, tying in twice is recommended, especially if cutting. So a getting a rope to setup a moving rope system over a higher tie-in point would be a good idea.
 
Harmon

Harmon

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
101
Location
Haines
Some type of skull bucket. A decent rope and some kind of prussik/ mechanical friction device. some basic first aid for a massive bleed. If yr gonna get some spurs, its worth a lot to get decent leg pads with velcro. If you are dragging a saw up there, get a real climbing saw. And since this isn't for profit, charge enough to buy some decent gear. Because that aint profit, that just makes it fun
 
Dave1960_Gorge

Dave1960_Gorge

ArboristSite Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2021
Messages
81
Location
Hood River
Get a copy of the ANSI Z133 Arboricultural Operations Standard. ISA charges a lot for it, but its worth it. Shoulda paid more attention to it....check out the "Uncontrolled pendulum swing" thread in Injuries and Fatalities. Read 6.3 Chain Saws, 8.1 Ropes and Arborist Climbing Equipment, 8.2 Pruning and Trimming, 8.4 Rigging, 8.5 Tree Removal. Then hang out with and/or work for someone in the game for years that is big on safety. I thought I was one of those guys.

I have been climbing seriously for 13 years and finally went for a hospital stay on the 11th. No bueno.

I use a single line system to get into a tall tree, and use a second double rope system to get around. Fewer gadgets that way. I have learned that sometimes you might want 2 or even three double rope systems in a large spreading tree: easier to balance in any direction, and beats climbing down and up, or shinnying up and down the stems like a bear cub.
 
Hoosier Artificer

Hoosier Artificer

New Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2021
Messages
3
Location
Leesville Louisiana
What is your goal by "going legit"? Are you planning to remove the trees you are climbing, or just getting proper gear to climb for fun more safely? If not removing them, spikes are not recommended since they wound the tree, potentially opening it up to bugs or disease.
I'm asking because you're post is in the recreational climbing section, so I was unsure.

To your point of not dying, tying in twice is recommended, especially if cutting. So a getting a rope to setup a moving rope system over a higher tie-in point would be a good idea.
Still doing it for fun and to take care of my own trees and help out the occasional friend. I can afford to get proper gear but tend to not to want to spend much on tools that I don't use everyday. I have probably close to 10k in chainsaws as I mill and raise trees for fun.
 
Walkdog

Walkdog

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
45
Location
Bay Area
OP it sounds like you might have more saws than you need, so if money is an issue, sell a couple you use the least to help free up the $2k+ you’ll need to buy “legit” climbing gear.

Seriously, if you can afford $10k in saws and plan on taking them up in trees for fun, you would be a fool to buy anything but top tier climbing gear. The equipment has come further in the last decade than I can begin to explain, and the benefits of the new tech in terms of safety, comfort and efficiency are worth 10x the price difference over the outdated gear you’re thinking about buying.

Fatigue and poor work positioning (along with impatiently taking too large pieces at once) are the biggest avoidable causes of injury and death in the field - good gear and judgement will go a long way in helping keep you safe.

Get a modern saddle - sequoia, treemotion, monkey beaver, etc. - huge increase in comfort and mobility. Less consumable than most other gear and worth every penny.

At least two throwlines and bags.

At least two good 11.7mm static ropes - keep one reserved exclusively for pitchy conifers.

A good modern mechanical friction device like a zigzag, unicender akimbo, or rope runner pro.

A pinto pulley and several good friction hitches (I like epicord).

At least two good oval carabiners - DMM, rock exotica, or petzl.

Foot ascender and HAAS or SAKA knee ascender.

At least one good rope lanyard (recommend TriTech), two for sure if you’re going to buy spurs and plan on doing spar work. Skip the steel core flipline unless you’re going to be doing big conifer removals. 2-in-1 can be very versatile and cost efficient. ART positioner 2 and zillion are joys to use compared to other mechanical rope grabs.

On the subject of spurs, you won’t get a comfortable new pair under $350, and uncomfortable spurs are excruciating. Highly recommend Geckos.

You’ll need another grand or so for a proper rigging kit - at least two ropes, portawrap & big anchor sling, couple blocks/pulleys & ring slings, steel carabiners. The more slings the better.

It may seem like overkill for occasional use, but will give you the capability to actually tackle most jobs safely, assuming you are able to put together a sound plan of attack and have the skill to execute it.
 
Hoosier Artificer

Hoosier Artificer

New Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2021
Messages
3
Location
Leesville Louisiana
OP it sounds like you might have more saws than you need, so if money is an issue, sell a couple you use the least to help free up the $2k+ you’ll need to buy “legit” climbing gear.

Seriously, if you can afford $10k in saws and plan on taking them up in trees for fun, you would be a fool to buy anything but top tier climbing gear. The equipment has come further in the last decade than I can begin to explain, and the benefits of the new tech in terms of safety, comfort and efficiency are worth 10x the price difference over the outdated gear you’re thinking about buying.

Fatigue and poor work positioning (along with impatiently taking too large pieces at once) are the biggest avoidable causes of injury and death in the field - good gear and judgement will go a long way in helping keep you safe.

Get a modern saddle - sequoia, treemotion, monkey beaver, etc. - huge increase in comfort and mobility. Less consumable than most other gear and worth every penny.

At least two throwlines and bags.

At least two good 11.7mm static ropes - keep one reserved exclusively for pitchy conifers.

A good modern mechanical friction device like a zigzag, unicender akimbo, or rope runner pro.

A pinto pulley and several good friction hitches (I like epicord).

At least two good oval carabiners - DMM, rock exotica, or petzl.

Foot ascender and HAAS or SAKA knee ascender.

At least one good rope lanyard (recommend TriTech), two for sure if you’re going to buy spurs and plan on doing spar work. Skip the steel core flipline unless you’re going to be doing big conifer removals. 2-in-1 can be very versatile and cost efficient. ART positioner 2 and zillion are joys to use compared to other mechanical rope grabs.

On the subject of spurs, you won’t get a comfortable new pair under $350, and uncomfortable spurs are excruciating. Highly recommend Geckos.

You’ll need another grand or so for a proper rigging kit - at least two ropes, portawrap & big anchor sling, couple blocks/pulleys & ring slings, steel carabiners. The more slings the better.

It may seem like overkill for occasional use, but will give you the capability to actually tackle most jobs safely, assuming you are able to put together a sound plan of attack and have the skill to execute it.
Would you mind clarifying pinto pulley? I'm good on carabiners and lanyards. Used to work medevac and no one wants to fall off the hoist.
I'm more familiar with drt than srt. I've got pretty rough sciatica so foot and knee isn't always a good option. Which is ironic as I install metal roofs. I work because I'm bored.
 
Walkdog

Walkdog

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
45
Location
Bay Area
The pinto and pinto rig are pulleys by DMM. Incredibly versatile and strong.
If you have sciatica and are interested in doing this, you’re obviously a tough dude, but will benefit immensely from learning to ascend SRS/SRT. So much easier on your back, and your whole body for that matter - will liters buy you years more physical capacity. Watch Reg Coates’s video on the subject if you don’t believe me.
 
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