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Got Climbing Classes for HomeOwner?

Discussion in 'Recreational Tree Climbing' started by BillyB, Jul 14, 2017.

  1. BillyB

    BillyB ArboristSite Lurker

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    Location:
    Small Woods NE of St. Paul, MN
    I have a bunch of large oaks on my property I would love to prune and would like to learn how to do this safely the right way. I'm thinking a class would be a nice approach but am having difficulty finding one. Has anyone every heard of such a thing for homeowners? Can you put me on a trail to find a good one in Minnesota, preferably the St Paul/Minneapolis area?
     
  2. Del_

    Del_ I'm completely reformed.

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    I own my home and I took classes.

    I'm sure some of the guys rented or lived with their parents though.
     
  3. BillyB

    BillyB ArboristSite Lurker

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    Good to hear Del. Did you find them worthwhile? Who put them on, i.e. private arborists? DNR? some educational institution?, and how did you find them?
     
  4. LIG

    LIG ArboristSite Lurker

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    I took some AGMA mountain guide and rescue classes that help with rigging. Local climbing gyms will offer similar things. Depends if the instructors are good though and a belay lesson isn't going to cut it. John Long's climbing anchors was a good book. Also, lot of good stuff on youtube. Wesspur sells some decent dvd's - working climber. I'm sure with how advertised "tree stuff" *com is they'll be some books and dvd's on there. Real hard to recommend stuff just because of the danger of the activity and how few people is seems do it. A chainsaw will rip through a tensioned line (steel or not) in less than 1/2 second. You could rig something perfect, but judge the branch or tree wrong and break out of an anchor point. I like how you said Oak trees. Probably the best tree to start on. Very easy to see a dead vs living branch on that variety typically. And they're usually strong. A 4-5" branch usually can hold my 200lbs. Having said that I wouldn't rig a climbing line or catch line to anything less than the thickness of my thigh and if you do make sure the wood is stressed in the direction it grows not perpendicular.

    What would probably be really cool is if you could groundie for a local crew on the weekends and then practice in the tree with the climbers. Good luck.
     

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