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Got Extreme Cold Weather Parka?

Discussion in 'Off the Topic Forum' started by MontanaResident, Jan 30, 2019.

  1. MontanaResident

    MontanaResident Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Lets see them.

    This was purchased for me a few years ago, and I've only worn it a few times. Super
    warm, and a size larger then I normally wear, so I could wear a jacket underneath it also.

    Eddie Bauer, 650 Fill Power with Canada Goose fill.

    I had to pull it out of storage as my area is suppose to be getting our version of the Polar Vortex next week.

    ColdWeatherParka 002 (600x800).jpg ColdWeatherParka 004 (800x600).jpg ColdWeatherParka 005 (800x600).jpg
     
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  2. Groundman One

    Groundman One Star Gazer

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    Nice parka! :yes:

    For my part, I'm all about layers. If we're doing trees or roofs, you change temperature so fast and often you're always putting something on or taking something off.

    If it's truly cold and I'm out walking at night, I wear what's pictured below. No insulation, just a shell, but a fantastic wind breaker, really tough, and way too big. I can wear three or four layers of polar fleece underneath and not feel compressed. Tie the thing up, so to speak, and it's a nice bubble with lots of dead air inside for insulation. I love it.



    [​IMG]
     
  3. MontanaResident

    MontanaResident Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Layers I got. The coldest I have ever seen is 30 below. I didn't go outside. This parka is so heavy, I would bet I could do fine in 30 below without layers. But honestly, I would be just fine in never having to test my belief.

    I love all the huge pockets. Seems that it had sucked in quite a few possessions that I thought I had lost. Gloves, knit cap, muffler, a lower half face balaclava etc. were stashed away in this parka for a super cold event. My goto Polar Vortex solution in one.
     
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  4. 1Alpha1

    1Alpha1 100% USDA certified abnormality-free.

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    Depends on who's looking for me.....and why.
    Great looking coat you have there.

    In anticipation of the Arctic Vortex, I'll be wearing one of these, while I get a m/c ride in. :)

    19683_f_fl.jpg
     
  5. unclemoustache

    unclemoustache My 'stache is bigger than yours.

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    I got rid of my big parka. Been here in ILL-ugh-noise for 20 years and never needed it. I wish it would get cold. -3 this morning was nice, but not a good 'cold.'
    I want my lungs to hurt when I enhale.
     
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  6. 1Alpha1

    1Alpha1 100% USDA certified abnormality-free.

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    Depends on who's looking for me.....and why.
    I brought the one I had in the military home. Wasn't supposed to, but oh well.

    Damn thing was nice......I mean real nice. Back then, money was kind of tight, so I sold it to an Army / Navy surplus store. It's one of those things that I wish I still had. :nofunny:
     
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  7. unclemoustache

    unclemoustache My 'stache is bigger than yours.

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    LOL. That's what mine was, and obtained in the same way. Very nice coat indeed.
     
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  8. yooper

    yooper Tree Freak

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    IMG_1451.PNG
    Although there is no forty mile an hr gusts off the big lake to take away your breath
     
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  9. Little Al

    Little Al Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Good looking Jacket the only not want feature for me would be the fur collr/ hood edging Not good with snow /rain wetting it & ending a soggy "mush" around neck/face
     
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  10. MontanaResident

    MontanaResident Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Luckily it is removable. Also it is faux, but hopefully soon I'll get a coyote, tan it and have someone replace the faux with the real thing.
     
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  11. Little Al

    Little Al Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I guess if it was me I'd get a Coyote or other fur hat made with a potruding brim/rim ar la cowboy " jobbie"to keep the elements off ,the bestIve found is a "modded" wet/dry suit hood keeps head ears dry & warm & can wear a hard hat if required
     
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  12. MontanaResident

    MontanaResident Addicted to ArboristSite

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    It never rains and rarely snows when it gets cold enough that I wear this parka. I have two trapper hats (mad bomber), one faux and one fur, and the difference is not very noticeable, warmth or comfort.
     
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  13. Groundman One

    Groundman One Star Gazer

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    I have wool hats and socks, but it's all about the polar fleece sweaters and jackets. That stuff is the bomb!
     
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  14. holeycow

    holeycow Addicted to ArboristSite

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    When it gets really, really cold 30 below is a relief.

    The fur on the hood of a parka is there to break the wind around your face. It makes a huge difference on windy days. It makes a difference even on calm days. It also helps to reduce glare from the snow and sun somewhat, because snow blindness is a bad thing.

    A really good parka has wolverine fur on the hood, as wolverine fur doesn’t frost up like coyote or wolf. It also has a snow belt and inner cuffs of good elasticized wool in the sleeves. It has leather trimmed cuffs, double layered elbows, and the hood has a strap to make it adjustable forward and back. It has no velcro, as velcro is handy but has no place on a garment designed to last 30 years of everyday use with decent care.

    A good down parka combined with down bib overalls, good winter boots, mittens and proper layering underneath allows you to be quite comfortable in 50 below weather...as long as you don’t work into a sweat. Then you could freeze and die if you had to spend a night out.

    Really good winter gear is made of silk, cotton, wool, leather, down, and fur. Not plastic.

    Anyway, I thought I’d throw that out there as I have some experience with cold.

    Ps, I have a down parka packed away somewhere. It’s a decent one, but not a really good one. It’s only been -30 to -40 here the last little while and I’m only out for a couple of hours at a time, so I have no need of my warmest boots, gloves, or coats yet. Really. It’s all relative. Animals are amazing creatures that can get conditioned to extremes. I am hopeless in the heat. I don’t know how you desert dwellers do it. 85F is getting pretty darn warm to me.
     
  15. holeycow

    holeycow Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Well, I had a brief look for my parka. It’s stashed away somewhere. I couldn’t easily find the darn thing.

    I wanted to put a picture of it in this thread. Oh well. Sorry. It is a medium priced decent facsimile of a genuine work parka. It is not nearly as classy (and probably not as well made) as Montana’s parka shown above, but does have all of the little details that I mentioned necessary in a true arctic parka.

    In 2000 I worked a winter in the Arctic. We were issued very nice full-blown custom-made arctic wear which consisted of a down filled parka and bib overalls. Top quality stuff. The hood was huge! Big enough to put a helmet in! Ridiculous! Sledding around all day in 40 below or more wasn’t too bad at all as long as the heated handgrips were working. I am mildly claustrophobic. One cold day the zipper of the parka was frozen solid in front of my face at the bottom of the hood. I had the hood zipped right into a tube, as they do. I could not get the parka off with my cold hands and needed help to do so. Thinking about it still freaks me out a little. I was helplessly stuck in my parka with a helmet on so there was no way to pull the thing over my head, as the neck was far too small to get over and around the helmet.

    Many of the locals wore handmade down filled garments. The parkas were pull-overs (no zipper) with wolverine trimmed hoods. They also wore handmade, water proofed leather gauntlet mittens with the fur side in. Those were the warmest mittens I have ever seen. Most folks wore natural materials almost exclusively. Many had the warmest of handmade outerwear. At that time they did not trust synthetics much.

    Anyway, I hope I haven’t derailed this thread with my rambling. But this cold-weather gear is one of the few subjects I have a clue about.

    When I was seventeen I bought my first down-filled parka with my own money because I value that kind of gear. That was a “woods” brand parka that eventually became my wife’s chore parka some years later. It was small on me and big on her, but warm. Eventually, after about 20 years and a lot of use it was wore right out and falling apart.

    When I used to survey in the winter with a theodolite and a pencil I wore a parka every day all day. Most times it was down filled.

    The best winter thing to have which is cheaper,handier, and easier to store than a parka is a quality down-filled vest. I have a few.

    Combine a down-filled vest with a down-filled parka and down-filled overalls and 50 or more below becomes doable all day. Providing you have the boots and gloves to match.

    20 below right now going to near 40 below for the weekend, then warming to a steady -20 or so for a while next week. That will be a bit of a relief for the cows..and the humans too.

    Someday I will buy a parka like the op’s. Very, very nice as a going out kind-of a parka!
     
  16. Groundman One

    Groundman One Star Gazer

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    Pickin' a fight, are ya, Alberta? ;)

    I have to say I do like my polar fleece. I'm taking off and putting on layers endlessly when working in the winter, and fleece is great for layering. Tough enough to take a beating, get filthy dirty, and go right into the washer. I'd be lost without it. Like you, I can get a little claustrophobic in winter clothes. I like to wear a few sweaters and a few vests. I absolutely have to have the mobility in the arms. Using the saw or shoveling in a jacket drives me bonkers. For me, vests are the best.

    Usually I head out in two polar fleece sweaters, a polar fleece vest, and a Carhartt vest over that. If you're moving around, it takes quite a bit to put a chill through that. And sure enough the layers start dropping when the work gets going. I usually bring a jacket to throw over everything if I'm just standing around. I have a Carhartt coat and the big parka shell in the post I made up above.

    This is my work vest. Love it. Two secure zip up pockets, one in and one out. That's essential.

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. MontanaResident

    MontanaResident Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Everest was on the Tube yesterday. I had seen it before, but since reading Jon Krakauer's book, and his take on the tragic event, it was more intense seeing it again. Now those mountaineers had some gear. I don't recall seeing any Canada Goose Parkas, but about all else was shown. Damn, those guys must love being cold, for the bestest of the best gear, probably doesn't keep them warm, just alive, barely.

    Last night it was suppose to get below zero. Only got to 4 above. The tropics....
     
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  18. MontanaResident

    MontanaResident Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I also have a Carhartt vest, but without the hood. It is the only garment that I trust to hold up while carrying the big wood up against my stomach. Great canvas material, now going on 7 years.
     
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  19. holeycow

    holeycow Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Some of those Everest stories are downright sad. Those people are pretty much out of their minds, imo. The Korean party which had most of its members die is particularly troubling.
     
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  20. holeycow

    holeycow Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I was having a discussion about plastic winter clothes recently with a good friend who agrees with you. A Canadian Prairie guy who likes fleeces. I’ve had several. They are warm when they are new, but break down quickly compared to natural stuff, imo. That being said, really good quality plastic clothes do hold up pretty well.
     
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