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Granberg milling with an old 041AV

Discussion in 'Milling & Saw Mills' started by JDP, Apr 1, 2017.

  1. JDP

    JDP ArboristSite Lurker

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    Finished setting up a Granberg mill on my old Stihl 041AV. I welded the ladder clamps up and tried it out the other day. Good results so far! The 041 is a little small for this work, but it did the job. Now I need to get a longer bar and a ripping chain for my recently modded Husky 365 (I ground out the transfer restrictors and modded the muffler). I would like to come up with a better design for the center ladder support, currently I have to have multiple length bolts to match the log size.
     

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  2. SeMoTony

    SeMoTony Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Looks well done! Not familar w husky saws so I don't know how much more that is. I use ladder support for my alaskan ,and on first cut just use wood wedges where a gap exists. Once they are in place usually good to go. 2nd cut the ladder lays on log surface and use one or two pipe hanger straps to prevent slippage. Milling IMHO doesn't need the precision of planing dry planks a year or more down the road. I air dry so that is my time frame. Looks good, Think safe play safe work safe & enjoy on
     
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  3. JDP

    JDP ArboristSite Lurker

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    Thanks, so far so good! I'll try using just wedges under the ladder in the middle, my bolt solution seems problematic.
     
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  4. GaTreeStumper

    GaTreeStumper semi-poster, major lurker

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    Looks good!
     
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  5. JDP

    JDP ArboristSite Lurker

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    Finished milling out that Red Oak into a 6x6 post for my shop. It will replace a jack lally, much better looking!
    I also picked up an old Stihl 045 Super to be my dedicated milling saw, the old 041 was working pretty hard!
     

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  6. BobL

    BobL No longer addicted to AS

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    For better support along the log try nestling the ladder onto the log like this.
    Put the ladder on top of the log and mark where the rungs make contact with the log.
    A ruler applied to the side of the ladder will give you a depth guide for each notch.
    Remove the ladder and notch the log at the marks.
    That way you get support log the whole length of the ladder.
    Of course this is not going to work if the ladder is too wide for the log which is why I prefer to use a adjustable with frame

    It's worth taking the time to get t he first cut right as this determines how good the rest of your cuts are.

    layout2.jpg
     
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  7. GaTreeStumper

    GaTreeStumper semi-poster, major lurker

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    makes sense!
     
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  8. JDP

    JDP ArboristSite Lurker

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    Good info as always Bobl, I have a few more "practice" logs to experiment with, I'll give that a try. I was also considering cutting some wooden wedges and drilling a hole in the back of them. I could put an opposing pair under a few rungs and use the holes to screw then to the log.
     
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  9. tntatro

    tntatro ArboristSite Operative

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    I also mill with an 045 super. I actually have several 045/056 and mostly use an 056 super right now. I've never used a ladder before to make the first cut. I've always used nails and lay a board on top like in the picture. It works really well.
     

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  10. JDP

    JDP ArboristSite Lurker

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    That's a cool idea! How do you keep the board from sliding off? How do you get all the nail heads level, with a string?

     
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  11. tntatro

    tntatro ArboristSite Operative

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    On each end you hammer two notched nails in and level them. Make them about the same width apart. You can notch the nails with a chainsaw file and face the notches toward the end of the log. I like to measure from the pith to the top of the nails so both ends are the same distance from the pith to minimize grain runoff. I also measure the distance of the nails on each side and make them both the same distance and width for a little extra detail. Then pull a string on each side and stagger nails at the same height as the string. I use 5" nails (40d bright common).

    The board sometimes moves around from the vibration but I just move it back. I use a pine board about 3/4" x 10" x 8'. A thin pine board will flatten to the bed of nails if it has a little warp in it. This method takes a little longer to set up than other methods but the cuts are nice and straight and you can mill a log of any length. You just slide the board down as needed.

    If you want an edged log then you can turn the flat surface from the first cut 90 degrees and put a level on it to make it plumb, then when you repeat the process for the second slab you will have a 90 degree edge. You can also use a Mini Mill to edge a log. If you like to build stuff then you can set your mill to 4", 6" or 8" and cut slabs then turn them on edge and set your mill to 2" and cut 2 x materials. You can also put washers between the cross piece on your mill attachment to make a tapered cut and mill tapered siding. By centering the pith you can also box the pith for quality beams for a timber frame structure. Making building materials makes a good use for logs like spruce and pine.

    If you mill a hard wood you have to pre drill for the nails or you will not be able to pull them from the slab after.
     

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  12. JDP

    JDP ArboristSite Lurker

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    I'll give that a try and add it to my bag of tricks. I like the sturdiness and low friction of the ladder for shorter stuff, but that looks like a great way to do longer logs. Many ways to skin the cat, er, log!
     
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  13. rarefish383

    rarefish383 Addicted to ArboristSite

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  14. chenangokid

    chenangokid ArboristSite Lurker

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  15. chenangokid

    chenangokid ArboristSite Lurker

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    That is,a good idea but that is not a regular ladder as it looks to me
    The rungs are small rods
    But it looks like it works great
    I used 2 bys that were planed and I made L brackets that I screw into the ends of logs
     
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  16. rarefish383

    rarefish383 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    The rails with the rods are not a ladder. It's a custom set of rails that Bobl made. The "all thread" can be adjusted for the width of the log. Welcome to the site, have fun, that's what it's all about.
     
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  17. csmillingnoob

    csmillingnoob ArboristSite Member

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    I basically just built a custom wooden ladder on and straddling the top of the last log I milled. Sorry, I don't have pics. Hopefully, this explanation will be coherent.

    I always used a ladder until I milled this 12'6" log that was longer than my ladder section and I have two slabs presold at 12" length. I like overhang! So, I bought two very straight 2x6x16s and cut them to 14' so I would have a good mounting and unmounting overhang on each end.

    I went to the small end of the log and drew a level line just above the pith, then measured up to the point where I would have the maximum number of 9/4 boards (and 3/8 kerf for each.) There, I marked a level line and attached a 32" 2x6 across the top of that line with torque screws. The top of that 2x6 end piece protruded above the log about 2-1/2 inches.Then, I cut trimmed that board to the exact width of the log top.

    Went to the wide end and repeated the process. Because the narrow end lateral piece was 2-1/2 inches above the log, I got lucky and the lateral piece at the wide end was about a half inch above the log- thus, no freehand top trimming was needed.

    Attached the two 14 footers to the two lateral end pieces to complete the frame. Next I put in two 2x6 "rungs." These rested in two low spots on top of the log and well below the top of my "ladder" frame. Threw in two more rungs made from 2x4 scraps that still rested on the log and left enough to screw into my "ladder" frame. Sag eliminated.

    After the first cut, I took out the rungs. I lay the two 14s on the edges of the log top and screwed them in at the ends. The weight of the mill and saw keep them flat in the center but a screw or two will take out any bows that might develop. These used 2x6s can be used for my next drying frame.
     
  18. SeMoTony

    SeMoTony Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Thursday or Friday this was the setup 20190917_075435.jpg
    Pointing at the 3rd rung is the 1st 3" thick slab supporting the bottom round that will give up a few more thin slices. Different than BobL's, using a ladder as close to center, on the 1st slice to keep the handle on the mill frame close to center or a bit away. That lets me pressure down onto ladder holding that relationship all the way down the cut while pushing against the push of the cutters on top. A habit I got into at the beginning that throws chips away from operator and is the self-oiled side.
    To each their own 20190912_163146.jpg nice height 20190912_084825.jpg for milling, but needed to avoid further damage to the ramp on a borrowed trailer.
    Enjoy milling safely Ya'll
     

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