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Growing your own axe handle.

WRW

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I'd debarked it to rid it of any bugs. Paint the ends to slow drying. Plan on the wood shrinking with drying. It'll need a wedge to keep the head tight.

We used boiled linseed oil on wooden handled implements, but I just read that in has some undesirable chemicals in it. My next finish to research would be a spar varnish.
 

Del_

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Thanks Bill.

I've found six or seven axe heads here on the property, some are double bit. The house is 150 years old. Some are in really bad shape and rusted. Also a few 'homemade' wedges. All kinds of metal parts tractor/plow parts are spread around the property.

I wish I'd set up more heads on hickories back when I did this one. Maybe I'll do it this winter.

Is hickory best?

I've got lots of red oak saplings and wild cherry, too.

Do you think I may have 'picked' it a little early?

The tree was starting to look unhealthy I think due to be girdled.
 
Flint Mitch

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Very cool!! I'm going to try this myself. I have a few shag bark babies around to pick from

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

WRW

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Thanks Bill.

I've found six or seven axe heads here on the property, some are double bit. The house is 150 years old. Some are in really bad shape and rusted. Also a few 'homemade' wedges. All kinds of metal parts tractor/plow parts are spread around the property.

I wish I'd set up more heads on hickories back when I did this one. Maybe I'll do it this winter.

Is hickory best?

I've got lots of red oak saplings and wild cherry, too.

Do you think I may have 'picked' it a little early?

The tree was starting to look unhealthy I think due to be girdled.
Hickory has a good reputation. I have seen ash used, but I've seen it split. I'd guess oak would share that tendency and cherry would not stand up well at all.

Never having seen this technique, I couldn't pass judgement on any aspect other than admiration for trying.
 

Del_

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Well, shrinkage may be a problem. Time will tell on that. Any thoughts on making a kerf for a wedge to tighten the handle in the head?
I will have to look into how making a kerf is done. I don't want to remove the handle from the head if I don't have to.

Does it need the kerf cut before it seasons?
 
Atean

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Should be no rush on creating a kerf. I would think it best to wait, and I'd like to see if the wood above the head is beneficial.
I think the most I would add is a iron or steel wedge after much drying, if and when needed. Handle may be smoothed with spud and shave. Don't trust my memory but hackmatock best handle,after what ash definitely works. Beech for mallethead I believe.
 

sb47

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Now that's amusing indeed. I'm sure it's gonna be weak and break if you try and use it but it's a ingenious idea.I would hang it on the wall for a conversation piece.
 
ray benson

ray benson

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Update? How did it work out. Years ago I hand split all my firewood and my dad's firewood. Made handles out of White Oak saplings for 8 and 10 pound sledge hammers and a 6 pound maul. They never lasted as good as the store bought hickory handles.
 
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