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Hand Toss Measurement

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by PTS, Feb 21, 2006.

  1. PTS

    PTS ArboristSite Guru

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    Firwood Hand Toss Measurement

    I read in a book about a study done on the east coast years ago, that entailed hand tossing firewood into a bin over and over to determine an approximate measurement of a cord that wasn't stacked. It seems to me like it was 190 cubic feet. This would be helpful as most of our customers have large trailers or trucks (farming community) and we generally load with a skid loader or sometimes hand toss. Measuring up there hauler and just loading with having to stack measure would take a lot of labor out of the equation.

    Does anybody know this number. I have been trying to find it but can't remember which book it was in.

    Thanks,

    Kyle
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2006
  2. Kate Butler

    Kate Butler ArboristSite Guru

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    When I first read the thread's title, I was expecting to find something about throw bags. When I opened the thread I found something IMMENSELY more
    useful for those of us who cut & load firewood by hand.

    Kyle, may I respectfully suggest that you rename the thread to include the word "firewood" (i.e. firewood hand toss measurement) to help out anyone using the search function. The reason? Regionally, many folks say "throw" or "heave" instead of "toss".

    Before I wrote this, went to the search function and searched "hand throw". It was interesting, but didn't bring up this thread. The answer contained in this thread is really useful and shouldn't be lost or hard to find.

    Thanks so much for the info, I've been looking for it for some time.
     
  3. tawilson

    tawilson Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I actually tossed a 180 cubic foot of wood into my dump trailer then stacked it and I got just over a cord, 128 cubic feets.
     
  4. jnsn

    jnsn ArboristSite Lurker

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    I believe that the measurement you are speaking of was developed by the state of Maine. I'm sure that I have seen it on the state website in an area about wood sales. I'll see if I can track it down.
     
  5. jnsn

    jnsn ArboristSite Lurker

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    OK I found it by doing a search for "cord" on the Maine state site. For wood 12"
    to 16" a loose cord is 180 cubic feet. For 24" wood it is 195 cubic feet. So i guess I could make it in one trip if I made a plywood box 4 feet tall around the pick-up.
     
  6. ray benson

    ray benson Tree Freak

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    Bangor Daily News - November 2004
    With the heating season here once again, Maine's attorney general is reminding consumers of regulations pertaining to the sale of firewood. Under state law, firewood must be sold in one of three allowable units: standard cord, cubic foot, or loose-thrown wood.

    A standard cord is a unit of measure of wood products 4 feet wide, 4 feet high and 8 feet long, or its equivalent, containing 128 cubic feet when the wood is well-stacked. A cubic foot is simply a unit of volume measuring 1 foot by 1 foot by 1 foot.

    A cord of loose, unstacked wood occupies 180 cubic feet if the wood averages 12 or 16 inches in length, and 195 cubic feet if the wood averages 24 inches in length.

    Maine law also requires a delivery of firewood to be accompanied by a delivery ticket that states the name of the seller, name of the purchaser, the delivery time, the quantity delivered, and the quantity upon which the price is based. The delivery ticket must always show whether the wood is sold by the standard cord, the cubic foot, or the loose-thrown cord.
     
  7. wradman

    wradman ArboristSite Operative

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    thrown cord

    thanks for the info been wanting to know that for quite some time.
    does it make a differnce it the wood is split or not?
     
  8. Newfie

    Newfie Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Those figures are for split wood.
     
  9. clearance

    clearance Addicted to ArboristSite

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    This is a good move, enough of the "pickup load" of wood for X $, what does that mean? A cord of wood is 4x4x8, that means a fullsize pickup with an 8' box, stacked from the cab to the tailgate, about 1' more or less above the cab. That is a pretty good load, especially if you just cut it, wieghs down a 3/4 ton. A "pickup load" in a half ton ain't no full cord, you can bet on it.
     

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