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help, why am I grooving

Mad Professor

Mad Professor

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I know the high quality as I have several of their 9 and 10 pin race pin sprockets. Never used them.


I tried water drip and even a hose connected up to the nose with one of those click fittings. I didn't do it because of heat - I was just being a tight ass to see if I could reduce the expenses of running an aux oiler.


No - I tried to get one back in 2010 but my local GB supplier said he couldn't get anything like that - maybe they came in later?

A great company that went out of business, Left Coast Supplies, had the GB 3/8 picco bars in all sorts of lengths (16-40+"). Prices were super cheap too. I picked up some 25" bars for ~ $22 USD each. They also had 25" 63PMX milling chain loops for ~$20.

I wish I had stocked up more heavily.
 
chainsaw papa

chainsaw papa

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3921FDDE-03EF-4161-A860-481088618D5D.jpeg
On the BIL mill the flow of my oil is adjustable from the milling position via a bicycle gear change lever and cable that has 7 click positions and this opens and closes a valve on the oiler.
Hey BobL thanks for the pictures that's a real sweet looking set up, very convenient having the gear lever by the milling handle.

Thats a black poly irrigation fitting and a piece of threaded rod through the piece of steel strap. This enables the height to be adjusted so the gap is ~1/16" so the oil does not drop but wicks out direct onto the bar/chain.
It was great seeing how you attched that to the bar clamp. I had an extra air tool fitting and thought it would also work great and then thought about using the articulating style as seen on the gun here. My thoughts were it would just hang straight down if the vibration effected it otherwise I would be really able to dial in the wick location and if it stays in place angle it with the chain direction to maybe pull more oil into the chain. I just have to add a threaded piece to put the nuts on and control the height as shown in the one you made your friend.

Sufficient B&C oiling is important in keeping the bar cool specially in dry wood. In some of the stuff I mill more resin from the wood is extracted by hotter chain and this clings to the chain like glue making it even hotter due to the increased friction. To counteract this, when the cut is finished I let the oiler run with the chain running out of the wood at its slowest seep so it doesn't fling off any oil - once the chain is glistening with oil I stop, refuel and do my chain touch. By the start of the next cut any remaining hard oiled resin has softened and just peels off in the first inch or so of the new cut.
Some more great advice, I have noticed some build up on my chains as well even tho the wood has been old. I was tending to shut my drip off as I got to the end of the cut to drain the line and not make a mess but I understand now how it would be beneficial to leave on a bit .

Where in NE are you? I venture between VT and western MA.
I'm in south eastern CT, Takes two hours to get to Mt. Monadnock, or Mt Greylock. I used to get out your way alot more for hiking and camping but were over run with babies right now. Crawford notch campground was four hours away and Acadia was about eight with gas stops and lunch. How about your self?
 

ML12

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Feb 17, 2016
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Vancouver, BC
I seem to get a lot of grooving with skip chain, and not much at all with full comp. Just my observation. The skip is also Oregon ripping chain (semi chisel) while the full comp is stihl RS3 or whatever the full chisel option is.

We only got skip because we thought there would be an issue with the 60" bar, but there isn't so next loop will be full comp.
 
chainsaw papa

chainsaw papa

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Thanks ML12 Thats the same reason I started with the skip chain thinking the 461 would be a little under powered. It really did just fine and reduced my cut time in half. I was going to get a skip chain made up for the 36 inch bar tho to not stress the power head out too much unless anyone else has experience with that saw with a 36 inch in hard wood. Thanks again
 
chainsaw papa

chainsaw papa

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Hello again,
Bob L I was wondering if you could take a glance at my chain again for me I filed all my teeth to 30 degrees on the grandberg jig but the hook looks alittle aggressive compared to the stock teeth. I also picked up that angle finder from your video and tried setting them all as close to six degrees as I could get it. I was wondering how I did with it as It took some getting use to. I love the accuracy I'll eventually get with using it. I did have a couple that went closer to six and a half seven and I was wondering is that alright or should take a couple swipes off the teeth to bring it back down. I also dressed the bar out and am hoping this all improves my problem, I still have a couple weeks before I can get back out there tho.Thanks again for all your help.
 

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andy at clover

andy at clover

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Papa

Kudos for putting in the effort!
The hooks are a bit sharp but you should not change them before running the chain.
The chain should cut nicely but dull a bit more quickly.
 
chainsaw papa

chainsaw papa

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Thanks Andy I'm all about putting in the work and hope results continue to follow. I also reworked my aux oiler and fabed a bracket up for a more precise application which seams to apply it much better.

So what was I doing wrong to create such an aggressive hook? Was I filling in to deeply, or did I set the file up a tad too low? I figured I would start out at the stihl standard 30 degrees and go down by five degrees over time and see how the saw responds.
 
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