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HF Chain Grinder Thread

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by Philbert, Dec 13, 2014.

  1. 67L36Driver

    67L36Driver Tree Freak

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    The minor modification is the best thing I've done to 'Nick'.
    [​IMG]
    Made him a lot more consistent tooth to tooth and side to side.
    Rocked chain before.
    [​IMG]
    After:
    [​IMG]
    Could be a smoother surface but don't want to spend the moola on junk chains.
     
  2. Efisher26

    Efisher26 Tinkerer

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    Anyone know if the elec chain sharpener disks at tractor supply fit the harbour freight setup?


    -•------------------------------------------------------------


    Just a home owner that likes the older better made machines

    Craftsman 3.7
    Echo 290evl
    Husqvarna 36
     
  3. Philbert

    Philbert Chainsaw Enthusiast

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    No way to know for sure (see posts on wheel ID variance). Some of these stores switch vendors.

    Best thing to do is take your grinder to the store and ask if you can test fit. Or just open the package carefully and keep your receipt.

    Philbert
     
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  4. 67L36Driver

    67L36Driver Tree Freak

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    I had to shim the bore on an evilbay wheel bore.
     
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  5. psjwi

    psjwi ArboristSite Member

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    I didn't read every post in this thread so maybe this has already been mentioned...but in regard to idea about using super glue to tighten up the pivot:

    I just bought one of these and it had a lot of slop in the hinge. Not knowing that someone had already mentioned it, I thought that using thin super glue along with the accelerant made to immediately setup the glue might work to take up the slack. If it worked, it would be a quick (maybe not permanant) fix.

    I pulled out the pin and cleaned it up with brake cleaner - put it back in - put a few drops of thin CA glue in both ends and sprayed the area with the "kicker" chemical to set the glue. I made sure to operate it up and down right away to (hopefully) make sure it didn't lock up tight.

    Well it tried to glue itself into a permanant position - but you have a lot of leverage and the glue doesn't have much to grab onto on the pin - so it was pretty easy to break free. But it was so tight that it would no longer spring back. I put a drop or two of oil on the pin in the center area of the pivot (apparently the glue had flowed into the center area as well but that is where it broke free - the two ends of the pin were glued tight) and let it set for a while and now it springs back and there is no slop at all. Of course the plastic still has a tiny bit of flex but (at least for the time being) that pivot pin slop is totally gone.

    Try this at your own risk...no guarantee that this will turn out good for everyone;)
     
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  6. Philbert

    Philbert Chainsaw Enthusiast

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    BUMP

    (just because)

    Philbert
     
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  7. Philbert

    Philbert Chainsaw Enthusiast

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    Had to happen . . .

    Cordless, 18V version.

    IMG_1893.JPG

    Philbert
     
  8. Philbert

    Philbert Chainsaw Enthusiast

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    Another one joins the club! Followed me home last night ('Nick at Nite'!) - shown before clean up (and Silvey sickers).

    Now I also have a 'Nick the Grinder' grinder, just like @67L36Driver !
    Nick the Grinder 1.jpg Nick the Grinder 2.jpg Nick the Grinder 3.jpg

    Appears to be identical to the old Harbor Freight 'Chicago Electric' grinders (which I like better) except made in Italy. Also very similar to a generic, eBay version I bought (post #134).

    Philbert
     
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  9. 67L36Driver

    67L36Driver Tree Freak

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    Put ‘Nick’ in a box and send him here.

    I got a new HF grinder waiting in the wings. I’ll prolly just transfer over the chain vice. Not liking the bicycle brake handle.
     
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  10. Philbert

    Philbert Chainsaw Enthusiast

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    Me neither. Liked the 'idea', but not in use - posted lots of comments on that.
    I keep looking out for these versions on CL; new ones available for about $30-40 on eBay (no endorsement implied).
     
  11. Wood Doctor

    Wood Doctor Edwin

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    It never ceases to amaze me how many guys look for options to file sharpening chains when in the field. There has to be a reason for this. Think of the number of files you can buy for $80. Gasp!

    And, think of the number of chains you can grind sharpen in the shop and bring to the field, ready to switch after you hit the ground or an embedded nail.
     
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  12. Huskybill

    Huskybill Addicted to ArboristSite

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    The only time I used my Oregon chain grinder was to repair saw chain teeth after hitting metal in the wood. I would replace the bad teeth and grind them all so there all the same size. Only on newer chains. The rest of the time I use files.
     
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  13. jakethesnake

    jakethesnake ArboristSite Guru

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    Good thread
     
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  14. rd35

    rd35 Just an average Joe's brother!!

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    My theory on why so many folks prefer "field sharpening" is because I think most folks want the security of knowing if they dull a chain they can sharpen it right then and there. And, if they dull the chain again and again....they can still sharpen over and over as needed. As for me....I take three razor sharp chains (minimum) with me every time I go out to woods. Soon as one starts showing signs of getting dull I swap chains. So here's what I find interesting....I have had several hand filers tell me they avoid having their chains ground because they want them to last longer. So what's strange is that ever since I started grinding my chains....I find they actually last much much longer than before. I can re-sharpen a chain as many as 10 times (assuming I can avoid dirt, rocks, and fence wire) before the cutters get so short they begin to break off. And the very last sharpening on a chain (before it gets tossed in the scrap metal bin) lasts just as long and cuts just as fast as a new chain. Coolest part is that the bottoms of the side plates and cutters (where they slide along the bar rails) don't seem to wear away as much as you would expect. I believe this is likely due to the fact that by keeping the chain sharp those surfaces don't see as much load or stress. If I have to push down on the saw to get it to cut...I stop and put another chain on the saw. Oh, and I have not needed to dress a guide bar on any of my saws for years. They don't get rolled edges any more. Absolutely amazes me how much less maintenance is required on bars and chains if the chains are kept sharp.
    Now don't get me wrong....if you like filing your chains by hand then that's great! It's sort of an art form and there are some real artists out there who can do a wicked good job making a chain razor sharp by hand. As for me, well I'm just not that steady anymore. I need lots of mechanical assistance to keep things consistent as well as square, level, and plumb!!! ;)
     
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  15. MustangMike

    MustangMike Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I like to do my own filing (square), by hand, unless the chain is badly rocked, but I'm usually working an a place I can drive close to, so I bring extra saws and swap if one gets dull or rocked.

    If I were going deep into the woods with one saw I would definitely bring extra chains.

    Agree with all the comments about keeping the chain sharp, and will add using good chain oil is also important, and these things also will help your powerhead last a lot longer (as it will run cooler).
     
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  16. rd35

    rd35 Just an average Joe's brother!!

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    Yep! Absolutely! Good chain lube is a "must have"!!

    I had been cutting firewood for myself and my parents for several year before I finally got serious about learning the theory behind how a saw chain works. Cutting firewood was always a chore that I had begun to dislike because my saw was unreliable, chain would never cut correctly, and it took forever to get the 45 ricks cut for both of our outdoor furnaces. One day I told my wife, "I've had it up to here! (holding my hands flat up near my chin)....I'm going to do some research and find out how to sharpen a chain proper....and then I'm getting myself a chain grinder!!!!!" Two weeks later, my NT grinder arrived. I had read all the info I could find on this forum along with some articles written by the folks at Carlton chain! I set up that grinder and started sharpening the chain off my recently acquired MS260. When I finished sharpening that chain (must have taken me 45 minutes...newbie) I put it on the saw. It was razor sharp, all the angles correct, rakers at .025. Took the saw over to my Dad's woodpile. Dad came out to see what would happen! Fired it up, warmed the engine for a minute or two, and tore into a 16" readoak log. That saw ripped through that solid red oak like it was soft pine. Big pretty chips pouring out the bottom of the clutch cover. Dad's mouth dropped wide open as, half way through the cut, I removed my left hand from the handlebar and let the saw continue cutting at an amazing rate under its own weight.
    It was at that very moment I realized cutting firewood would never be the same again. It was at that very moment I contracted an incurable case of CADD. My new hobby had become chain sharpening, saw tuning, and firewood cutting!!!!! Also went out and bought a nice hydraulic log splitter. My wife even enjoys helping me work firewood...probably because of my improved attitude!!! (But she's still not convinced I need 20 chainsaws in the shop)
     
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  17. 67L36Driver

    67L36Driver Tree Freak

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    Tell her you need eighty and compromise at thirty.

    Added #3 to the pile. Another freebie.
    [​IMG]

    I got it from Jeff’s Small Engines. When one sells so many Forrester bars, one gets a free sharpener.
     
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  18. Philbert

    Philbert Chainsaw Enthusiast

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    That Forrester is supposed to be s copy or equivalent of the Oregon 310 grinder (?).

    The one I tried worked much better with a coarser, replacement Oregon wheel (made in Italy), than the fine grit, OEM wheel.

    Philbert
     
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  19. jerrycmorrow

    jerrycmorrow Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Just read your signature. Love it. Rather than spill the meaning I’ll let others do their own research
     
  20. rd35

    rd35 Just an average Joe's brother!!

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    Yep! There's only a small portion of the population that can interpret that quasi-latin term! Keep your stick on the ice!!!!
     

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