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How can I make the cycle time faster on this log splitter

How can I make the cycle time faster on this log spilitter


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cantoo

cantoo

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20190321_155517.jpg I changed all my 1/2" lines to 3/4" lines to hopefully speed things up. The 2 stage pump is a 1/2" fitting and the darn 36" cylinder is 1/2" fittings but the hole inside the cylinder is barely 1/4". It made no different at all. I had my splitter in the shop doing some other upgrades on it ( I just installed auto cycle a few weeks ago) I made a bigger cradle to stage the logs and I was standing there thinking that a floor board to rest my foot on while I wait for the cylinder to retract would be handy. Then I thought that's crazy I really need to speed this thing up. I'm planning to remove the cylinder and get it sent out to be drilled out for true 3/4" fittings and lines then maybe a bigger engine and pump? Has a 13 hp with 15 GPM 2 stage pump on it right now. It is fast enough but I've improved everything else so much that the cycle time seems slow again. This is a 4 1/2 hour pile of 32" splits.
 
hedge hog

hedge hog

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If you guys would study the 15,000 -80,000$ splitters there key to getting fast cycle times is the cylinder
4.5 inch cylinder 25-28 tons.......
Most out there with a 1” to2” ram
The same cylinder with a 3.5 inch ram (or rod ) will have a 1/2 the cycle time
Because the ram is replacing the fluid that need to pumped into it
So if a 4.5 cylinder 24” stoke holds 1 gallon of fluid at full stroke and the return stoke with a 3” ram holds a little over a quart with 15 gallon minute pump
The total cycle time is reduced because for the ram size and it’s all in the return stroke
And it’s the safest way to have fast cycle time




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kevin j

kevin j

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If possible, take a screen shot and add to a .doc or jpeg/gif and post it that way. When we open it we can zoom in.
that would only be a pic of a given combination of numbers.
my goal is for anyone to download and run their own calcs to see what changes create what results.
 
esshup

esshup

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Would changing the viscosity of the hyd oil make any difference in speed or cause more problems? Reason for asking is that I noticed a hyd leak under my Troy-Bilt 27t splitter. About a drop every 1-2 seconds when running. So, it's time to clean all the crud off, and see where the leak is coming from & fix it. Since the owners manual says don't mix fluids, and I can't find exactly what fluid they recommend locally, I have to do a complete fluid flush and swap. All the hydraulic fluid I can find at the local farm store either has no weight rating or is only 20 wt, where the owners manual says 32 wt.

If I could find a trunion mount 4" dia, 24" stroke cylinder that had 25T of pressure and a 3.5" rod, with 3/4" lines I'd think about swapping out the ram. As it is, I don't see doing anything much more than that to mine due to the small engine size. It'd be better to start fresh or build my own. I can't see spending the $$ on a new motor, pump and cylinder I don't think it's worth it.
 
kevin j

kevin j

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viscosity wont make any difference.

You can mix fluids as long as they’re the same types. a log splitter application is pretty simple. if you have a good petroleum base in there now just use a good hydraulic fluid to add to it. if the fluid is deteriorated or oxidized that’s a whole different story
 
ChoppyChoppy

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Would changing the viscosity of the hyd oil make any difference in speed or cause more problems? Reason for asking is that I noticed a hyd leak under my Troy-Bilt 27t splitter. About a drop every 1-2 seconds when running. So, it's time to clean all the crud off, and see where the leak is coming from & fix it. Since the owners manual says don't mix fluids, and I can't find exactly what fluid they recommend locally, I have to do a complete fluid flush and swap. All the hydraulic fluid I can find at the local farm store either has no weight rating or is only 20 wt, where the owners manual says 32 wt.

If I could find a trunion mount 4" dia, 24" stroke cylinder that had 25T of pressure and a 3.5" rod, with 3/4" lines I'd think about swapping out the ram. As it is, I don't see doing anything much more than that to mine due to the small engine size. It'd be better to start fresh or build my own. I can't see spending the $$ on a new motor, pump and cylinder I don't think it's worth it.
The large rod cylinders aren't a typical "off the shelf" cylinder.

Could call a processor outfit and buy one I'd imagine. I forget what a replacement cost on the Blockbuster 18-20, I have in mind about $900 with shipping.

Aw32 or aw46 will be the common hydraulic oil viscosities.
 
muddstopper

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When you start putting bigger rods in cyl, you also have to start thinking about adding a dump valve for the returning oil. Putting bigger ports in a cyl isnt that big a deal. If you can take apart and put back together a cyl, own a drill and a welder, its something you can do yourself. Buying a cyl with a oversized rod is expensive, but depending on how resourceful one is and what junk can be found locally, one doesnt have to spend a arm and leg to come up with what they want/need. the scrap yards are full of, (not as much as they used to be) scraped out excavators, dozers, and such. Find one that has a cyl with the rod size you want. Take the rod to a machine shop and let them cut the cap of your current cyl to accept the larger rod, its possible they can cut down and rethread the cap off the larger cyl to fit your smaller cyl. They can thread the piston end of the rod to accept the piston out of your current smaller cyl. While the cyl is apart, redrill and weld in the larger ports. Add new seals assemble and your done. Your out the cost of the junk yard cyl and the machine work, but it should be a lot cheaper than buying a new specialty cyl.
 
cantoo

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I'm thinking of buying a smaller cylinder for my splitter as I'm only splitting ash anyway. I'll use sleeves on pins so that the cylinders are interchangeable when the Ash runs out. Driving by Princess Auto tomorrow morning so it might be difficult to stop the truck from turning in.
Today splits are this side of the pile. 70 logs 13'- 2" cut at 16" long. 6 1/2 hours of splitting. 20190325_160920.jpg
 
rancher2

rancher2

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Cantoo
If I were you I would save my money and not buy another hyd cylinder. If you are going to be splitting a lot of ash for several years I would just pickup a kinetic splitter and be done with it. Years ago when the speed pro hit the fan I got a pair that was bound for the scrap yard. One got a hyd conversion and a buddy is still using it today. The other I reworked with a jack shaft to slow the pinion down and we split lots of ash with that for several years until the ash trees ran out on the farm we were working on. I sold it then. If I were you I would look for a used SS or if you can't find one buy a new one use it until the ash runs out and sell it for close to what you paid for it.
 
muddstopper

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Funny, first time I have seen anybody suggest that a SS was good for ash, but you need something else if your splitting other types of wood. Trying not to form a opinion on this subject.
 
esshup

esshup

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Thanks guys re: the hydro fluid. I changed it all out just because it was a few years since last changed. Changed engine oil too since it's been a year. Now that brings up another question. During the fluid change, I noticed that the hydraulic tank is NOT vented. When I unscrewed the dipstick (it's on the inside of a 3/4" pipe plug) some air "whooshed" out of the tank. (Troy-Bilt 27t splitter).

I thought the tanks were all supposed to be vented?
 
cantoo

cantoo

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rancher2, I've got 5 or 8 splitters now so shouldn't really get another one. ( I buy and sell stuff on the side, only an idiot would have 5 to 8 splitters. I do have around 20 saws though, I'm a collector not an idiot) I built this splitter for 32" splits for my OWB and decided I might as well sell some 16" ash before it all rots so made it to do that too. I can split enough wood for my own use in about 12 hours of splitting so I "want" a faster splitter I don't "need" a faster splitter. I had a couple of close calls yesterday splitting wood and I blamed it on me getting rammy trying to speed thigs up. Once the mud dries up and I can get back to the bush I will forget about splitting for awhile.
Mudd, kinetic splitters really shine on easily split wood where as hydraulics are designed to tear or cut tough stuff apart. Either one will work on the other wood but the kinetic will struggle on crotchy twisted crap and the hydraulic will feel molasses slow on wood that splits as soon as the wedge touches it if you cycle it the whole way. Kind of like using a Echo to cut meat and a Stihl to cut wood, that's what each is designed for but you can switch it up and it will still get the job done. Now Huskies, they are just boat anchors. :)
 
rancher2

rancher2

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Years ago I did a lot of buying and selling of equipment and vehicles. Theirs some good money to be made. I don't do much these days. I still won't past up a good deal at a garage sale or estate sale. I currently have a splitter I bought last summer at a moving sale cheap. Its a old one that U haul rented out in the 80's runs and splits great just needs cleaned up serviced and painted. I was planning on getting it ready to sell for winter then other things got in the way.
 
esshup

esshup

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Update:

I don't know what kind of mud dauber will plug a 1/16" dia hole, but it was plugged tight. Had to take a small drill bit and clean out the hole from both ends and keep blowing thru the hole until it was clear. There is a small "L" shaped hole drilled in the pipe plug that is used as the dipstick cap.

Thanks again guys!!!!!
 
hedge hog

hedge hog

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It doesn’t look like it has a riser and if it doesn’t screw a 6” nipple on it and screw the cap on it and shove a beer can on over it.


(A empty one)


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