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How do you replace the oil line on a stihl?

Tree94

Tree94

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Trying to figure out why my stihl 391 isn't oiling.

How in the hell do you go about replacing the oil line/the hose that carries the oil from tank to oil pump?

For 1, its frustrating as hell trying to get to it through the small hole where you put the oil in.
2, I cant tell if the hose is two pieces, or just one?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
 
Philip Wheelock

Philip Wheelock

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You've probably checked to see if the saw is oiling without the guide bar/chain mounted and that, if the bar is not OEM, the oil port lines up with the delivery port on the saw. If no oil, then the problem will be one of the following parts which must be accessed by removing the clutch assembly: the worm/spring assembly, the oil pump/elbow connector, or the oil hose/pickup. The oil hose is one piece, and is replaced by removing the oil pump and pulling it out from the clutch side.
 
Tree94

Tree94

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I took the oil pump off and inspected it, and the worm gear. All looked good. I reassembled it all and tried to run the saw again. Still not oiling.
Then I figured I'd try to inspect the hose but I could not for the life of me figure out how to take it off. But what you said makes perfect sense now. That I should be able to pull the hose out from the clutch side.
I'm going to give that a go when I get home. Thanks.
 
Tree94

Tree94

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So I should be able to just pull the oil hose out from the clutch side, correct?
Its not screwed in or nothing?
It should just be a nice snug fit and I can just yank it out?
 
Philip Wheelock

Philip Wheelock

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So I should be able to just pull the oil hose out from the clutch side, correct?
Its not screwed in or nothing?
It should just be a nice snug fit and I can just yank it out?
You should be able to find a parts diagram online that will give you an idea what you're looking at. On my ms460, there's a tab on the hose that you pry up and grab with needle nose pliers and just pull it out. The pickup will come with it. Don't remove the pickup unless you have to; the hose can get ripped in the process.
 
Tree94

Tree94

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Why are you replacing the line? Is it cracked? If it is clogged, did you try blowing some air through it? Try cleaning it out?
to be honest. I tore it.
I attempted to inspect the oil filter for a clog but I could not figure out how to grab it through the oil hole.
so I used tie wire as a hook and needle nose pliers to grab it and pull it up.
then out of frustration I yanked on it pretty good and ripped the line a tad.
now im assuming the small rip will jeopardize the suction of oil so I figure I better replace it.

I've never had this problem so this is all new to me.
 
Tree94

Tree94

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now I feel stupid after learning that the hose pulls through from the other side next to the clutch though... oh well. :omg:
 
jr27236

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to be honest. I tore it.
I attempted to inspect the oil filter for a clog but I could not figure out how to grab it through the oil hole.
so I used tie wire as a hook and needle nose pliers to grab it and pull it up.
then out of frustration I yanked on it pretty good and ripped the line a tad.
now im assuming the small rip will jeopardize the suction of oil so I figure I better replace it.

I've never had this problem so this is all new to me.
Well if you ripped it, then you definitely have to replace it now. I would do as in the other replies as how to remove. I personally never did one myself so I have no experience to share. Goodluck
 
Chainsaw Jim

Chainsaw Jim

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It comes out pretty easy after you remove the oil pump.
If you have trouble getting oil to flow again then let the saw sit on its side with the bar and oil cap off for a few minutes or longer. The pump doesn't move air and will not prime itself. You can also blow a little pressure into the oil tank to prime it.
 
Tree94

Tree94

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DSCN0595.JPG DSCN0601.JPG DSCN0603.JPG

After inspecting the oil pump a bit more. i noticed it looks like a piece of metal has broken off.
in the first pic, its the area the screwdriver is pointing to.
which has exposed the inside of the pump.
is this supposed to be exposed? or has my oil pump broken, and now its not air tight. thus causing the saw to not oil?
 
Philip Wheelock

Philip Wheelock

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Whew! That's ugly. New pump. Make sure you have that little o-ring that goes between the pump and the "elbow connector"; it might have been a casualty of the pump failure. Did you find any bits of metal around where the failure occurred?
 
Tree94

Tree94

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Ya, bought the saw from a pawn shop. Pretty dirty, but it runs strong!
And no, i did not happen to notice any broken metal pieces within the clutch area..

One of my local shops said they have a new one on hand for 40$
Probably buy that tomorrow and hope the problem gets solved

Thanks for the feedback/help.
Appreciate it
 
jr27236

jr27236

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Holy hell! Is there a pump under all that? I can just imagine what it looked like behind the clutch cover
 
Chainsaw Jim

Chainsaw Jim

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View attachment 486905 View attachment 486906 View attachment 486907

After inspecting the oil pump a bit more. i noticed it looks like a piece of metal has broken off.
in the first pic, its the area the screwdriver is pointing to.
which has exposed the inside of the pump.
is this supposed to be exposed? or has my oil pump broken, and now its not air tight. thus causing the saw to not oil?
That thing looks like a dirty ol logger used it fer a chaw.
 
Conquistador3

Conquistador3

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View attachment 486905 View attachment 486906 View attachment 486907

After inspecting the oil pump a bit more. i noticed it looks like a piece of metal has broken off.
in the first pic, its the area the screwdriver is pointing to.
which has exposed the inside of the pump.
is this supposed to be exposed? or has my oil pump broken, and now its not air tight. thus causing the saw to not oil?
That's exactly what happened to my 290 last weekend. And countless other saws. ;)
There's supposed to be a plug pressed in there and it came loose. All saws with that problem I've seen so far had at one point or another being run on spent engine oil in lieu of proper bar oil, but I think it's just a case of tear and wear/defective part.

Now, more experienced users will chime in but I think the 311/391 uses the same oil pump as older 1127 saws (029, MS310 etc). If that's the case you can save a lot of money by buying an aftermarket oil pump. The local Stihl dealership cut me a good deal but could not offer the spare at less than €65. An aftermarket kit on eBay (including pump, worm gear, oil lines etc) is €18 shipped to my door. Even if it lasts half as much as the OE pump, that's a no-brainer.
 
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