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How long before wood is seasons?

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by old blue xl 12, Nov 6, 2015.

  1. old blue xl 12

    old blue xl 12 ArboristSite Lurker

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    How long does it take for firewood to be seasoned does it depend on type of wood? Sorry new to the firewood game
     
  2. ChoppyChoppy

    ChoppyChoppy Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Depends on the wood, how wet it was when cut, split size, humidity in your area, sunlight, wind, etc.

    Generally speaking a year for most wood.
     
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  3. srb08

    srb08 Doesn't play well with others

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    A good rule of thumb is a year, although there are variables.
    I've had Red Oak that took two years to dry.
    The size of the splits and how they're stored also affect drying time. If the splits are covered (top only) and in a breezy area, with good air circulation, they'll dry faster than if left piled in the open.
    I've had some wood (tops of standing dead trees) that was ready to burn in four months.
     
  4. BoBDoG2o02

    BoBDoG2o02 ArboristSite Operative

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    I had some large hickory splits take 3 yrs.... the only way to know is with a moisture meter. $10 at harbor freight you should be shooting for 15-20%, your stove and chimney sweep will thank you.
     
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  5. svk

    svk A little bit of everything

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    As others said can vary widely. Let us know what you have.

    Standing dead trees with bark that has fallen off are often ready to burn.
     
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  6. Marc

    Marc Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Old people diapers.
     
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  7. olympyk_999

    olympyk_999 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    he's going to be here sooner or later so lets just get this over with.... ohh Whitespider
    upload_2015-11-6_9-2-37.jpeg
    [​IMG]:buttkick::dumb::laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing::laughing:
     
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  8. olympyk_999

    olympyk_999 Addicted to ArboristSite

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  9. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper Addicted to ArboristSite

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    As said depends on the wood and storage method.
    I have cut down maple trees and had then dry enough to burn in 7 days. I just stacked them right behind the wood burner and it is so dang dry with out the pot filled with water it sucks the moisture right out.

    :D Al
     
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  10. mn woodcutter

    mn woodcutter ArboristSite Guru

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    There's a plethora of information on this if you use the search tool. You will inevitably find the best way that works for you through trial and sometimes error. Good luck and happy reading!
     
  11. trukn2004

    trukn2004 ArboristSite Operative

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    I use a moisture meter to get and idea. a fresh split around 60 degrees will give you a decent idea.and also the clink test. Take two splits and rap them together. Should sound like bowling pins being hit by a ball. your best bet though is to plan at least a year split and stacked for your ash, maple, and other similar hardwoods when cut alive. Oaks and hickory and other very dense firewood cut green will probably take closer to two years split and stacked. The ultimate test I find is once you put the split in the stove and light it off. If you aren't getting a sizzle and water boiling out the end of the split, you did pretty darn good.
     
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  12. Fred Wright

    Fred Wright Addicted to ArboristSite

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    There are variables. Some tree species cure or season faster than others. How and where you stack split wood makes a difference, too. An important aspect is knowing what species of wood you have. When you know what it is, you can find easily how long it usually takes to dry.
     
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  13. zogger

    zogger Tree Freak

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    Around here in my stacks, one full summer for medium hard wood, dense wood like oak and hickory two full summers to get them dry. They will burn after one summer, but it isn't ideal. My stacks, the latter ones anyway, are on pallets with the pallets up on railroad ties. I leave them open through the summer, then try to nail the last hot and dry week in the fall and top cover before leaves start falling.
     
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  14. BoBDoG2o02

    BoBDoG2o02 ArboristSite Operative

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    I'm on the three year plan.... the wood i split this past spring(2015) will be burned starting in fall 2018. One year in the yard in a stacks 24' long x 4' high, i buck logs to 16". That pile moves from the stacks to my shed after a year. my shed holds two years supply, one year i feed from the north and refill that side, next year i feed from the south and refill that side. Three years is the way to be, it guarantees dry wood if it is covered and cared for.
     
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  15. Jere39

    Jere39 Outdoorsman and Pup

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    Depends -> google it.

    I feel like there ought to be a button added to the forum to just paste a canned answer to the same questions that come up weekly. But, ask away.

    I cut standing dead Red Oak, usually with more than half the bark already off, and the rest is eliminated during processing. These trees have typically been dead about 3-5 years, but were dying, mostly from Oak Wilt for several years before that. The interior edges of splits from the trunk typically read about 38-40% on a $8 moisture meter I have in my shed. Split, stacked in the open for sun and air to get to it, I can typically measure about 2% moisture reduction per month. Which suggests this dead Red will hit 20% in 10 months, and be ready for burning in a nice round 1 year. Of course humidity, wind, sun, are all variables, as are the size of my splits, the density of the wood, . . .

    Cut it, split it, stack it, wait as long as you can before you get too cold, then burn it.
     
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  16. old blue xl 12

    old blue xl 12 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Ok got to get moisture meter sounds like good investment
     
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  17. BoBDoG2o02

    BoBDoG2o02 ArboristSite Operative

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    Good stuff
     
  18. Whitespider

    Whitespider Lost in the 50s

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    What?? What?? Wha'd I miss??

    Oh... moisture meters.

    You don't need no stinkin' moisture meter... they lie anyway, no friggin' way they can work as claimed.
    Ya' haf'ta believe in magic if you're gonna' believe what a moisture meter tells ya'.

    Just stack your firewood out in the open sun for a few months... if it hisses and spits water when ya' toss it in the firebox, it needs more time in the sun.
    Won't be long and you'll know when it's dry enough just using your gut as a guide... like people have done for eons.
    ................................................................................................................................................
    I know y'all expected more than that from me... but I'm a touch out'a practice stirrin' the pot :D
    But just wait... winter ain't here yet :laughing:
    *
     
  19. BoBDoG2o02

    BoBDoG2o02 ArboristSite Operative

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    Wow, how about using a volt meter? Would my $500 Fluke lie to me? The principal is sound.....
     
  20. Whitespider

    Whitespider Lost in the 50s

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    Now we're getting down to the nitty-gritty :D
    Yeah... your Fluke would work measuring resistance (actually, you measure conductance). But each wood species is different, and the resistance ain't linear with moisture content... you'd need a reference chart. You'd also need to do temperature correction calculations. Here's a chart in mega-ohms, at 80°, with the probes 1.25 inches apart to give you an idea.
    Happy studying.

    chart.jpg
    *
     
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