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i was watching a wood stove viedo on you tube he was burning green doglas fir in his wood stove

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by gunny100, Apr 12, 2019.

  1. gunny100

    gunny100 ArboristSite Guru

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    I was watching a viedo on you tube a guy burns green doglas fur in his wood stove
    i was always told to burn only good hard woods thayt are very dry seasoned
    so you dont get a lot of cresote in the chiminey
    ust



    any body else burn green doglas fir
    i was told never to burn any pine in the wood stove
    only seasoned real dry hard woods
     
  2. MontanaTed

    MontanaTed Addict

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    I don’t advocate burning green line species but living in MT you don’t have too many hardwood options. Pine burns just fine. Doug Fir is sought after and dried burns well and hot.

    Living in hardwood country line gets the nose turn because there are better sources. But people have lived for years here burning the pine species.

    Regardless a chimney should be cleaned and inspected each year prior to burning season, and it be a rare occurrence to booger one up bad enough in a season.
     
  3. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo Addicted to ArboristSite

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    You can burn most any type/species of wood. Important thing is that it is seasoned and dry. Some areas don't have any choice but to burn pine or fir, etc. I lived in Wyoming for a number of yrs and burned ponderosa pine with no issues. It was seasoned and nice and dry.

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  4. bfrazier

    bfrazier ArboristSite Operative

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    Douglas Fir? Did someone say DOUGLAS FIR? Hell yes we burn Douglas Fir Gunny, but not green!
    My saw made cookies from these Douglas Fir sticks today. Trees with big limbs but short trunks are mostly for you Easterners, they're too damned afraid to grow out here Gunny, they'll never reach the sky! And wet and green are two different things too. You can find a big old stump of Douglas Fir and light and watch the fatwood burn in it while you skin and quarter your elk out right in the middle of a November rainstorm, maybe even cook some backstrap while you're at it.

    [​IMG]
    I didn't get a picture of the first 30 feet from this angle, but it was about a 36" dbh.
    There's maybe another 32 feet of top behind me in the bottom picture.
    [​IMG]
    There were two side by side.
     
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  5. Husky Man

    Husky Man Addicted to ArboristSite

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    BF, that right there is some FAHRWOOD;),

    Yep, in my neck of the Woods D Fir is KING, Just where in the HELL, did these STUPID Rumors about Burning Conifers, would get you a foundation full of Ashes come from?

    Dayum, the way some talk, you would think that it would be Much Safer throwing Gallon jugs of Napalm in your stove:confused::angry::dumb2:, Sure, I wish that I could ADD some Oak, and other Hardwoods to the wood shed, put I sure don't Complain about getting some Good D Fir, been heating Homes out West for a couple Hundred years, and any chimney fires were the fault of the person NOT Cleaning a Chimney, or burning green wood.

    I drive by 30-40" D Fir logs along the road and Wish that I could cut and Haul it away, but where I see most of that stuff, they won't LET me cut it:confused::(:(:(, I guess that it is much better to let it lay rotting in the forest, or worse, adding to the fuel load, in the forest:mad::mad:, let them BTU's heat MY home, Not Bambi, Thumper and Smokey Bear's home (Please Note, there is NO "The" in Smokey Bear's name;))


    Doug :cheers:
     
  6. Husky Man

    Husky Man Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Hey BF, just what are those thangs with wooden handles? I used to have a Peavey with a wooden handle, but those sure didn't look like no Peaveys to me, and kind of Brave, ain't ya using METAL Felling Wedges?;):surprised3::):)


    Doug :cheers:

    ps, them wooden handles and steel wedges, look like a Lot of Work to me, Hydraulics make life much easier:D
     
  7. bfrazier

    bfrazier ArboristSite Operative

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    Yo Doug! Did ya get that sturdy name after our state tree? Damn good trees, eh?

    There's a red top fallin wedge right in front of the saw in the top picture - I'd never risk my saw chain near a steel wedge. That's my hookaroon (pulp hook) laying on the cookie, what a wonderous tool they are. The maul is somewhere else at that point, but yeah, it's old school stuff.

    Fir splits so nice. I feel like a real brush ape when I bust 24 inch rounds with one blow, but the 30 or 36" wood down near the stump got these wedges for the first split, then I just peel off peices one hit at a time going around the piece. I actually just got the wedges, otherwise it's all maul for me.

    This sorta brings us back to the big wood discussion - if this were elm (or oak or madrone) I guess I'd own a splitter, but aside from really big rounds fir splits so easy it's not worth it.

    And I did loose a lot of trees - including some Madrones, Oaks, Ash, Maples, Cedars along with the Fir. And yeah, it's sickening to see them lay and rot. All I see is fuel fuel fuel.
     
  8. stumpy75

    stumpy75 ArboristSite Guru

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    Ouch. Looks like nice sawlogs to me! ;):)
     
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  9. bfrazier

    bfrazier ArboristSite Operative

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    Yeah Stumpy, three nice 32's and a top. But the conks say otherwise. :(
     
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  10. Cowboy254

    Cowboy254 ESD sufferer

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    I'm with you, gunny, there's no way that I would burn green dog fur in my wood stove.
     
  11. Oregonsaw

    Oregonsaw Fledgling Saw hoarder

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    Like just cut green or dried for 6-8 months green? There is a difference. You certainly don’t want to burn green or unseasoned much, but if that’s all you have... if you burn it hot once a day it chute down on the sote.
     
  12. alderman

    alderman Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I’ve never done it, but there was an older fella that told me in a pinch the heartwood out of a green Fir would burn fine.


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  13. Oregonsaw

    Oregonsaw Fledgling Saw hoarder

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    Heartwood is dead. It’s the sap wood that has all the moisture
     
  14. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Yes it is dead wood but it still has plenty of moisture in it. Thats all we burned in our camp stove was pine and we never had a problem with it. And I'm talking a cheap sheet metal wood stove to, not a heavy steel or cast stove.
    I clean my stove pipe every year and only have minimal build up. Many people burn pine because that's a;ll that is available.
     
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  15. Jethro 2t sniffer

    Jethro 2t sniffer Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Here in new Zealand we burn a lot of radiata pine and once there over 40 years the sap burns like petrol. 40 year's old there getting around 20 24 inches it grows very fast here 30 years is normal harvest age for logging. 60 80 100 year old stuff is awesome.

    Also burn a lot of macrocarpa (cypress) there everywhere over here as shelter belts.

    Here's a just shy of 6 foot macro I'm dealing to at the moment
    20190603_102215.jpg

    Messy trees if left alone for 120 years
    20190428_075944.jpg

    So yeah burn those conifers nothing wrong with them :)
     
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  16. 4seasons

    4seasons ArboristSite Guru

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    Every time I give my dog a hair cut I burn the hair in the stove. Nice smell and green flames. You should try it sometime!

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  17. 4seasons

    4seasons ArboristSite Guru

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    I thought the cedars around me got messy!

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  18. Jethro 2t sniffer

    Jethro 2t sniffer Addicted to ArboristSite

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    It makes it slow and tiring for ya wood but when it's free and available mite as well get into it
     
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