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Interested in becoming arborist, have a few questions about seasonal work.

Discussion in 'Employment Forum' started by Xander, Jan 2, 2019.

  1. Xander

    Xander New Member

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    I'm currently employed in the U.S. Airforce and am wanting to become a climbing arborist when I get out next year.

    I'm wondering if this type of work can be prominently a seasonal job, seeing as many major pruning cuts are done during the dormant months of winter. The plan is to work 3-6 months a year, figuring out where to settle down while gaining work experience. Is this a feasible plan for this job?

    I'm currently reading the ISA study guide and practicing my knots, any other advice on what else I can do to prepare myself is greatly appreciated, thank you.
     
  2. Murville Alleman

    Murville Alleman ArboristSite Lurker

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    Come to Atlanta Ga. and get professional climber training from Tree Climbers International; look us up at Treeclimbing.com
     
  3. Murville Alleman

    Murville Alleman ArboristSite Lurker

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  4. LoggerJimbo

    LoggerJimbo New Member

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    are you still progressing?
    do you want to run your own platform?
     
  5. Ketchup

    Ketchup Smells like 2-stroke.

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    @Xander
    There are many forestry and arboriculture jobs that can be done seasonally.
    First, you need to decide if you want to be a trimming and removal guy or a logger. Both are awesome.
    Then you need experience. It’s good that you’re reading and practicing skills, but experience is what makes a tree guy.

    Unfortunately whether you’re moving timber or pruning ornamental gardens, the job starts with some time doing grunt work. Many tree related businesses take advantage of entry level employees. Expect to be paid for hard work and be adamant about your personal safety. If it doesn’t happen, move on. Find a company that will give you enough responsibility to learn but not so much you get hurt.

    Finding a job that allows you seasonal absence is harder. Especially if you want to be gone 6 months or more. Typically a good employer wants to hold on to people who are smart and work hard. But there are many jobs that dry up for part of the year, so getting invited back can be as much of a trick as getting time off. Many people also bounce from one job and location to another until they have more experience and find the right spot. There are tree guys most places in the US, though certain areas are better paying or more hazardous.

    Basically, find good people, work your butt off, and you’ll love it!

    Stay safe.
     

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