ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


Introducing Brand New Wood Furnace to Market - The Drolet Tundra!

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by Fyrebug, Mar 19, 2013.

  1. djkost

    djkost ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2011
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    mn
    I was told itmcost 2600 US. I'm going to order one also,
     
  2. 82mkiiltype

    82mkiiltype ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2013
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Kingston, Ontario, Canada
    Well, the new Heatpro is in my basement. Ummm, it's big. I'll try to take a few pics over the next day or two. Any specific areas of interest?
     
  3. 3fordasho

    3fordasho ArboristSite Guru

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2007
    Messages:
    540
    Likes Received:
    134
    Location:
    Southern Minnesota
    Firebox around the door, from the inside. Curious how they addressed the cracking issue that occurred on the Heatmax/Tundra.
     
  4. 82mkiiltype

    82mkiiltype ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2013
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Kingston, Ontario, Canada
  5. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu Hey you woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,456
    Likes Received:
    1,866
    Location:
    NE/Central Ohio
    It seems that some of the older Tundra/Heatmaxes have larger intake holes than the later ones and SBI will send a "restrictor plate" to clip on the intake to throttle 'er down. (it comes with the brick update kit that they are sending out right now) Since my furnace is a "rescue" I won't be getting a kit and need to make my own parts. I was just thinking this past weekend that the intake seems like it could be throttled a bit for a less dramatic "on/off" action of the fire when the damper opens, so I agree with SBIs move here.
    So I went downstairs to make my plate and after removing the damper door, I realized this is gonna be really simple. No sense in making this more difficult than it needs to be (like I did with my SS firebox shields a couple pages back ;))
    The factory intake holes are already 1" tall and the center hole is already 2.5" x 1" so only hafta restrict the side holes. I just used some high temp aluminum duct tape...:)
    DSCN1220.JPG
    Mr @3fordasho had a great idea for a temp controller that I decided to copy. Here are pics of the temp controller that I finally put on last weekend. I used a extra deep steel 4x4 electrical box with a extra thick single wall outlet cover to mount the controller in. There was just enough room for the controller and a mini relay in there too. The 4x4 box is just screwed down to the factory controls box on the back of the furnace.
    The controller monitors flue temp via a thermocouple inserted into the stove pipe. When the thermostat calls for heat, the controller will close the damper once the flue temp reaches the high temp limit that I have chosen, even if the tstat is still calling for heat. The controller will keep the damper shut until the flue temp drops to a second low temp of my choosing, at that point, it will allow the damper to reopen if the tstat is still not satisfied, then the cycle starts all over. Kinda keeps the furnace operating right in it's "sweet spot" even if the tstat is never satisfied (like REALLY cold out or your house is really too big for the furnace to keep up with)
    Additionally, the controller will open the damper if the temp drops too low, say for burning off the building pile of coals that can sometimes happen in the coldest parts of the winter or if you have a "too wet" load of wood that just doesn't want to burn good after the damper closes (like right after a reload)(ever hafta leave for work in the morning before the stove was really hot enough for "cruise" mode? :rolleyes:)
    DSCN1223.JPG The furnace is cold in this pic so that is the basement temp showing in red.
    Sorry about the blurriness of this one, camera refused to focus on this subject! Shot from above/behind
    DSCN1225.JPG
     
  6. flotek

    flotek Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2008
    Messages:
    1,676
    Likes Received:
    1,127
    Location:
    pa
    Slicker than snot on a door knob
     
    brenndatomu likes this.
  7. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu Hey you woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,456
    Likes Received:
    1,866
    Location:
    NE/Central Ohio
    Wow, just tried that out...it really is pretty slick...just FYI :confused: ;) :laughing:
     
  8. Digger79

    Digger79 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North of Indy
    I was getting short 2ndary burn times out of my tundra. I increased the stack by 2 more sections and like magic the burn times got longer during secondary which I feel is really tertiary burn. I have literally built one of these re burning furnaces out of a barrel stove out of interest in the technology so I have learned it fairly well.

    I can tell you this with the Tundra. Wood must be good and dry, well seasoned and the draft is important.

    This furnace requires a stronger draft than conventional stoves so when it dampers down for the tertiary burn it pulls hard enough to keep the stove hotter longer thus equaling a longer tertiary burn. The baro damper is prob a good idea as you want to have the strongest draft possible when needed but not during initial firing when flu gets hottest. Its tough to increase the draw when the dampers closed with out over firing the furnace with too strong of a draft.. soo create a stack that has too strong of a draft and dial it down to a safe operating level or steady/ideal with the baro. Set the baro so its staying closed and only opening a little when the stack is at its hottest. This a way you can set the draft really high for the tertiary burn so it pulls hard pulling plenty of air thru those little pin holes. This will keep the stove at the required temp for the tertiary burn to work longer than with a weak draft or draw. Trying to nail the exact proper height is tough to impossible especially with varying wind conditions as well flue temps and fire increasing and decreasing. So over build dial down with baro damper. This has been my experience over a few years of operating the tundra. Other factors less important than strong draft and dry wood are ; fresh oxygen(rarely and issue), smaller splits stack up or loose larger splits(tightly packed loads can coal up and cool down too much giving a longer fire but less heat and less re burning so less fuel from more wood with this stove). The flu on these stoves rarely gets up to 400 degrees and only at those temps or hotter should the baro be opening slightly from the strong draw.. main damper should be open during this point. Average flu temps I get are 200-300. The type of wood is helpful too. Stove will function with woods like ash but harder woods like oak and hickory really kick this stove up to its potential.

    The idea with this stove is hot fires. You will find with hotter fires more consistently you will use much less wood than you ever did by smoldering wood in the old stoves.

    Good luck and enjoy. The above is possibly worth what you just paid for it I am no physics major but starting with smaller stack, adding as I went along and experimenting with multiple types of loads and wood I have managed to increase my burn times to the claims or longer and improve efficiency, really dialing this stove in and its quite nice and efficient. No problems like anyone else has described yet and had some damn hot fires temps around 500.(temps measured with a surface magnetic cheapo stove therm placed right next to top left corner of door on main body of stove.) I run another therm on the face of the clean out for the upper chamber. I wouldn't push this stove any hotter its not your old cast iron stove. Burning above the 500-550 mark may warp things I dunno. 500 is max I've gone and its damned hot and plenty good there. Kinda reminds me of reviews I read about a 30 ton splitter guys where tearing up on logs larger than 3ft in diameter.. umm well really if your splitting 3ft and bigger diameter logs a 30 ton splitter may be a touch to light. Ive been killin it with 2' diameter logs and a few larger but big as I care to handle it smoke them with ease. things to consider there.
     
  9. aokpops

    aokpops Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Messages:
    2,607
    Likes Received:
    1,005
    Location:
    ohio
    I look threw the post an never seen this mention , been running 60 our over humidity no water pot any more ,not a bad thing . With hardly any wood brunt with the tundra I know the weather is very mild , but well under 50 percent of what is normal . Could not see were all the cracking problems were ,but with a fire this robust I can understand why .
     
  10. Digger79

    Digger79 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North of Indy
    I reduced the air intake by bending the connection bar to the hook driven by motor just sightly. two things happens.. the tab coming off the damper door fits the hook better now so it doesn't slope around, it fits right in the bend and stays snug now. As well the damper doesn't open quite as far so it has reduced the oxygen intake tad similar to smaller holes. in other words instead of a plate you can just bend the damper to open to your liking and it will slow the speed which air molecules can squeeze thru the opening. Smaller the crack the less can fit through per second.
     
  11. BrantSFGDS

    BrantSFGDS ArboristSite Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2014
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    54
    I finally installed Tundra and got to use it for half a season. I love it! I checked with Drolet to make sure mine had the improvements and I haven't had any problems. It burns 12 hours without any hassle and I haven't had any problems with the 8" chimney.
     
    aokpops and zogger like this.
  12. aokpops

    aokpops Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Messages:
    2,607
    Likes Received:
    1,005
    Location:
    ohio
    Should have bought a drolet years ago would have saved a lot of work
     
  13. Jules083

    Jules083 ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    121
    Location:
    Richmond, Ohio
    Mine just started cracking, I bought it in January 2015. Any words of advice? They still standing behind this thing? I’d love to just have a refund or credit to get the new bigger one, this thing is just slightly undersized on the real cold days for my house.

    Calling Drolet after work.
     
  14. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu Hey you woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,456
    Likes Received:
    1,866
    Location:
    NE/Central Ohio
    I haven't heard of them hanging anybody out to dry...yours still have the lifetime firebox warranty? They changed that on the last couple of years of the T1...
     
  15. Jules083

    Jules083 ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    121
    Location:
    Richmond, Ohio
    That’s a good question, I have no idea. I emailed them all the pictures they asked for, waiting to hear back from them now.

    Thanks.
     
  16. aokpops

    aokpops Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Messages:
    2,607
    Likes Received:
    1,005
    Location:
    ohio
    Were was the cracking at ? Any photos ? Had one a few years now small crack at the corner of the door . Every stove I seen done this
     
  17. Jules083

    Jules083 ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    121
    Location:
    Richmond, Ohio
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]
     
  18. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Messages:
    1,990
    Likes Received:
    2,065
    Location:
    Michigan
    I removed a over 30 year old Southerern Aire add on Wood furnace because it had a crack in it. One crack about 5 inches long and maybe a 1/16 inch wide right at the top of the fire box. Like I said it was over 30 years old it was in the house when we bought it and I hove no Idea how long the PO's had it.

    :D Al
     
  19. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu Hey you woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,456
    Likes Received:
    1,866
    Location:
    NE/Central Ohio
    Pretty classic cracks on the Tundra 1...maybe a bit longer than some...
     
  20. Jules083

    Jules083 ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2011
    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    121
    Location:
    Richmond, Ohio
    I’m guessing they’ve been growing for a while and I’ve just not noticed them. I got a questionnaire emailed to me, need to fill it out and email it back. Hopefully they warranty this thing.

    Either way, I’m a welder by trade and have a full shop at home. So if they don’t warranty it I’ll fix this one, and if they do warranty it and don’t want this one back I’ll probably still fix it. It’ll look good heating the garage.
     

Share This Page