ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


Is it safe to burn kiln dried hardwood from cabinet shop?

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by Sharp3, Feb 14, 2012.

  1. Sharp3

    Sharp3 ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Decatur IN
    I can get as much as I want in various sizes oak and maple mostly. Clean no glue or finish on the pieces. Can the wood damage my 25ft ss liner or my voglezang wood furnace? I know I cant obvously pack the furnace full because it burns so hot......
     
  2. time warp

    time warp ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Messages:
    150
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    ohio
    I don't see any problems. If it burns too hot mix it with other wood. Free wood is the best wood. WELCOME to arborist site
     
  3. J1m

    J1m ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2011
    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    122
    Location:
    Maine
    I'm not familiar with your furnace - but unless there are harmful chemicals or other unknowns about this wood - I see the fact that it was kiln dried at a cabinet shop just about irrelevant.

    It's free! Burn more, worry less!
     
  4. TonyK

    TonyK Addicted to ArboristSite Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Messages:
    1,217
    Likes Received:
    1,340
    Location:
    VT
    Not a problem burning clean cutoffs. My neighbor does wood floors and once gave me a pickup truck full of t&g cherry cutoffs from a big job he was doing. As others have mentioned just go easy on them they will burn really hot. Welcome to the site!
     
  5. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2009
    Messages:
    2,106
    Likes Received:
    271
    Location:
    Palisade,Mn
    I have perused the manual and it did not mention kiln dried wood..it talked about burning seasoned wood or coal and to maintain a draft speed of .05" of w.c. or slower.

    It is my belief that you will over fire the furnace and hurt it.
    http://content.vogelzang.com/Inst/15002500.pdf

    You should contact them directly with a question of what is propper use.
    Vogelzang International
    400 West 17th Street • Holland, MI 49423
    Phone: (616) 396-1911 • Fax (616) 396-1971
    [email protected]
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2012
  6. Sharp3

    Sharp3 ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Decatur IN
    Ok thanks crapie man. Will the kiln dried wood creosote more than regular logs I just wanted to toss few pieces of wood in every now and then.
     
  7. Iska3

    Iska3 Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    Messages:
    1,520
    Likes Received:
    691
    Location:
    Minnesota
    We have a factory not far from here where they had clean kiln dry scraps of Oak and Maple. I burned it in my inside cast wood furnace for many years until I over loaded it and cracked the casting. Keep in mind that most of that wood is around 10% so it burns real hot. We would bring it home by the pick up loads and put it in shopping bags.

    People around here still burn it but like the other postings wrote, keep an eye on it. It don't take much to make a red hot stove. Start out with small amounts and work your way up to what you think is ok. Keep in mind that it burns from all ends and each piece at the same time so it gets hot fast.

    Real clean burning wood but burns real hot...... You'll like it..
     
  8. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2009
    Messages:
    2,106
    Likes Received:
    271
    Location:
    Palisade,Mn
    Creosote really comes from the bark of wood. The wood you'd be getting I'd assume is bark free. The issue is with the lack of moisture it could be an over heating situation. A run away fire is easy if you have certain conditions.At the very least you could warp and split a firebox.

    The manual calls for not more than .05" of wc for the BDR...you do have that right? It said it did not come with one but that it was need for the operation...funny. I know as apart of the UL listing we have a BDR is apart of the build list and it is a standard component. Anyway at .05" you could get fires hot enough to hurt the firebox walls with kiln dried wood. You said a piece or two...well it could be real easy for someone to throw a few more pieces in...walla...big fire...hot fire...warped firebox....it happens...life happens...no stoppin it.


    At 1st I was like what the f 'n A, but I'm workin on a kinder gentler more forgiving attitude...do what you want...knowing what I know I'd steer clear....but do what ya like.
    Call the maker..I did post their contact info for you to use ya know.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2012
  9. laynes69

    laynes69 Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    1,701
    Likes Received:
    296
    Location:
    Ohio
    Creosote comes from moisture, low flue temps, or incomplete combustion. We have a local company that is advertising lumber cut-offs. Its cut offs from 4x4 lumber in various lengths. If burned in a fashion that allows for little air space around the load it would be okay. It's when 1X scraps and such are thrown in a loose pile they will burn very hot. Most manufacturers recommend not to burn lumber scraps, but depending on what's burned may be alright. Slabwood can do the same thing, it's just using common sense. If you do burn cut offs, mix with cordwood. It will allow you to stretch out your wood.
     
  10. Sharp3

    Sharp3 ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Decatur IN
    What does " .05" of wc for the BDR" mean?
     
  11. Iska3

    Iska3 Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    Messages:
    1,520
    Likes Received:
    691
    Location:
    Minnesota
    +1
     
  12. blackdogon57

    blackdogon57 Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    1,155
    Likes Received:
    248
    Location:
    North of 45
    Great post. If you think the wood is too dry you can always store it outside. If it is really " too dry" it will pick up moisture if left to the elements.
    I personally don't believe a piece of wood can be too dry.
     
  13. Soby1

    Soby1 ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2006
    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    Hayfield M.N.
    I get trash cans full of scrap from the local cabinat shop. I use it for kindling works great.
     
  14. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2009
    Messages:
    2,106
    Likes Received:
    271
    Location:
    Palisade,Mn
    .05" is a measurement done with a manometer..it measures water column which is how draft speeds are measured like the speed in a car is mph. Point zero five inches is also a negative number....as we are reading suction or the flues ability to draw up and out the by products of wood combustion.
    BDR stands for barometric draft regulator. It has a canter-levered rail with a weight on it. The weight is moved on this rail to get it's flap to ride more open or less open resulting in lessening the draft or strengthening it.

    Depending on the construction of the flue with the insulation in place and the size of the flue in diameter and the length of the flue...or longer flues which can have stronger draft speeds or even elevations will effect flues in their ability to draft. Some are too strong and require BDR's...some are too weak and need draft inducers.
    Not all wood burning appliances are designed to run at the same draft speeds.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2012
  15. Sharp3

    Sharp3 ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Decatur IN
    I have a 6'' 25 ft ss liner in my chimney thats insulated with ceramic blanket. No trees near to obstruct the draft. Can I measure the draft with the manometer or do I have to hire a person to do it? I am going to call voglezang when I get off work thanks for the info guys.
     
  16. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2009
    Messages:
    2,106
    Likes Received:
    271
    Location:
    Palisade,Mn
    You can buy an inexpensive manometer and do your own testing.
    We offer a Dwyers Mark II for like $58.There may even be cheaper ones online.
    Doing the test and making adjustments is pretty simple.
     
  17. GAJON

    GAJON ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2010
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Rome, GA
    There is no problem what so ever with burning that wood. Don't fill your box full of it, just mix it or split it for kindling. I get the similar red oak, poplar, white oak from my bro in laws foundry. Some of the cleanest burning wood I have ever seen. Works really well in smokers to for the heat. Burn it!
     
  18. Sharp3

    Sharp3 ArboristSite Lurker

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Decatur IN
    sounds like a bdr is in my future.
     
  19. mallardman

    mallardman ArboristSite Operative

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2012
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    199
    Location:
    SW PA
    I used to work in a wood moulding warehouse and would take all the 1' bundles of moulding I could get. Or was of various species, red oak, pine, poplar. Had a cord of it stored in the garage at one point. I only used it for kindling though which it was wonderful for.
     
  20. zogger

    zogger Tree Freak

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2010
    Messages:
    16,456
    Likes Received:
    11,125
    Location:
    North Georgia
    I worked for some years in wood shops, furniture, cabinets, disposable stamped products. As such, I had readily available cheap or free scrap, all manner of hardwoods. Heck, I even got birdseye maple once, a whole truckload of scraps for three bucks.... (wish I could get that now, ha)

    That stuff is great! It's the hottest burning driest wood you will ever see. That stuff burns hot as a nukoleer reaction! Or close to it anyway. You don't need much for a hot fire, but it doesn't last long. The one time I ever had a chimney catch, I was burning that stuff (added too much onto some coals), so WATCH OUT. Start with a few pieces, check it out, soon you'll see what you can load and not go over the top with it (too many variables on size of piece, etc, you'll have to do that)

    Great in small quantities. If you are just sitting around, just get up every 20 minutes or so and chunk some pieces on, whoosh..instaheat.

    Actually,the better stuff is if you can get it from a scrap mountain outside the shop where it has hung out in the weather and rain and grayed out a little. Then it burns a little more reasonably like normal well seasoned firewood.
     

Share This Page