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It was a hell of a ride...

ropensaddle

ropensaddle

Feel Lucky
Joined
Feb 11, 2007
Messages
22,259
Location
Hot Springs Arkansas
All of us old orthopedic wrecks'll need push button up n down, push button start n stop trimsaws, inline oxygen feeds, the works!

There's more satisfaction doing fine class one pruning of huge trees, than being their grim reaper however respectfully.

I know a few 70 plus climbers myself, but they're only good for a half day climbin.

I'm not any good for much more than half a day myself lately!

Don't tell me that hospital didn't hook you up on some kinda morphine during your stay Rope!

You ain't that tough!

jomoco
Well yes at hospital I had stuff but after out they gave prescription i never filled as I can't stand codeine rather hurt than be sick!
 
ropensaddle

ropensaddle

Feel Lucky
Joined
Feb 11, 2007
Messages
22,259
Location
Hot Springs Arkansas
Good to hear it. We just settled my case last week, but my climbing days are over, I'm afraid. Shoulder has good days and bad days, but it could have been way worse.
I hear you on good and bad days I had them since but my only choice was to get back on rope so i did! If you ever get up this way holler I'll give you a wraptor ride :cheers:
 
murphy4trees

murphy4trees

Addicted to ArboristSite
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Apr 20, 2002
Messages
2,479
Location
suburban Philadelphia, Pa
I thought you broke it while rigging it. Its even worse with the new information!
Ya that just sounds like one of those 1 in 10,000 that there is just no way to predict .... its a matter of pdds... knowing species that are inclined to such weaknesses helps too.. around here its dead ash... even if the top liooks good the base can give out.. Buddy of mine went up a lrge dead ash... made the first cut and the whole tree fell out from under him... fortunatelty he was tied to a nearby tree.
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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Nov 2, 2009
Messages
8,685
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MD
Wow, I can't believe it's been 2 years. I'm glad you are still with us, and still hanging out on AS.My Dad took a bad fall when he was 60, about 30'. He was the most safety oriented person I ever met. Yet, he broke one of his own cardinal rules. Never use some one else's equipment. Our shop was about 35-40 miles out in the country from most of our work. Our top climber lived "down county", so we let him meet us on site. One day he didn't show. Dad swung by to check on us, he was running estimates in his Cadillac, so none of his gear. He got our climbers gear and started elevating the roof line of a two story house. In a blink he was on the ground. Broke his left shoulder, hip, and ankle. He landed on his Super EZ, cracking several vertebrae. When we inspected our climbers rope we found several spots where the inner core had been pinched off. Most of our work was in high end neighborhoods, where we seldom dropped big logs across lawns. We would chunk the stem down in firewood size blocks making one dent in the ground that could be filled with a wheel barrow of soil. Our climber had the bad habit of dropping chunks on his rope. We figured he had dropped chunks and the sharp edge of the chunk had pinched the rope on roots or rocks. That was in the early days of braided rope. Dad recovered and continued to climb some into his 70's. He passed in 2004 from prostate cancer at 81. I just turned 60. I haven't been in a tree since I got my knee replaced last November, and it really surprised me, I don't miss it. I still play with my mill and my guns. I just bought a Savage 1919 NRA Match rifle. The second 5 shot group, at 25 yards, was a single hole about 3/8 of an inch. There is life after tree work. If you have to let it go, let it go. God bless, Joe.
 
hseII

hseII

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Dec 20, 2013
Messages
4,922
Location
Georgia
Wow, I can't believe it's been 2 years. I'm glad you are still with us, and still hanging out on AS.My Dad took a bad fall when he was 60, about 30'. He was the most safety oriented person I ever met. Yet, he broke one of his own cardinal rules. Never use some one else's equipment. Our shop was about 35-40 miles out in the country from most of our work. Our top climber lived "down county", so we let him meet us on site. One day he didn't show. Dad swung by to check on us, he was running estimates in his Cadillac, so none of his gear. He got our climbers gear and started elevating the roof line of a two story house. In a blink he was on the ground. Broke his left shoulder, hip, and ankle. He landed on his Super EZ, cracking several vertebrae. When we inspected our climbers rope we found several spots where the inner core had been pinched off. Most of our work was in high end neighborhoods, where we seldom dropped big logs across lawns. We would chunk the stem down in firewood size blocks making one dent in the ground that could be filled with a wheel barrow of soil. Our climber had the bad habit of dropping chunks on his rope. We figured he had dropped chunks and the sharp edge of the chunk had pinched the rope on roots or rocks. That was in the early days of braided rope. Dad recovered and continued to climb some into his 70's. He passed in 2004 from prostate cancer at 81. I just turned 60. I haven't been in a tree since I got my knee replaced last November, and it really surprised me, I don't miss it. I still play with my mill and my guns. I just bought a Savage 1919 NRA Match rifle. The second 5 shot group, at 25 yards, was a single hole about 3/8 of an inch. There is life after tree work. If you have to let it go, let it go. God bless, Joe.

Great Post.
 
Pete6

Pete6

New Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2005
Messages
4
Location
Tasmania, Australia
Did you rigging the top mean you intended to catch and lower it, but it failed prior to any rigging forces coming into play?

So even if you'd said the heck with any rigging, and free felled the upper 15 foot head, the tree would've broke at the base anyway?

You're shakin my faith in mother nature's ability to weed out the weak and flawed trees with wind n rain.

I like nice violent storms. Makes my job safer. I often look up at iffy leaners thinkin, heck, if it stayed up in that last blow? This'll be cake!

jomoco
"
"I like nice violent storms. Makes my job safer. I often look up at iffy leaners thinkin, heck, if it stayed up in that last blow? This'll be cake!"

I think this is a false and potentially dangerous notion of security. When storms take a tree, trees or just sections of a tree out they can expose other trees or limbs to wind-loading they have never been exposed to before. Trees often , not invariably, put on strength in relation to the loads they experience. For example: think of a square forest losing trees on the edge which have sheltered to next row for years on end.
 
beardface

beardface

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Feb 23, 2021
Messages
39
Location
uk somerset
You know what sucks, is anytime soomething goes wrong, I always go back and figure out what I could have done differently. This was just a case of the wrong damn tree. It's kind of haunting me, because I wouldn't hve done anything differently with the information I had.
Nothing mate - I’ve never ever trusted aspen or any poplars they are the worst for misbehaving and simply too brittle to trust, hinges pop well before or simply never hold and yeah, I hate them . I rarely snatch and dislike lowering even if it’s off a different stem to my anchor. I’m glad you are ok but you ain’t alone dude , don’t sweat it , of all the aspens/poplars I’ve had to dismantle 70% have been real nightmares with a few memorable specimens nearly taking me with them or leaving me feeling like that’s the last one I do...
best wishes and speedy recovery.
 
TheJollyLogger

TheJollyLogger

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Apr 27, 2009
Messages
2,710
Location
Georgetown TX, Fairbanks AK
Nothing mate - I’ve never ever trusted aspen or any poplars they are the worst for misbehaving and simply too brittle to trust, hinges pop well before or simply never hold and yeah, I hate them . I rarely snatch and dislike lowering even if it’s off a different stem to my anchor. I’m glad you are ok but you ain’t alone dude , don’t sweat it , of all the aspens/poplars I’ve had to dismantle 70% have been real nightmares with a few memorable specimens nearly taking me with them or leaving me feeling like that’s the last one I do...
best wishes and speedy recovery.
Well, you climb 10,000 trees and 99% doesn't sound so good, lol. I think of that day a lot, and there are many things I could have done differently, but water under the bridge...
 
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