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Lawn tree

Fred Bernal

Fred Bernal

New Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2001
Messages
2
I'Ve been looking around for a type of tree that is fast growing that I can plant on my front yard lawn. The area is approx. 30'x 30'and slopes toward the street. Last week end I saw a tree I really liked at the golf course. I was told it is a "silver leaf poplar". I would appreciate any feed back on the pros & cons regarding this tree.
Thans, Fred
 
Darin

Darin

The Big Kahuna
Staff member
Joined
Mar 29, 2001
Messages
4,782
Location
Littleton, Colorado, United States
Fred,
Poplars are rapid-growing but relatively short-lived trees. The leaves tremble in the slightest breeze because of their laterally compressed petioles. Male and female flowers grow on separate trees and bloom in drooping catkins long before the leaves emerge. The fruits, which mature before the leaves are fully grown, are small, thick-walled capsules that contain many minute seeds clothed in cottony tufts of silky hairs, which assist in wind dispersal. The wood of poplars is relatively soft and hence is mostly used to make cardboard boxes, crates, paper, and veneer. The silver leaf poplar is also known as a white poplar. Hope this helps,
Darin
 
UrbanEarth

UrbanEarth

ArboristSite Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2001
Messages
61
Location
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Poplars grow to be VERY large, and are usually not suited to be in a residential environment. 30X30 is way too small an area (IMHO) to even think about a poplar tree. Their roots are also very invasive.
To put things in perspective, the next time that you are at the golf course that you asw the tree at, measure off (quickly of course, other people are playing!) 30X30 and see how much space is left.

Alan
 
Deere John

Deere John

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Feb 2, 2001
Messages
368
Location
Northern Ontario, Canada
I've never recommended poplar. The one your are considering is a short-lived tree (50-60 years before it starts to break-up)(Populus alba is the latin name). More concerning is that there are many diseases of poplar, and the more off-site the growing location is to what is the ideal spot for a poplar, the more prone they will be to disease. That makes for an ugly, unsafe tree.

I usually recommend white birch (and its weeping cousin), red oak or larch. The two hardwoods are reasonably fast growing, have a good form but do not dominate a site like red or silver maple. Secondly, it is still possible to grow grass beneath them, as they are not that thick. Larch comes in two or three types, and is suitable for moist to fresh areas. It loves to be by itself, and will grow fast once it is established. It is a deciduous needle-bearing tree, so you will have seasonality with it. Again, it is not too thick that your 30x30 area will be mud underneath the tree.

I recommend that you rethink the poplar. There are better choices available.
 
Rick C

Rick C

New Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2001
Messages
1
Fred,

My wife and I live in a congested area in Chicago. About 15 years ago we were looking for a fast growing tree to give us more privacy from the neighbors. We settled on a Lombardi poplar hybred.
We planted two poplars along the lot line of our 25' by 25' back yard. It was incredable just how quickly the trees grew. We have two majestic 60' tall trees that have given us absolutely no trouble.
We chose a hybred because they live a lot longer. They require no maintenance and really don't deposit much mess or leaves in the yard. We have had no problem with roots. If we can have two poplars in our postage stamp size back yard, I don't see why you couldn't plant one.
They do get awfully tall though!

Rick
 
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