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Leveraxe

Woodjack

Woodjack

ArboristSite Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2007
Messages
62
Location
Catskill Mountains, NY
Leveaxe lives on.

Leveraxe is en route to it's new home. Jensent will be in possession as the next axe tester.

Thank you Mr. Finland for letting me the try your Leveaxe.
It's a s great axe. I enjoyed using it.

However, as has been said over and over again, it's much too expensive. You claim it's because Finland has a lot of social services. How wonderful - but I don't think anyone here wants to pay for it.

I tried making leveraxe my axe of choice - first out of the woodshed. Bottom line is I still prefer my Fiskars that's about one sixth the price. If the Leveraxe was much much much much cheaper, it may give Fiskars a run for it's money.:greenchainsaw:
 
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Finland

Finland

ArboristSite Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2007
Messages
96
Location
In Finland
Leveraxe is en route to it's new home. Jensent will be in possession as the next axe tester.

Thank you Mr. Finland for letting me the try your Leveaxe.
It's a s great axe. I enjoyed using it.

However, as has been said over and over again, it's much too expensive. You claim it's because Finland has a lot of social services. How wonderful - but I don't think anyone here wants to pay for it.

I tried making leveraxe my axe of choice - first out of the woodshed. Bottom line is I still prefer my Fiskars that's about one sixth the price. If the Leveraxe was much much much much cheaper, it may give Fiskars a run for it's money.:greenchainsaw:
Thank you for your honest opinion. I fully agree with you that it can be expensive for some people and for some communities. It is the question about where you live. The value of the money is different in each country. The price of the Leveraxe is very tolerable in Finland. If we are looking to Japan, the price there is 49800 JPY, this equals 583.48 USD. Check http://easyconverter.net/currency/ http://vipukirves.net/default.aspx
These are such things to which, so far, I cannot effect.
Anyway, next step, some day I hope to be possible to manufacture the Leveraxes in US. by your own laibor and by your own living costs. Then, I hope, the price will be lowered possible for everyone. So far I will continue negotiations and do my best to reach the point good for us all.
I get a lot of excellent feed back from my American and Canadian customers.
All the best
Regards
Heikki, the inventor:cheers:
 

RDA1

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Sep 11, 2010
Messages
11
Location
Ohio
I am interested in trying this axe. I haven't read the complete thread, only the first 7-8 pages. Or, if someone is going to have it in Ohio soon, maybe I can coordinate a time to meet up.

If it is still going around, please let me know. Shipping is a non-issue, I ship stuff via FedEx Ground every week.

Regards,

Rich
 
Finland

Finland

ArboristSite Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2007
Messages
96
Location
In Finland
I am interested in trying this axe. I haven't read the complete thread, only the first 7-8 pages. Or, if someone is going to have it in Ohio soon, maybe I can coordinate a time to meet up.

If it is still going around, please let me know. Shipping is a non-issue, I ship stuff via FedEx Ground every week.

Regards,

Rich
I suppose that the last one who got the Leveraxe for testing purposes, has got time enough. Now it is time to send it to the next tester. Mean while you'll find the next one, read this.KIRVES: Heikki Vipukirves
Best regards
Heikki :cheers:
 
ericjeeper

ericjeeper

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Oct 23, 2006
Messages
3,080
Age
54
Location
Indiana USA
I am interested in trying this axe. I haven't read the complete thread, only the first 7-8 pages. Or, if someone is going to have it in Ohio soon, maybe I can coordinate a time to meet up.

If it is still going around, please let me know. Shipping is a non-issue, I ship stuff via FedEx Ground every week.

Regards,

Rich
I think there has been a minimum requirement set as to post and length of membership to receive the axe.. It has went AWOL a few times over the past few years. We are trying diligently to not lose Finlands axe.It is nothing personal against you...
 
ericjeeper

ericjeeper

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Oct 23, 2006
Messages
3,080
Age
54
Location
Indiana USA
Question to Finland

here in USA our minimum wage that a lot of workers work for is around 8 US dollars per hour. So one basically has to work a full 40 hours in order to be able to purchase this fine tool. How many hours does the average Finlander have to work to buy it in your country?
 
Finland

Finland

ArboristSite Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2007
Messages
96
Location
In Finland
here in USA our minimum wage that a lot of workers work for is around 8 US dollars per hour. So one basically has to work a full 40 hours in order to be able to purchase this fine tool. How many hours does the average Finlander have to work to buy it in your country?
Difficult to say the precise number of hours, but based to the average net salary the answer is 10-15 hours.
Can be more, can be less.
 
zogger

zogger

Tree Freak
Joined
Nov 23, 2010
Messages
16,456
Location
North Georgia

I don't split like that how you are doing it with the fiskars and hultafors. I start at the outside and go around the log until I get to the heartwood, then split that in half or quarters. It is MUCH more efficient that way and less getting the axe stuck and more clean splits with every strike.

You start with a round, go around the outside, take off small chunks. Some of those can get resplit in half as well. The bark on trees acts like a band that holds the wood together more, the faster you get the band off, the easier it gets to split.

Now on the inside still remaining to be split part of the log round, you have anything from a square to an octagon to a ..whatever, a 16-agon. We get some whopper big rounds here sometimes, so going around from the outside results in varying geometric shapes once the bark wood chunks are split off..

NOW you can grid it out, splitting nice neat splits, again, starting from the outside and work your way in.

Why you do this, working from the outside in on larger logs/rounds is less stuck together surface area, meaning less effort to get the wood unstuck or "split".

Whacking right down the middle in medium to large rounds is the old fashioned heavy clunky dull maul method, using brute force over proper technique. I only split down the middle if the round only needs splitting in half or quarters, anything larger than that, I go round and round first.

I like your videos though and that lever axe. I can afford the fiskars and got one of those. Leveraxe is like weeks of pay for me...so that isn't happening...but it *is* really neat looking and looks like it could work well in a lot of situations.
 
Finland

Finland

ArboristSite Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2007
Messages
96
Location
In Finland
Video

I don't split like that how you are doing it with the fiskars and hultafors. I start at the outside and go around the log until I get to the heartwood, then split that in half or quarters. It is MUCH more efficient that way and less getting the axe stuck and more clean splits with every strike.

You start with a round, go around the outside, take off small chunks. Some of those can get resplit in half as well. The bark on trees acts like a band that holds the wood together more, the faster you get the band off, the easier it gets to split.

Now on the inside still remaining to be split part of the log round, you have anything from a square to an octagon to a ..whatever, a 16-agon. We get some whopper big rounds here sometimes, so going around from the outside results in varying geometric shapes once the bark wood chunks are split off..

NOW you can grid it out, splitting nice neat splits, again, starting from the outside and work your way in.

Why you do this, working from the outside in on larger logs/rounds is less stuck together surface area, meaning less effort to get the wood unstuck or "split".

Whacking right down the middle in medium to large rounds is the old fashioned heavy clunky dull maul method, using brute force over proper technique. I only split down the middle if the round only needs splitting in half or quarters, anything larger than that, I go round and round first.

I like your videos though and that lever axe. I can afford the fiskars and got one of those. Leveraxe is like weeks of pay for me...so that isn't happening...but it *is* really neat looking and looks like it could work well in a lot of situations.
Check this video and the others,too. Here you can see what you just wrote. Leveraxe Vipukirves prototype - YouTube
The differences between the Leveraxe and the conventional axes are, that there is almost no friction in the Leveraxe. The leverage multiplies the splitting power even 30 times stronger . The axe blade stops on the block. In addition to this, during the 6 years existence of the Leveraxe there has happened NO ACCIDENT with it.
The reasons for these advantages can be found in my websites DESCRIPTION
 
zogger

zogger

Tree Freak
Joined
Nov 23, 2010
Messages
16,456
Location
North Georgia
Yes, that's it

Check this video and the others,too. Here you can see what you just wrote. Leveraxe Vipukirves prototype - YouTube
The differences between the Leveraxe and the conventional axes are, that there is almost no friction in the Leveraxe. The leverage multiplies the splitting power even 30 times stronger . The axe blade stops on the block. In addition to this, during the 6 years existence of the Leveraxe there has happened NO ACCIDENT with it.
The reasons for these advantages can be found in my websites DESCRIPTION
Yes, that is exactly what I mean and how I split wood here. I have done rounds well over 30 inches and around 300 lbs weight with that technique and it is fast (with the fiskars supersplitter). You can't reload any cheap hydro splitter as fast. The only thing faster is an expensive professional grade wood processor.

I like your axe a lot. It shows a LOT of thought went into the design. Get it into more mass production and some cheaper in cost, and I will try to get one then.

Also interesting there have been no accidents with your design. Can't say that for any other axe out there.

Have you ever gotten a chance to try it in any really large hardwoods? I don't know what you might have in Finland to try it out on. Or perhaps one of your clients might have bought one in the US (or elsewhere, of course) and tried it and has a report?
 
mayhem100

mayhem100

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Mar 22, 2011
Messages
508
Age
49
Location
Peru, MA
While this is an interesting pair of videos, I don't really see why these two implements would ever be compared...these tools have different purposes and are designed to do different things. The Leveraxe is a full length splitting tool and the user is splitting using vastly different techniques (inside a tire, using a different pattern, etc) and is splitting a different type of wood in what looks to be significantly warmer weather...all the variables are stacked in the Leveraxe's favor...the Fiskars looks like it did fairly well considering its basically a hatchet...I cannot imagine ever using something that size to try to split rounds...at least not safely. You can't get a good swing and the thing has no real mass so its not going to go through the wood.

How about comparing the Fiskars X27 versus the Leveraxe? Both splitting rounds from the same tree in the same conditions and using the same splitting technique to chop the round into similarly sized splits?
 
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