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Light small pruning saw whats best

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by langdon19, Oct 7, 2019.

  1. langdon19

    langdon19 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Hi all
    I currently have an 066 for cutting firewood and it has served me well for 6 years with just a coil going, i'd like to purchase a small similar saw. I'd prefer a stihl ( thats what i have) but am open to any saw.
    Things i like about the 066 that i'm after in a small version
    2 locking nuts on the bar (had a previous saw with one and had problems)
    Carb that i can work on (jets that can be removed and cleaned)
    Light
    Last the rest of my life (say 30 years)
    Heaps of cheap parts on ebay (coils carbs etc)
    Reliable
    Any ideas and input appreciated
    Cheers
     
  2. langdon19

    langdon19 ArboristSite Lurker

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    I guess it will be chopping and pruning medium to small branches, olive trees and such.
     
  3. Whiskers

    Whiskers Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Stihl 026,260,261. Oldest to newest in stihls 50cc offering. They make good limbing saws. Light enough while still having good power.
     
  4. blsnelling

    blsnelling Site Contributor

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    The MS261 fits those requirements well.
     
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  5. lone wolf

    lone wolf MS 200T King

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    Yup but a 241 with one bar nut is a better limbing saw.
     
  6. AuerX

    AuerX constantly confused

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  7. CR888

    CR888 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    A battery saw lasting 30yrs...:laugh:
     
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  8. AuerX

    AuerX constantly confused

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    I ignored that criteria on purpose as generally out of reach with current products, gas or electric.

    If the OP would settle for a good hand saw and a pair of loppers this would be much more in line with a 30 year lifetime expectation.
     
  9. Huskitoter

    Huskitoter ArboristSite Operative

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    Have you considered a pole saw? My little weak trimmer with saw attachment is one of my favorite tools. A real pole saw might be ideal.
     
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  10. sundance

    sundance ArboristSite Guru

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    Reckon I'm a wimp! When I think small and light for limbing, etc. I'm thinking my Echo CS-346 or CS-352 or something similar. Certainly not a Stihl MS261. I've got bigger saws but gravitate to the smaller lighter ones until I need to step up. I've cut a fair amount of ~12" oak with the Echos and never felt really constrained. Sure, the 036Pro is faster but the Echo is likely already in hand.

    I do it for firewood and fun, not a living so that may have some impact.
     
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  11. full chizel

    full chizel ArboristSite Guru

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    I surely wouldn’t want to prune with a 261. Limbing but not pruning. Pruning would be better with a top handle or the rear handle variant.
     
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  12. Pioneer

    Pioneer ArboristSite Operative

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    Actually I would prefer a cordless electric saw for pruning, I have lithium batteries that are 15 years old and still have 80 percent of their new capacity. That's WAY longer than the carb diaphragms last in my small saws, I seem to put carb kits in the crummy things every few years.
    Instant on, super flat torque curve, no tuning, 100 percent chance of it running after it sits idle with a storage charge for 6 months, what's not to like?
    Look at the RC world, everybody is moving to electric power, it's just way more convenient. Can't wait for prices on electric cars to come down, by the time I kick the bucket, I probably won't own an IC engine.
     
  13. catbuster

    catbuster Catskinner. And buster.

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    Yeah, for small work in stuff that won’t see much use I’d go cordless electric. Less stuff to cause problems in the driveline side. Fuel these days is not conducive to sitting for any period of time, and the smaller outdoor equipment is finally coming in par with the gas powered stuff. I mean, has anybody seen the Milwaukee M18 stuff? There’s no way I can in good faith recommend gas powered trimmers/saws/blowers to a homeowner anymore.

    Thirty year old cordless tools? Dad has a set of Dewalt drills (you know, the ones that used nickel-cadmium cells) from the 1990s and it’s 2019. They’ll last just fine if they’re not abused.
     
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  14. Pioneer

    Pioneer ArboristSite Operative

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    Yup, as I type this I'm charging the lipo batteries for my electric mower. The lipos replaced the sealed lead acid, weigh 1/4 the amount, and have a larger capacity. Run time is 45 minutes on a charge, more than enough to do my large corner lot. Oh and it's lighter than the gas powered one which I only use for bagging leaves in the fall now. The batteries are very understressed, 3 years in so far and I expect them to last a lot longer.
     
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  15. Justsaws

    Justsaws Addicted to ArboristSite

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    If you mean actually pruning trees, hard to beat a good handsaw and pruners or battery powered saw.
    If you mean removing and processing tree limbs of downed trees then the 1123 series Stihl is probably the cheapest series to rebuild in terms of aftermarket. Reliable, sure. Last the rest of your life, maybe. Lightweight, good bit lighter than the 066. Currently $300.00 new for a MS250.

    The main drawbacks to the battery powered saws is cold weather work and rain.
     
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  16. Pioneer

    Pioneer ArboristSite Operative

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    Just ran across this.

     
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  17. Spoon Carving With Tom

    Spoon Carving With Tom ArboristSite Guru

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    Stihl MS 180 will comfortably do up to and even over 12” dia green wood and a 16” bar and I can hold the saw from the handle with a single finger.
    Here I am collecting Cherry wood for carving, the logs ranged from 6” to 13” and the saw cut beautifully, I carried it all around the orchard for hours and didn’t tire me at all :)

    I’m surprised people are suggesting 261’s for pruning.:dizzy:
    E1C6E8AA-4E4C-4FDC-9098-89EADA317237.jpeg
     
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  18. langdon19

    langdon19 ArboristSite Lurker

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    Thanks for the replies guys, i need to research what has been put up. I never thought about an electric saw but it will now.
    I have a heap of good size trees to reduce the size of and a hand saw will just kill me, need something that cuts quickly.
    I have a pole saw along with the 066, need a lighter saw for all the trees i have which are too tall. I am trying to cut the height out of them to get a view back and also to get sunlight back on a lawn.
     
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  19. blsnelling

    blsnelling Site Contributor

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    Actual pruning? I'll take MS150TC any day. With a mild muffler mod and a little timing advance, I have guys using them for take downs! They're fantastic little saws.
     
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  20. ShneaSIG

    ShneaSIG ArboristSite Operative

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    To me a "pruning saw" is a small, top-handle saw, with the biggest concern being the weight. Perhaps the Echo 2511T is the current saw to beat in that category - it's very lightweight. If you're looking for something with a little more cut capacity, a 40-50cc saw is probably where it's at. I like Stihl, so that's probably the 241 or 261, but I think you can safely go for just about any saw in that class from any of the major producers and be happy with your purchase, especially if you're buying a "pro" line saw.
     
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