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Log Splitter Build

cookies

cookies

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add a temp sensor to keep a eye on hydraulic oil running temp , most manufacturers make them rectangular for less heat retention. about 150-160f is about the max you want to see under heavy use.
 
sean donato

sean donato

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I think you wedge will be fine, running a 5" cylinder myself. Broke a few till I reinforced the back side of it. My beam is lighter as well. I have a bolt on 4 way I use from time to time, but its next to useless in big wood, or if your having knot issues. My wedge is also more wedge shaped, and yours is more of a knife, so I think you'll have less of an issue then I had. Also if your 4 way can go flat with the table you'll have less issue and get more use out of the wedge. Mins is also fixed height, so that's been an issue from time to time. (For me) I too agree your ram is too short, but could have been mitigated by backing your wedge off a few inches from the full extended position. I have a 24" ram and a 4 inch stand off to the wedge, havent had issue with wood not splitting because of it. I also have a log lift, wouldnt be without it. Saved my back over the old splitter I used to borrow. I think you'll be quite happy with the 22gpm, I'm currently running 16gpm it's a tad slow but I cant work a whole lot faster then it goes anyway. I also echo the sentiment about auto cycle valves, had mega issues getting them consistent on a log processor I had worked on. Not worth the trouble imo. Auto return is all that's really needed.
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

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add a temp sensor to keep a eye on hydraulic oil running temp , most manufacturers make them rectangular for less heat retention. about 150-160f is about the max you want to see under heavy use.
With a small engine running a 22 GPM pump I just can not see heat as an issue. On a warm day splitting all day could prove to be a worry. Easy remedy is just weld some tubing the length of the I beam. Thanks
 
Wood Hound

Wood Hound

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or look here:

 
JakefromCharlotte

JakefromCharlotte

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Lets try this again.....

More work on the frame last weekend.

img_4521-jpg.893890


And was able to source a pump locally. Is it ok to mount the upside down? I would like to move the inlet to the side coolest to the tank.

IMG_4529.JPG
 

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motorhead99999

motorhead99999

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Sharon springs ny
I run a Honda gx390 with a 28 gpm 2stage pump and have never had a heat issue. I run a 4” cylinder on it but it is set up for a 6” which I have Incase I want to run that. I split a lot of hard maple, red oak, beach and hickory up to 28” range and have only stopped the splitter twice that I can recall and that was with a nasty headrow hard maple that had a zillion knots in it. I run a 4 way that just slips over why wedge on stuff in the 10-18” range after that it’s pointless.
My feed line runs from the front of the tank down the edge of the I beam about 4-5’ thinking I would have a heat issue but never have had one. 0B9BC0D4-A380-4679-886A-3315371FB46A.jpeg 6293F73F-0959-422B-B2B7-30A433057DB1.jpeg C21AD3C7-F936-4E6D-BAE9-0DB9AA056F1D.jpeg At some point I plan on adding onto my table towards the motor the length of my stroke so I don’t have to do the balancing act with huge rounds anymore. The reason for the table behind the wedge is because it is perfect height to go in my dump trailer so I just push the wood in there with the next split so I don’t have to touch it a bunch of times. It also piles the wood up on the ground nice if I don’t use the trailer it will push it up 4-5’ high without me touching it
 
JakefromCharlotte

JakefromCharlotte

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I run a Honda gx390 with a 28 gpm 2stage pump and have never had a heat issue. I run a 4” cylinder on it but it is set up for a 6” which I have Incase I want to run that. I split a lot of hard maple, red oak, beach and hickory up to 28” range and have only stopped the splitter twice that I can recall and that was with a nasty headrow hard maple that had a zillion knots in it. I run a 4 way that just slips over why wedge on stuff in the 10-18” range after that it’s pointless.
My feed line runs from the front of the tank down the edge of the I beam about 4-5’ thinking I would have a heat issue but never have had one. At some point I plan on adding onto my table towards the motor the length of my stroke so I don’t have to do the balancing act with huge rounds anymore. The reason for the table behind the wedge is because it is perfect height to go in my dump trailer so I just push the wood in there with the next split so I don’t have to touch it a bunch of times. It also piles the wood up on the ground nice if I don’t use the trailer it will push it up 4-5’ high without me touching it

The Big Bertha is so sweet!
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

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On my splitter I have run into heat issues many times. On a 90F day splitting Oak which is not the toughest I handle. The fittings get so hot that when you touch them it will cause a blister on your hand. I have had to stop several times in the past four years. Most of the heavy duty spitting has been at 8,000 feet so heat was not as big as deal. At 4,000 feet working more than four hours will become too hot to continue. So have installed some tubing onto the back bone of the splitter to dissipate heat. Can not say how effective the system is because I have not split during extreme conditions lately. Thanks
 
JakefromCharlotte

JakefromCharlotte

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Like the drill press...
Thanks. It's one of those "how did I live without it before" tools. The annular cutters are in the same category.
Looks heavy duty , might I suggest you weld some grips on the push plate face.
Will do. I was thinking 1/4 x 1/4 strips with teeth cut into them.
On my splitter I have run into heat issues many times. On a 90F day splitting Oak which is not the toughest I handle. The fittings get so hot that when you touch them it will cause a blister on your hand. I have had to stop several times in the past four years. Most of the heavy duty spitting has been at 8,000 feet so heat was not as big as deal. At 4,000 feet working more than four hours will become too hot to continue. So have installed some tubing onto the back bone of the splitter to dissipate heat. Can not say how effective the system is because I have not split during extreme conditions lately. Thanks
Is the tubing on the return side?

I am probably going to order the Prince valves this week so I can start design work on the fluid distribution layout. I'm planning to get a single detent valve with power beyond for the main cylinder, and a separate double valve for the wedge and lift.

Will both valve banks need a separate return line to the tank?
Will I need a check valve on either of the return lines?
Any advantage to getting the SAE thread over the NPT thread valves?

-Jake
 
Ted Jenkins

Ted Jenkins

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Is the tubing on the return side? -Jake
It does not matter where or how tubing is welded to what as long as there is a large amount of surface to a large amount of the structure of the splitter. Heavy wall tubing tubing is easy to weld to the I beam thus because of a large amount of contact to the metal structure will transfer heat to the main body of the splitter. By doing this the entire chassis of the splitter becomes a radiator. If tubing is used it should be at least as large as the plumbing so not to cause resistance. Using return line would be easier than worrying about the high pressure side of system. Instead of using an I beam I stacked two 4'' sections of heavy wall tubing as the back bone. Thanks
 
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