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Looking for Slivers (Wood Chipper)

Samuel.M.Peyton

Samuel.M.Peyton

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Jun 9, 2013
Messages
10
Age
27
Location
Tennessee
Good morning folks,

I hope you all had a great Christmas and New Years. I have a project coming up in the next 6 months that I need some wood slivers for. I’ll have a 12” bandit 250xp PTO chipper on a 140 hp Kubota, but as you know . . . our chippers are good at making chips . . . not slivers (assuming the anvil is square, the knives are sharp and the gap between the 2 is set properly).

My question is:

Do you think if I increased the gap between my knife and anvil on the 250xp (with a square anvil and sharp knives) that I could get the slivers I am looking for? A 2”+ long sliver would be ideal.

I understand the wear and tear this can put on the bearings of the machine. I don’t mind limiting the material I put in to 5”-6” rather than the 10” to 12” that it can eat. What do you think?

If those horizontal grinders weren’t so expensive I would just get one of those. The smallest bandit beast (1425) was quoted at $125k . . . and I would rent a machine, but there’s no way to get it back to the property (2,500+ ft. of poor clay rd.).

What would you do?

Thanks in advance,

Samuel
 
Samuel.M.Peyton

Samuel.M.Peyton

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Jun 9, 2013
Messages
10
Age
27
Location
Tennessee
My experience in getting slivers is when the chipper is way too dull. I'm curious, what do you need slivers for?
Mike,

Thank you taking the time to respond. I have 2,500 ft. -3,000 ft. of access rd. that I can’t afford to gravel. The logger that just did a select cut on the property said he put around $20,000 in stone down (one course). That stone is already starting to disappear in many places. A permanent rd. (Requiring 3 courses of different sized stone) might reach up towards $60,000).

My plan was to fix the water problem on the road (make a lot of runouts) and then put down 18” - 24” of wood chips. I understand this is a temporary fix. I just figured that since we have hundreds of tree tops on the property that need to be cleaned up . . . why not. Doing tree work and possibly land clearing, I should be able to keep the rd. topped off every year.

When it comes to chips, I want larger chips so that they will bridge better and be less likely to push out from under a tire. Originally I was looking at buying a larger disk chipper, but I may just rent a larger drum chipper for a week and see what I can generate with it . . .
 
mikewhite85

mikewhite85

ArboristSite Guru
Joined
Sep 3, 2009
Messages
651
Age
34
Location
Wellsboro, PA
Website
www.treemasterllc.com
Ah, I see.

The problem with trying to make slivers is that it will be very frustrating and slow trying to chip and will cause a lot of wear and tear on the engine and bearings. I'd just make regular chips and go with it.

Alternatively, a relatively inexpensive and better road base option would be asphalt millings. If there is any local roadwork they might even dump it for free.
 
Samuel.M.Peyton

Samuel.M.Peyton

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Jun 9, 2013
Messages
10
Age
27
Location
Tennessee
Ah, I see.

The problem with trying to make slivers is that it will be very frustrating and slow trying to chip and will cause a lot of wear and tear on the engine and bearings. I'd just make regular chips and go with it.

Alternatively, a relatively inexpensive and better road base option would be asphalt millings. If there is any local roadwork they might even dump it for free.
Thanks for the reply man! Some folks have mentioned that to me. I’m just not sure if they would be willing to take the 20-30 detour to the property. :/ I guess I’ll just have to ask.
 
BC WetCoast

BC WetCoast

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Oct 30, 2007
Messages
3,161
Location
Vancouver
We dumped at a farm a while ago, so the farmer had an access road for his tractor. The ground was silty alluvial soil, with standing water in the area. During the wetter season, we werent able to drive the truck down the trail as our tires would punch through.

What i would suggest, is what we did in swampy logging roads, we would take tops, flip over stumps rotten logs etc and then gravel over it. The debis provided enough flotation so we didnt lose the gravel. So you could consider laying down tops and brush, the put layers of chips on top. Alternatively, put down some geotextile fabric as a base and then chips om top of that.
 
Samuel.M.Peyton

Samuel.M.Peyton

ArboristSite Lurker
Joined
Jun 9, 2013
Messages
10
Age
27
Location
Tennessee
We dumped at a farm a while ago, so the farmer had an access road for his tractor. The ground was silty alluvial soil, with standing water in the area. During the wetter season, we werent able to drive the truck down the trail as our tires would punch through.

What i would suggest, is what we did in swampy logging roads, we would take tops, flip over stumps rotten logs etc and then gravel over it. The debis provided enough flotation so we didnt lose the gravel. So you could consider laying down tops and brush, the put layers of chips on top. Alternatively, put down some geotextile fabric as a base and then chips om top of that.

Thanks for the advice BC WetCoast!
 
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