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McCulloch Chain Saws

northwest saws

northwest saws

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I would second the diesel. Let it soak in diesel or a penetrating oil if you have enough of it. I've run into your kind of predicament before and chances of keeping the paint in good shape aren't great. Letting it soak might keep ya from destroying the paint but with what you're describing I wouldn't be too hopeful. Sorry probably not what you want to hear.

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2broke2ride

2broke2ride

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I have tried gasoline, brake clean, acetone, and my parts washer solvent which is basically mineral spirits and none of that will touch this stuff. I am thinking a petroleum based product is not the answer, just not sure what the answer is.

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2broke2ride

2broke2ride

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For the fuel line problem I use True Blue made by Stens.It's a Tygon fuel line that's blue in color & stands up to ethanol well.I stopped getting ethanol laden fuel a little over a yr.ago now,but I still continue to use the True Blue.It's fairly cheap too,I buy a 25 ft.coil in a box for $18-$25 depending on the size.I get it on eBay & it usually has free shipping.
I am actually a Stens dealer and keep that line in stock, I don't necessarily care for it because it is kind of stiff but I might give it a try.

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Woodslasher

Woodslasher

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I have tried gasoline, brake clean, acetone, and my parts washer solvent which is basically mineral spirits and none of that will touch this stuff. I am thinking a petroleum based product is not the answer, just not sure what the answer is.

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“A drop of Dawn and grease is gone!”
 
northwest saws

northwest saws

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I have tried gasoline, brake clean, acetone, and my parts washer solvent which is basically mineral spirits and none of that will touch this stuff. I am thinking a petroleum based product is not the answer, just not sure what the answer is.

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Specifically have you tried letting it soak in diesel? I know you may be skeptical of petroleum products at this point but letting it soak specifically in diesel for 2 or 3 days might be the trick. Or may loosen it up enough to gently scrape it off. Otherwise I'm not sure what else to use that won't damage the paint and metal.

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heimannm

heimannm

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Dike, Iowa
Dan has the right answer, either Dawn dishwashing detergent or one of the water/ammonia base cleaners like Purple Power or Simple Green. I used the purple stuff on a tar/varnished fuel tank and the results were spectacular.

DSCN4575.jpg

DSCN4576.jpg

That took about 15 minutes with a spray bottle and a toothbrush.

Here is a photo of the 10 Series/600 Series flywheel side bearing FYI.

20200930_072353.jpg

Mark
 
Brian Thacker

Brian Thacker

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Heat the diesel to around 125 degrees and let it soak for an hour or so. I know heat really makes the difference in the ultrasonic. They say that it opens the pores in the metal and it lets go of the dirt, or what ever is in the pores. I know in carbs, it really helps it to clean.. I have taken many old barn find motorcycles and soaked the carbs in the heated ultrasonic, carbs that you would not think could be salvaged and them come out really clean. Here is a carb off a 1968 Honda CT-90 after I got done with it. I wished I had before pictures to show you.

Brian
 

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Manic84

Manic84

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Brian T - Apparently, yes it does. I think the smoke can foul up things over time (maybe jethro can set the record straight?)
But from what I've been told, the wood is deceptively heavy/dense and dulls your chain Fast. It's probably worse if you live in an arid environment.

2Broke - Dawn soap is a great suggestion, never underestimate it's power. Spray a good mix of it on the gunk and let it soak in for a bit. Dawn and hot water seems to work the best when I use it to cut through some real nasty stuff. Again, let it set for a bit.
I don't know what could resist gas or acetone... is the gunk like a sap-like mixture or oily?

On a side note with true blue: It is really stiff and inflexible at first, but it kinda softens over time when exposed to fuel. The softness doesn't last long though and it has quite a bit of tensile strength and likes to return to it's shape. (T1000 style!)
It looks durable and I haven't seen it fail yet, but who knows?
 
T_zero

T_zero

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Portugal
Hello.
I have one question to ask:
Does someone know where the following washer spring is used in a Pro Mac 850 ??
If not, in what model from the McCulloch line-up ?? And where ??

outside diameter 9mm
inside diameter 5mm
20201016_215413.jpg

I bet the correct name for this is washer spring, but correct me if I'm wrong.

Thanks
 
Maintenance supervisor

Maintenance supervisor

Every 100yrs, All new people...
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2broke,
Once I exhaust any petroleum products cleaner I usually do go with purple power, mean green, or Awsome . I dump parts in a bucket and come back 2 days later and everything rinses off but at that point I've given up on the paint and stickers.
 
2broke2ride

2broke2ride

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So in spite of the rough looking piston, a carb rebuild and a little elbow grease made this one a solid runner, just gotta figure out why the auto oiler is refusing to work. The manual one is working fine so that is what I'm doing for now lol. I need to pick up another spool of chain and get a 20 inch bar on it, can't understand a 16 inch on a 60cc saw! I have bars, just out of chain at the moment lol.


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leecopland

leecopland

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So in spite of the rough looking piston, a carb rebuild and a little elbow grease made this one a solid runner, just gotta figure out why the auto oiler is refusing to work. The manual one is working fine so that is what I'm doing for now lol. I need to pick up another spool of chain and get a 20 inch bar on it, can't understand a 16 inch on a 60cc saw! I have bars, just out of chain at the moment lol.


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Try some really thin oil, worked for me.
 
Jethro 2t sniffer

Jethro 2t sniffer

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Brian T - Apparently, yes it does. I think the smoke can foul up things over time (maybe jethro can set the record straight?)
But from what I've been told, the wood is deceptively heavy/dense and dulls your chain Fast. It's probably worse if you live in an arid environment.

2Broke - Dawn soap is a great suggestion, never underestimate it's power. Spray a good mix of it on the gunk and let it soak in for a bit. Dawn and hot water seems to work the best when I use it to cut through some real nasty stuff. Again, let it set for a bit.
I don't know what could resist gas or acetone... is the gunk like a sap-like mixture or oily?

On a side note with true blue: It is really stiff and inflexible at first, but it kinda softens over time when exposed to fuel. The softness doesn't last long though and it has quite a bit of tensile strength and likes to return to it's shape. (T1000 style!)
It looks durable and I haven't seen it fail yet, but who knows?

It does burn great not sure about the fouling things up though as long as you sweep the chimney every season its fine. Heck most of us burn anything if need be sticky old radiata pine is one of my favourites its like gas on a fire and if seasoned well its fine. Bluegum is great firewood and grows quickly too those trees are only 20 or 25 years old.

Dulls chain hmmm yeah it can be a bit hard on it but not real bad I pumped 5 tanks on the 850 yesterday and still sharp. If not the best on the file it makes you pay for it and that's why most average Joe smiths struggle to get it cut and they file n file n file and it gets worse n worse as nobody knows about lowering the rakers. I used to be that guy and that's where the hard to cut reputation comes from. well around here anyway.

Dead standing can be very very hard and depth gouges are crucial for a smooth cut
 
northwest saws

northwest saws

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north idaho
Anyone happen to have a 740, 1-75 or 1-76 they would like to sell me? I need another good project to obsess over. Got an mc92 kart motor i want to put in to something!

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Maintenance supervisor

Maintenance supervisor

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It does burn great not sure about the fouling things up though as long as you sweep the chimney every season its fine. Heck most of us burn anything if need be sticky old radiata pine is one of my favourites its like gas on a fire and if seasoned well its fine. Bluegum is great firewood and grows quickly too those trees are only 20 or 25 years old.

Dulls chain hmmm yeah it can be a bit hard on it but not real bad I pumped 5 tanks on the 850 yesterday and still sharp. If not the best on the file it makes you pay for it and that's why most average Joe smiths struggle to get it cut and they file n file n file and it gets worse n worse as nobody knows about lowering the rakers. I used to be that guy and that's where the hard to cut reputation comes from. well around here anyway.

Dead standing can be very very hard and depth gouges are crucial for a smooth cut
Yeah I've heard that the tree grows so fast that it traps alot of debris it the bark and rings which contribute to dulling the chain.
I used to be the depth guage guy too.
When I started to understand more about sharpening I bacame the filing hero at work.
I cut alot of trees in campgrounds and around farms ,so if I didn't pick up on sharpening a chain I would probably spend alot of money or be discouraged to cut .
I find children will stuff anything they can when there's a knot hole at head level, I've hit rocks, hot wheels cars, pop cans, and alot of nails.
 
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