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Mimosa tree help

Discussion in 'Homeowner Helper Forum' started by scott holland, Jul 29, 2018.

  1. scott holland

    scott holland New Member

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    I bought and planted this tree about 30 days ago. I was told to deep water once a week until fully established. I was also told to put 3 ounces of root stimulator once a week for a month. When I first planted the tree it rained on and off heavily for about a week. The Mimosa looked great up until 1 week ago and the top limbs started to loose leaves, the lower section is still producing pink flowers in the mornings but by days end they are all wilted. it is 100 degrees on a daily basis. I showed this picture to a garden center and they said I was either watering too much or too little. I have never planted anything and have no idea what to do. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks
     

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  2. jomoco

    jomoco Tree Freak

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    Albissia jullibrissin's are deciduous trees, and a little dieback after planting's not unusual, particularly in hot weather.

    Be patient, water once a week, and exnay with the rooting hormones, no more.

    I'd rip that lawn out to a six foot circle and cover with mulch.

    Good luck mate they are gorgeous trees.

    Be aware they are on the susceptible tree species list for the shot hole borer.

    Jomoco
     
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  3. scott holland

    scott holland New Member

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    Thanks for the reply.How much water should I give it and at what rate? I will head to the big box store and buy some mulch ASAP, and I'll be patient.
     
  4. jomoco

    jomoco Tree Freak

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    Give it a slow drip soaking once a week.

    I'd put a wire screen barrier around it as well since varmints like rabbits n rats like the taste of mimosa bark n cambium, num num!

    Jomoco
     
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  5. scott holland

    scott holland New Member

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    I did as suggested and put the mulch around the tree and water once a week at a slow drip. The Tree has not improved but it has not gotten any worse. my question now is, should I clip the dead seed pods off that are weighing down the limbs or let them fall off naturally
     
  6. no tree to big

    no tree to big Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Let's see a updated pic

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
     
  7. scott holland

    scott holland New Member

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    Taken 08/05/2018
     

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  8. jomoco

    jomoco Tree Freak

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    Don't cut the pods off Scott, their weight's instrumental for proper trunk taper development.

    Jomoco
     
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  9. old CB

    old CB ArboristSite Operative

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    Jomoco's steering you right.

    Anything you transplant is subject to the shock of that event. The heat and extreme sun of summer compounds that shock. So if your tree has not succumbed completely, you're probably fine.

    Treat it right and it'll probably thrive in the long term.

    A week of heavy rain off and on was likely the best introduction to a new location that your tree could have had.
     
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  10. narrowback77

    narrowback77 New Member

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    Im not an expert by any means but I have 2 Mimosas here at the house and a bunch throughout the neighborhood. Both at our house have been transplanted from where they "volunteered". One by my mother in law and one by me.
    The one that I moved was moved 30' to its present location in 2012. It started as a 5' tall tree with a 1-1/2" trunk. I moved it right after it had leafed out in the spring (mistake #1) with a 2' root ball (which promptly fell apart before I could get it into its' new location). The tree quickly lost all of its leaves and any pods that it might have had and within a week or so looked dead. I watered it throughout the rest of the year until the rains came hoping it would come back. The following spring, I had what looked like a sawed off branch sticking out of the ground that was dry as a match stick. It was dead and I was sure I had killed it.

    I got busy toward the end of '13 and never got around to cutting that poor tree down. It was an eyesore and I knew it had to go but I was scrambling to make the house payment and the tree was the last thing on my mind.

    Spring of '14 rolled around and I had gotten so used to seeing the black branch in front of the house that I didn't believe the Mrs. when she called me at work to tell me that the tree that she had asked me to take down 20 times already had started to leaf out. From there it kept on going.

    Its now a beautiful 12' or so tall tree with a canopy that is as wide or slightly wider. Trunk is near 5" diameter and seems to be thriving. During hot weather, the leaves droop every day only to return to normal the next. It gets regular water a couple times a week. More in the heat. None in fall / winter.

    The Mother in law's tree is almost double the size of mine.

    Like I said in the beginning, I'm not an expert by any stretch of the imagination, but the Mimosa seems to be a pretty resilient tree (even fairly prolific) around here. Mine played possum for the better part of 2 years and if I hadn't been lazy, would have been firewood.

    These days I leave the moving of trees to people who do that kind of thing professionally.
     
  11. JTM

    JTM ArboristSite Guru

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    If ever a weed were a tree.... My money is on it flourishing.
     
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  12. TNTreeHugger

    TNTreeHugger Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Are we talking about the same Mimosa that is on the invasive species list?
    If so, your neighbors will hate you in a few years.
    I planted three in my yard 25 years ago. They are extremely prolific with the seed pods, they come up everywhere and are next to impossible to get rid of.
    Granted, it is a beautiful tree, with beautiful (sickening) sweet-smelling blooms and the hummers and butterflies love them, too, but if you plant one, in no time at all you'll have a million.

    https://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/plant-directory/albizia-julibrissin/
     

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