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Motivation and staying motivated

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by Saiso, Feb 27, 2019.

  1. Saiso

    Saiso Mountain Ranger

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    Yeah, my oldest only turned 2 a few days ago. Youngest is 5 months. I’m hoping to bring my oldest from times to times and like you said, may try putting him somewhere safe and in my vision when processing wood. He loves to help already so shouldn’t be a problem.

    Thanks :)
     
  2. Saiso

    Saiso Mountain Ranger

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    Yeah you’re right. I work 40 hours a week (which is considered FT here) but commute an hour each way. I wake up at 530 but have no time on work days to get anything done in the morning.

    I’ll just have to be smart and use my available time as well as I could. Everything also takes longer in a small off grid cabin with running water/electricity :)
     
  3. James Miller

    James Miller Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I've been averaging around 60 hours a week since last June. I work nights and that helps a lot in my opinion. Drop my daughter (6) at school at 730 and get a few hours in doing whatever needs done usually with my son (3) following if I'm at the house. Lay down around 11am back up by 3 when my wife gets home from picking my daughter up. Spend time with the kids for awhile and either go back to bed or spend time with the wife when we put them to bed between 7-8.
    I agree with earlier poster that said any machinery is better the none. We have an old kabota tractor we use to mow, plow, and move wood with. One machine does multiple jobs and saves us a lot of time.
     
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  4. al-k

    al-k cuten wood

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    Every one has their own things that motivate them. You can spend your whole life working your but off to make a better life for you and your family and miss out on what family is all about.
    I worked 80+ hours a week for a long time and cleared our lot, built the house then a barn. Plowed snow in the winter for extra money. That is with a full time job. I have got every thing done I once thought was so important, house is paid off really do not have many bills. I'm getting SS now and work part time so lots of free time, thing is my son is now 40 and he is working his butt off and I lost my wife last year. Now I sit hear in what I though was so important to me wishing I new my son better, wishing I had spent more time with my wife. I'm not saying don't work hard for what you want just don't let the little things pass you by. I wish you the best on your journey.
     
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  5. DSW

    DSW ArboristSite Guru

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    Very well said.

    I choose to live within my means. 50-60-70+ hours, then with side jobs, family, feeding a stove and shoveling in winter, mowing in summer. Working on vehicles, house, etc....I've done it.

    I find the simpler I can make my life the happier I usually am.
     
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  6. sirbuildalot

    sirbuildalot ArboristSite Guru

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    Yeah, things like eating, bathing, cleaning your house, cooking, having kids do homework, etc.

    I don't know anyone except maybe a bachelor living in a trailer who can devote 100% of there free time to cutting firewood. If you do have kids you may want to read al-k's post.
     
  7. Saiso

    Saiso Mountain Ranger

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    Sweet, thanks!
    Yeah, I work some 12-8pm for fire standby and 2-10pm teaching firearms and safety so I’ll probably be able to get more work done on those days.

    I’m definitely going to keep an eye open for an old, used, good shape tractor this summer. May be able to finance through the bank and get a small loan.
     
  8. Jeffkrib

    Jeffkrib ArboristSite Guru

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    I would have thought living in -35 deg temps would be motivation enough to have a huge stack of firewood!
    Seriously though if your living on 100 acres of the grid with a young family then your living a life many would be jealous of. From my experience (my kids are a few years ahead of yours) the issue LOL is having 2 kids under the age of 2.
    Just stick it out your life will become so much easier once they reach the magic age of 4. They will be so much easier but the trade off is they won’t be as cute.
    Another thing which is pretty cool is having your own trees to harvest and the whole process of cutting, stacking then burning your own wood to keep your family warm and cosy, It’s pretty cool.
    And on the topic of working long hours, as much as I applaud hard work to get ahead no one ever lies on their death bed and says “I wish I spent more time at work”.
    Jeff
     
  9. Saiso

    Saiso Mountain Ranger

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    Understood, thank you.
    I’m sorry about your wife.
     
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  10. Saiso

    Saiso Mountain Ranger

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    You’re right. That’s why I’ve been prioritizing family for the last couple years. We started everything all at once. Buying land, renovating cabin to live in, have kids, now planning our homestead. It’s just a bit overwhelming sometime but all your stories help motivate me. Just recently acquired a truck so should be easier this season.

    I also used to be a seasonal ranger but was appointed FT 2 winters ago. Since then, there isn’t much done in the winter months.
     
  11. moondoggie

    moondoggie Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Well said. Thanks for sharing.
     
  12. Saiso

    Saiso Mountain Ranger

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    Out of everyone’s expertise and experience, is it quicker to junk to 16” in the woods then load truck/trailer or to yard at 4-8 ft lengths, load truck, bring to cabin and then process?

    I normally bring the logs out at 4-8 ft lengths but I’ve been cutting a lot on my trails this winter so the accessibility will be easier and quicker. My guess is process to 16” right there and then, load, pile?
     
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  13. sirbuildalot

    sirbuildalot ArboristSite Guru

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    You're going to get a variety of opinions on this. If you have machinery capable of handling logs, I think bringing the logs to a cleared processing area makes the most sense. If you don't have the machinery to handle logs, I think you have little choice but to cut them to firewood length in the woods. Unless they are tiny diameter logs that is.
     
  14. sirbuildalot

    sirbuildalot ArboristSite Guru

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    Choppy/Valley,

    With all due respect, one month ago you claimed 70-90 hrs/week, as ValleyFirewood I can recall a 80-100 claim. Now its 100-120. How many hours a week do you really work? I don't think anyone believes a claim of 17 hrs/day 7 days/week.




    Post #6 in this thread
    https://www.arboristsite.com/community/threads/side-jobs.327941/#post-6765992
     
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  15. bowtechmadman

    bowtechmadman Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Thanks for sharing Al-k, great perspective we all too often take family/loved ones for granted that they will always be there.
     
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  16. Trapper_Pete

    Trapper_Pete ArboristSite Operative

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    it all depends on what you have to move them and how far you need to move them.

    but one guy buy himself cutting where he can basically back the truck up to it ,like drive way clearing , as long as you can keep your bar out of the dirt cut your rounds on site and load the truck that way you can split it as it comes off the truck and stack it as you split.

    some of it comes down to efficiency in the woods vs total time on the wood.

    fall , buck , load , split, stack vs fall , skid , buck , split ,stack

    a minimum 5 processes no matter what you do 4 of them take essentially the same time no matter.

    skidding can also lead to dirt in the bark when not done on snow , this costs time and $ in chain sharpening.

    when skidding is a big time savings over loading , big enough to cover the cost of the tractor then it wins , when the tractor will get you places the truck will not it gains value, but that takes a lot of wood to make it pay for it'self.

    you may still want / need a tractor say for snow clearing it may pay for it's self there and then be handy in wood gathering.

    I have been looking at tractors for years , but I just never can justify one.
     
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  17. Saiso

    Saiso Mountain Ranger

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    Very fun to read. You’re right on a lot of things. So I’m guessing you have a skidder to bring the logs out? I wouldn’t have the issue of dirt in the bark much because I’d be using pulp hooks for probably no more than 100m (I’ll try to limit my cutting to shorter distances from truck if possible).

    So, everything I cut along trail side will be junked into 16” pieces and straight in the box of the truck.

    I have another question..
    Am I better off buying a 4x8 or similar trailer to load more junked wood (or anything else, for that matter) or what they call a “log” trailer for 8-12’ lengths? Is it more practical to be able to haul logs too? Or is a regular utility trailer more practical?

    Note we only have a rough woods Tacoma but with a brand new frame in 2016. I plan on stripping the box this summer and making some sort of flatbed with removal sides/tailgate.

    I also plan on selling some 8-16’ lengths of fir and spruce to a local mill for a few bucks.

    Thanks :)
     
  18. Ryan'smilling

    Ryan'smilling Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Trailers are something you can't have too many of. Personally I'd suggest a road-worthy two axle car-hauler type trailer, 16-18' long. Then keep your eye out for an old junky two wheel trailer to keep on the property and drive around in the woods. Something small, maneuverable, and cheap.
     
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  19. Trapper_Pete

    Trapper_Pete ArboristSite Operative

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    I cut at the farm the farm has both tractor and skid steer , needed for the live stock operations.
    I schedule with my friend who owns the farm time when we can work together and take down the trees the farm wants down, dead , dying , in the way. he runs the tractor or skid steer I cut.
    we stack the logs near the road where I can get in with my truck and cut and load rounds any time I feel like , I am only doing fire wood , we do have a few logs set aside for the saw mill one of his farm hands has a relative with a mill.

    most of the time he runs the skid steer with forks on. I pile the brush he takes it to the brush pile , I cut the logs to manageable lengths for the path we have to get to the pile generally 8-12 feet .
    however even given free use of machinery , time wise I still find times where it makes more sense because of the obstacles in the way or the distance to the pile to cut rounds and roll them over to where he can get the skid steer or where I can load them in the truck if it is a distance issue although not all that often.

    generally I can fell it , buck off the first 8 foot log then go work on brush while he takes that to the pile , when he comes back he takes brush , then a few more logs and I am on to falling the next tree

    it really depends am I waiting on the tractor or will the tractor be waiting on me ? If I am waiting on the tractor or spending the day as a chain jockey to get logs skidded out to where they can be picked up with the forks because of all the obstacles cutting rounds and moving them 50 feet to pallets he can come pick up and take right over to where they can be loaded at the road makes more sense.

    is your bed rusting out bad enough to not hold a load any more ? if the sides are still holding a sheet of plywood in the bet often gets you more usable years
    a Tacoma or nearly any truck less than a 1 ton run out of weight capacity long before they run out of room to stack rounds especially with side boards.

    moving logs gets expensive quick , the question you need to weigh is what will the logs pay and what will it cost you to get them there? will your truck even pull that load ? having not sold saw mill logs I don't know.

    say you pick up a equipment trailer and outfit it with a winch you get a good deal and you have 2500 in the rig , you can only load about 2 ton of logs on it before your tacoma can't safely pull it say that is 6 logs what do 6 logs pay at the sawmill? how far is the mill ?
     
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  20. Saiso

    Saiso Mountain Ranger

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    Yeah all I need right now is something smaller for the woods. A lot of our acreage has decent trails. The local mill is only a few km’s away, all back roads. :rolleyes: Wasn’t sure whether to get a small 4x8 or a log trailer. Probably will go for a standard utility trailer so I can do more than just move logs.
     
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