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MS250 vs MS261..not the kind of thread you think

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by husqORbust, Oct 11, 2019.

  1. Whinbush

    Whinbush ArboristSite Operative

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    Same here, the average man without special tools can replace crank bearings and seals on a
    Clam Shell, the so called pro saws with the split case will stop anyone without the special
    tools in their tracks.
    I can see the day when the Clam She’ll will take over, it’s easier to produce and every bit as reliable,
    Only needs the frames to be beefed up a bit, if the same effort and light materials and frames were toughened
    up to withstand pro use, what more would you want.
    Modders might not be happy, but my take is buy a bigger saw if you need more power.
     
  2. Andyshine77

    Andyshine77 Tree Freak

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    I wouldn't say say clamshell saws are just as reliable. A bigger saw = more weight, a ported saw can give you the power of a larger saw without the weight. They're other benefits to a mag case that can never be had with a clamshell. You can't even have proper case volume or proper transfer design with a clamshell.
     
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  3. holeycow

    holeycow Addicted to ArboristSite

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    MS250 on sale; 459.95 cad Stihl canada

    That's plenty.
     
  4. TheTone

    TheTone ArboristSite Guru

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    And there's no such thing as a gasket delete. Don't get me wrong, I do both pro saws and clamshells. I'm not pushing either one; they both have their place. I just don't have the usual aversion to working on clamshells.
     
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  5. Joseph Huckabaa

    Joseph Huckabaa ArboristSite Lurker

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    I bought an MS250 about 6 years ago. It’s my first saw. The first one I had ever run and still the only one to this day that I have ran. I had to figure out how to run it on my own. So needless to say it’s somewhat “ragged” out. I can honestly say the only problems I have had from it were from operator error. As long as I don’t leave gas in it for long I can give it 2 pulls on full choke and it will cough and then start with 1 pull from half choke. I can’t really complain about it but then again I have nothing to compare it to.


    Joseph Huckabaa
     
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  6. holeycow

    holeycow Addicted to ArboristSite

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    It's a decent saw.

    But when you buy your next one, buy a pro saw. There is a (big) difference.

    I was quite fortunate in that I bought a Jonsered 590 for my first saw. I had only run bigger pro saws like a 266xp, a 262xp, a 181, a 272 (borrowed for little jobs) before that one. Something like that, anyway?! The little 590 ran like a saw ran, to me.

    I thought all saws ran like raped apes..

    But no.
     
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  7. Woodslasher

    Woodslasher Make McCulloch Great Again!

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    I've agree running pro saws are great, but my MS361 refuses to start anymore and has just been a thorn in my side since I got it as the more I fix on it the less it works. Even the greatest saw ever made, my 346xp, I ended up trading off as it felt heavier than a 372. It was a great cutter, but it felt so darned heavy I'd always reach for my MS250 instead.
     
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  8. holeycow

    holeycow Addicted to ArboristSite

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    My 2152 feel light as a feather..almost.??

    It's the Jonsered equivalent of the 353, which is largely the same as your 346.

    Yes, the MS250 is a decent feeling saw, I agree.:clap:

    PS, the greatest saw ever made (50cc anyway) is a Jonsered 590

    :chainsaw: :laugh:
     
  9. Whinbush

    Whinbush ArboristSite Operative

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    W
    Whats to stop the designer getting proper port locations and sizing or volume in a Clam Shell,
    sure some saws have stuffers that take up volume, and Magnesium is used in Clam Shells too.
     
  10. Andyshine77

    Andyshine77 Tree Freak

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    The transfers can't be feed from the case, because there is none. Husky had a different design at one point with a little block the bolted into a case, so you could have a regular bolt on cylinder. It was kind of a hybrid plastic case saw.
     
  11. Whinbush

    Whinbush ArboristSite Operative

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    I think the main reason for the ms250 being what it is is cost, it and other saws
    in the non pro category are made as well as they can be without encroaching
    into the more pro orientated saw territory, there has to be pro grade for the
    week in week out saw guys, and then there is the cheaper line that serve a completely
    different purpose.
    If a lot of cutting is expected then the more expensive pro grade MS261 would be
    better in every way to the MS250, big power difference, and a stronger more durable
    platform too. Like everything else it depends on the work you need to do, and how
    quickly you need it done, I use the lightest saw possible when am at my own work,
    it saves my back for when I need to use larger saws to get through paid jobs and make a few dollars.
     
  12. Whinbush

    Whinbush ArboristSite Operative

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    Sorry to hear your 361 is not so good, nothing as annoying as paying your money
    and not getting a decent product. Unfortunately a lot of the recent saws have had their
    issues, for whatever reason the older stuff was more dependable.
     
  13. holeycow

    holeycow Addicted to ArboristSite

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    There's a lot to be said for the "feel" of a tool.

    Powersaws are one of the tools that for me, "feel" matters. A lot.

    The homeowner or "farm" saws I have run just don't do it for me. My Echo CS590 is the "farmiest" saw I own. It just barely makes the grade. Just. Barely. So I enjoy using it as a reliable tool. If I want to grin, I run something else.

    I would buy an MS250. Used. Cheap. It would satisfy me like the Echo does. Like a decent tool, not a fun toy.
     
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  14. Chris Ross

    Chris Ross ArboristSite Lurker

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    Obviously most people use ms250 than ms261. The more people use a thing, the more complain they make.....
     
  15. Chris-PA

    Chris-PA Where the Wild Things Are

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    Clamshell engine design has nothing to do with the chassis - Echo made a clamshell in an alloy case (CS-510/520/530). Clamshell engines are inherently stronger than split case engines, as the crank is far better supported. They can be modded like any engine, with the exceptions being that it's harder to get tools inside due to the cylinder extensions, and reducing squish. Depending on the bearing & seal design that isn't always difficult, and I've done a couple.

    All transfers are fed from the case. Every Poulan clamshell has transfers that run straight up from the case. Many Echos have closed transfers. A clamshell cylinder can be cast with any port configuration that a conventional cylinder can, there is no difference from a manufacturing point of view. The inside shape of the case need not be any different.
     
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  16. Andyshine77

    Andyshine77 Tree Freak

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    We are talking how Stihl designs their clamshell saws, not all clamshell like designs, which is why I mentioned the husky. Many older saws like McCulloch used an all metal clamshell/block, totally different story than the little cap Stihl and some others use.
     
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