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My wood shed

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by sb47, Jul 13, 2018.

  1. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I started building a spot to stack and season my bagged wood stock and this is what I came up with. I wanted a place where I can easily store and rotate stock that would be easy to get to as it seasons. So I went down to a local fence company and asked if I could have some of the old used cedar fence panels that they had to get rid of and they gladly gave me all I wanted. There was lots of treated 4x4's 2x4's along with the panels.
    I used that old fencing to build a new fence along the back of my lot. I did have to buy some new 4x4's and some 2x4's but most of it is used fencing.
    I got some old used R panels to use as a roof to keep the rain off the wood.
    The cedar fencing was still solid wood, it just looks old and gray from weathering. I could have used new cedar but it would look old and weathered in a year anyways.
    It's 200 feet long by 3 feet wide and each bay is 10 foot long, so I can stack 2 rows of 14" wood in each bay. Yes I know the front row will season first, and that's ok with me. I can always pull one row at a time as I need it. As you can see I ran the R panels long ways in the first section that I did, because the R panels were 22 foot long and I didn't feel like cutting up all that R panel. The next section I ran the R panels the other way because I was working with shorter panels. It saved me a lot of wood by running them the other way. I'm still not finished because it got too hot, but as soon as it cools down I'll finish it.
    Anyway enough with the chit chat, lets see some pics!

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  2. MontanaResident

    MontanaResident Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Looks great! 200x3x10 is 6000 ft^3 or 46 cords of wood. *** Gasp ***

    In Texas??? I didn't even know there was that much wood to cut in the entire state.
     
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  3. sundance

    sundance ArboristSite Operative

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    The 200' and the 10' are duplicate dimensions. More like 200 x 2.3 (28") x maybe 7 or about 3200 cubic feet, about 25 cords. Still impressive.
     
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  4. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I don't expect to keep them all full all the time. It gives me room to stack different batches in different places and not cover up the existing dry wood. I have room to expand down the side fence line that's is 400 feet long and another section up front for another 200 feet. If I did the whole thing it would equal 800 feet.
     
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  5. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Most of it is for BBQ wood sales all year long. My bagged wood is by far the most popular with the campers, BBQ'ers and cookoff teams and even pizza oven cookers.
    It's the most popular and the most profitable. Guy's send there wives in there nice SUV or BMW and pick up wood without getting there car dirty.
     
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  6. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Your thinking of west Texas, east Texas is very green and full of wood. In fact the big thicket starts about 1/3 of Texas eastward.
    Most movies depicting Texas are actually shot in California, not Texas.
     
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  7. MNGuns

    MNGuns [INSERT COOL STUFF HERE]

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    Daaaaaaang.
     
  8. Marine5068

    Marine5068 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Looks good and makes a fence too.
    Only thing here is that the 4 feet of snow on the ground in our Winters that roof would collapse.
    I have some plans for a new lean-to style wood shed to make the Fall.
     
  9. MontanaResident

    MontanaResident Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I drove thru Texas once. Stopped for a bite in Amarillo, and all I remember is sand and weeds as far as the eye could see. Such a big state, no doubt it has all the topography the world can offer. Stil, dats alot o'wood.

     
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  10. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Get west of Austin and it gets very dry. East Texas is very green. Just look at all the green in my pics. There is a distinct line where you can see the topography change as you travel across this big state. We have the desert out west and mountains in the very far west. We have the hill country around Austin and San Antonio, the plains up north around Lubbock, we have areas around Buffalo that are mostly hard woods, and east Texas where we have pine country and the start of the big thicket. Then down south we have the gulf coast. It's a very diverse state. Roughly 900 miles from east to west and 700 miles from north to south. It's a big ass state!
     
  11. sundance

    sundance ArboristSite Operative

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    Not to be critical, but having grown up in the Rockies Texas does not have mountains! A big state with very varied terrain however and even some nice hills out west. I p*ss off folks around here when they talk about mountains and I ask if they could point out one real one nearby.
     
  12. sundance

    sundance ArboristSite Operative

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    Think a look around Miles City gives you a good sense of Montana?
     
  13. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Guadalupe Peak is 8,751 feet, I'd call that a mountain. We have mountains, there just not crammed together.
     
  14. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    That kinda looks like the texas hill country.
     
  15. MontanaResident

    MontanaResident Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Funny thing. I got the idea of moving to Montana about 30+ years ago after reading Lonesome Dove, by Larry McMurty. In the book, Miles City was the only named town in Montana, and I never once considered living anywhere in Montana east of the Bob Marshall Wilderness area.

     
  16. sundance

    sundance ArboristSite Operative

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    Reckon I'll concede y'all have a couple.....just not very big;)
     

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