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Never heard mention tamarack being used.

ChoppyChoppy

ChoppyChoppy

Addicted to ArboristSite
Joined
Jun 17, 2013
Messages
9,867
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37
Location
AK
I know it makes good lumber. Rot resistant.

Tamarack means "snowshoe wood".

For whatever reason, doesn't grow much around here in the wild. There are a few patches about ~80 miles north.
 
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Northerner

Northerner

ArboristSite Operative
Joined
Dec 13, 2010
Messages
215
Location
Alberta, Canada
It’s about all i have been using for last 5 years or so. About the best wood we have up here for firewood.
I do cut some boards as well, good for fencing, u just want to use them before completely dry or they warp and get tough to drive a nail through.
 
bfrazier

bfrazier

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Joined
Jun 23, 2018
Messages
235
Age
59
Location
Cottage Grove Lake, Oregon
When I worked and lived in Washington and Oregon in the Umatilla District I sold many truck loads of it. Burns nice a all around good practical wood. Thanks
We had some of it down in the Heppner Ranger District too Ted, but our western tree is different than the eastern varieties. I don't know which is better, or how they are different fuel wise, but there are probably members who have lived in both places who could say. Ours (Western Larch - Larix occidentalis) are a big sturdy tree, straight, tall, heavily buttressed and reportedly can live to 900+ years. I saw one seven feet thick when I worked there Blue Mountains of Eastern Oregon. Theirs (Tamarack, Larix laricina) is a much smaller tree, more like 24"DBH. I'm sure they are equally pretty in that time of the fall when they turn to gold - what a sight.
 
rustykfd

rustykfd

Amateur Arborist/Pro Saw User
Joined
Sep 22, 2018
Messages
19
Age
45
Location
SE WA
My grandfather had a log truck load delivered to the farm every few years. It was his favorite wood. Grandma cooked on wood until she couldn’t cook anymore(died). I grew up splitting wood at the farm, might have been a little spoiled considering how well Tamarack splits. My stepdad made me split Russian Olive and Locust. I liked grandpa better.


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