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New Guy

Discussion in 'Commercial Tree Care and Climbing' started by jzack605, Feb 3, 2019.

  1. jzack605

    jzack605 ArboristSite Member

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    What's up guys! New guy here. Starting a new job for one of the larger tree care companies the end of this month. I have been a licensed applicator for about five years now which they hired me for, and will also train me to be a climber. I've grown up working at nurseries and landscape contracting companies. Was wondering if anyone had any insight on what to expect, and tips.

    Very excited, wanted to get into tree work for awhile outside of just spraying/planting. Was going to see if a friend would train me to climb but I feel this is a better route.
     
  2. WmTreeCo.

    WmTreeCo. ArboristSite Lurker

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    Honestly, you'll likely get good at raking and chipping before you get much time in the trees.
     
  3. jzack605

    jzack605 ArboristSite Member

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    Yeah no surprise there, expecting that.
     
  4. The Singing Arborist

    The Singing Arborist ArboristSite Member

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    Welcome to the community. Before climbing, I did a lot of years in applications as well. Although apps were fun, and taught me a lot, there's nothing like climbing. Stick through the groundsman part to get up there. It's way better.

    Some tips to get you in a tree faster:

    Soak up what your crew lead has to say. Ask lots of questions. Take a little personal time to study how to prune, then ask your crew lead to do a little pruning on the easier jobs when you feel you're ready.

    Ask to learn some climbing knots, get your own climbing gear, and climb a few trees for recreation. Then once again, ask your crew lead if he will take you up and tag team an easy tree with you.

    Give it a few months before you try this out so that you have the groundsman duties down.
     
  5. Kiva’s tree service

    Kiva’s tree service ArboristSite Lurker

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    Welcome to the craft, you can start climbing trees for less than 200$ let me know if you want me to give you a gear list! Climb high and stay safe.
     
  6. jzack605

    jzack605 ArboristSite Member

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    Awesome advice, really appreciated.

    Would love to hear that gear list!
     
  7. Natster

    Natster ArboristSite Operative

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    Second on the gear list. I do a few trees. For fun.
    N
     
  8. nscoyote

    nscoyote ArboristSite Operative

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    less then $200 ? Helmet, Spurs, harness and lanyard and I'm already into the $1,000 range haven't started on my climbing ropes yet love to see what gear you have to start climbing for less then $200
     
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  9. jzack605

    jzack605 ArboristSite Member

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    I’m a little surprised but anxious to hear. A nursery I worked at in past sold some climbing gear and I remember the rope alone was a lot.

    I am expecting to get quite a bit of gear from the company themselves, though nothing climbing specific just yet but it should help.
     
  10. Kiva’s tree service

    Kiva’s tree service ArboristSite Lurker

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    To do some ascension and positioning practice all you need is a harness a rope and a lanyard
    Xygood harness on amazon 60$
    100 feet of 1/2 in blue ox rope 75$
    Lanyard made of of 12’ feet of your 100’ two double fishermen’s and a friction hitch made from gm 10mm rope (17$) and 1 carabiner trial lock by petzl 20$
    172$
     
  11. Kiva’s tree service

    Kiva’s tree service ArboristSite Lurker

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    I used basically this same equipment list for actually tree work for months. I had more biners and a hand and foot ascender but you could work a tree with just this. And a saw..
     
  12. jzack605

    jzack605 ArboristSite Member

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    Interesting. Well I’ll look into it. The nursery I mentioned should have most of that and they treat me like family; so anything I purchase is what they paid or less.
     
  13. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

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    Very solid advice so far. My 02 is to spend plenty of time to practice. Pick out some trees that are accessible then ask some one to go with you for spotting in that it takes some time to get acclimated to the endeavor. When you are asked to perform what your supervisor thinks is a easy peasy job you are ready. Thanks
     
  14. Robthetreemanct

    Robthetreemanct ArboristSite Member

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    Before you buy gear get in a tree. You either have it or you don't. That way if you look down and realize climbing isn't your thing you're not stuck with gear. And I can not stress enough if you plan on being a serious work climber buy GOOD gear from the start. Don't waste money just to upgrade everything in a year. Trust your gear. Free hanging out in space was strange for me at first. Been climbing almost 7 years now I'm a known high production climber in my area. Theres lots of money to be made if you get good. I do a ton of sub work and the occasional small side job besides running a crew Monday to Friday. Stick with it and the rewards can be good.

    Oh and really the number one thing is REC CLIMB REC CLIMB REC CLIMB. It will take you forever to advance if you only break out the saddle at work. Since you're new you will rarely see saddle time since on the clock it's all about production. Rec climbing on your own will get your body into shape and teach you how to move about a tree and position yourself. Pretend you're setting up to make cuts and that kinda stuff. Really study the tree and figure out the best way to route your climbing line/s. It will all become second nature as time goes on. Practice at home will show off at work. The faster you get good the more saddle time you'll end up getting at work where you can actually apply saws and rigging into your work. I'm a self made/taught climber who jumped in way over my head and had no choice but to learn fast. So these kinds of convos I can go on and on and on.
     
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  15. Haironyourchest

    Haironyourchest ArboristSite Operative

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  16. jzack605

    jzack605 ArboristSite Member

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    Thanks for the continued advice!

    Love that podcast by the way, educated climber.

    Jobs going great. Still just at groundie position as far as tree work goes, partly due to the corporate structure of moving toward climbing but now doing the PHC stuff so my chances to climb has definitely lessened. But a bunch of the guys I work with are really taking me under their wing to climb and a few plan on doing some after work training with me. They’d rather me do that with them with less production pressure.
     

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