ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


New Tree Where Stump was Pulled (not ground)?

Discussion in 'Homeowner Helper Forum' started by BelmontNC, Oct 8, 2019.

  1. BelmontNC

    BelmontNC New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Belmont, NC
    I recently had a tree (some kind of cherry I think) suddenly die (possibly root rot) over winter and this fall we cut it down and removed the stump (dug it out, pictures below/attached). I would like to plant a new tree (red maple) where the old one was, but I'm worried about nutrients and fungus. From what I've read, it seems that it's not ideal to plant a new tree in where the old one was, but we don't have a lot of room, we might be able to move it 5-10 feet in one direction, but I'm not sure if that's worth it.

    My questions are:

    1) Is it worth it to fill in the existing hole to move it 5 feet away?

    2) Whether we move it or not, how should I prepare the ground, compost, fungicide, fertilizer, etc.? And what kid of application rates should I use?

    Thanks for the advice, this will be the first tree I've planted, and I hope that it lasts for many years. IMG_7080.jpg IMG_7082.jpg IMG_7081.jpg
     
  2. buzz sawyer

    buzz sawyer Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2006
    Messages:
    5,250
    Likes Received:
    3,229
    Location:
    Western border of mid-southern northern WV
    Someone with more knowledge than I will have to advise on the dirt but what kind of tree are you considering? That looks pretty close to the house for anything but a small ornamental. Even so, I would move it out at least 5 feet or more. The old tree looks like maybe a Dogwood.
     
    CacaoBoy, BelmontNC and ATH like this.
  3. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    3,713
    Likes Received:
    2,460
    Location:
    Ohio
    I agree that is a little close to the house for a maple (unless it is a smaller species). Pick the "ideal spot" for where you would like to have a tree. yes...it may be a pain to fill a hole and dig a new one - but that is a couple of hours. The tree will be in the "right spot" for decades to come it you plant it correctly.

    Unless there was a specific root pathogen that killed the previous tree, you can plant into the same spot. Verticillium would be one example where you need to reconsider options. Once that has been identified, I just move to verticillium-resistant species if it is going to be anywhere near the same site. So even there, I have no worries about planting in the same hole if that is the best place. If it was verticillium, 5-10' away isn't far enough to protect the new tree.
     
  4. BelmontNC

    BelmontNC New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Belmont, NC

    I think you're correct about the distance to the house, I'm planing on a red maple (October glory) and I only have about 30 feet to the curb, so I am guessing I should plant 5-8 feet from the curb.
     
  5. buzz sawyer

    buzz sawyer Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2006
    Messages:
    5,250
    Likes Received:
    3,229
    Location:
    Western border of mid-southern northern WV
    Sounds good - as long as there is no chance for interference with power lines.
     
  6. BelmontNC

    BelmontNC New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Belmont, NC
    Certainly. We're lucky that they run along the back of our property.
     
  7. buzz sawyer

    buzz sawyer Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2006
    Messages:
    5,250
    Likes Received:
    3,229
    Location:
    Western border of mid-southern northern WV
    Same here, in fact, they ran mine underground and I'll never dig where they put them.
     
    BelmontNC likes this.

Share This Page