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OEM vs cheap aftermarket oil pump

Discussion in 'Chainsaw' started by Buzzaro, Nov 29, 2019.

  1. Buzzaro

    Buzzaro ArboristSite Lurker

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    So I’m having some issues with my saw oiling (357xp) and I’m considering replacing the pump to test if that’s the issue. The aftermarket knockoffs are all over amazon for $10-15 and the OEM are $35+. Anyone have experience with the aftermarket? Are they worth getting or am I better off to just pay and get the OEM? For $12 I might just replace it when I have the saw apart but for $35 I might mess with it a little to be sure that’s the issue.
    Thanks for the input
     
  2. Ozhoo

    Ozhoo Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Don't give up on your original one. Pull the filter from the tank and make sure that it's clear, then dump some diesel into the oil tank and piss rev the saw till you start seeing an improvement.
     
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  3. lostone

    lostone Stihl Runnin

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    What temps are you running the saw at, cold? are you running the right weight oil if it is cold? what does the manual say on the saw for the temps you are using it? In cold temps guys will cut the oil to thin it if using a heavy weight and not wanting to buy winter grade thinner weight oil.

    I have never used it but it's on the cheap side for winter oil, Walmart Do it Best winter bar oil.
     
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  4. Buzzaro

    Buzzaro ArboristSite Lurker

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    Pretty moderate temps, on the warmer side generally. Basically all seasons in Central Valley California. I use the bar oil the local saw shop sells. Something I’ll keep in mind but I don’t think that’s the issue here.
     
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  5. Buzzaro

    Buzzaro ArboristSite Lurker

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    I’ll give that a go. It’s looking to rain here for the next week so I need an indoor project anyhow. Is there a good way to test the pump independently from the rest of the oiling system, make it easier to see whether it’s the pump or a clogged delivery system?
     
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  6. lostone

    lostone Stihl Runnin

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    Sounds good, you only had yourself listed as US so I had no idea of what area and temps you may be dealing with.
     
  7. lostone

    lostone Stihl Runnin

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    Have you checked to see what shape the plastic pump gear is in?
     
  8. ammoaddict

    ammoaddict Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Have you ran it without the bar and chain to see if it is putting out any oil?

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
     
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  9. Huskitoter

    Huskitoter ArboristSite Operative

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    The pump would be hard to test because it pumps such a tiny amount per revolution.

    The seal between the rubber pieces and pump depends on the pressure from the plate. You can try putting a small piece of duct tape (or two) on the back of the plate over the pump to snug it all up.
     
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  10. Ozhoo

    Ozhoo Addicted to ArboristSite

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    It's rated for 20ml/minute @ 9000rpm... which in chainsaw lingo is a very high flow rate.
     
  11. Huntaholic

    Huntaholic ArboristSite Operative

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    I haven't bought a OEM pump in a long time. As cheap as the china ones are I can change a few before the cost is equal to oem. Pro tip: if you strip the pump pinion, go ahead and change the pump while youre in there. Some here are going to fuss and scold me for it, but as much oil as I use, I use used oil or cheap hydraulic oil most of the time in my saws. YES it may shorten pump life, but it does the job and 20 or 30 bucks a week saved on "chain oil" more than makes up for a pump and pinion every year or so. Its all about the bottom line in a business. If I only cut casually or for personal firewood Id use "chain oil". 4 machines, a log truck, pick up trucks, etc.... make for a lot of used oil so I make the most of it.
     
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  12. TheBrushSlasher

    TheBrushSlasher I have chainsaws and chainsaw accessories.

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    Some people have used a shop vacuum on the oil tank to clear out the lines with good results. You're probably not real far from me so the temps aren't cold enough to cause cold oil flow issues.
     
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  13. burnses

    burnses ArboristSite Guru

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    I have used a heavy rubber band round the clutch drum then to the chuck of a cordless drill to test the pump. Takes a minute to get he alignment right....only works on pro like clutch drum driven on pumps....

    good luck
     
  14. Kenskip1

    Kenskip1 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Yes I did. My Stihl 025 was not oiling properly. I went to Amazon and ordered the kit. It had a new oil pump,gas line,impulse line and gas filter.Anyway I changed the pump and it was oiling great. It was the high volume one.Well after about 30 minutes the chain was bone dry.Took the bar off, started it and zero oil. I checked the spring and the worm gear. Both were fine.Removed oil pump and you could hear it grinding inside. Spent $36 and put a new Stihl high volume pump in it.I now have good lubrication to the bar. To sum it up, don't take chances by being cheap with the oil pump.
     
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  15. Buzzaro

    Buzzaro ArboristSite Lurker

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    I think it may be the pump. The pump is pushing oil, just doesn’t seem to be much. I checked the lines and they’re clear. I spun the pump by hand using the clutch from with the pump and lines mounted to the unit, I could see it was moving some oil. I’ve also had the oil leak issue and looking at the unit while it was apart, I though maybe the backing plate wasn’t holding the lines that sandwich pump intake and output port tight enough. I gave it a little tap where I’ve got the screwdriver pointing in the photo to hold a little tighter and maybe solve both problems. Once I got the saw put back together and fired it up, it was oiling but not enough volume. I tried it again without the bar and chain to watch the oil port with a flashlight and same thing, put out oil but low volume. It seems like the next option is to try another pump. [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  16. SteveSr

    SteveSr Addicted to ArboristSite

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    That pump looks like a similar design to the Stihls. Those can collect crud in the pump and lead to poor oiling performance. The cure is to disassemble the pump and flush out the crud. What you want to remove is the main gear/piston. With Stihls you have to press out a roll pin. For yours you'll have to figure it out. Anything that was put together has to come apart. Just hope that the disassembly is non-destructive!

    You also need to flush/clean the tank (old mix is good for this) and run some carb cleaner through the tank vent to make sure that it is open.
     
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  17. Buzzaro

    Buzzaro ArboristSite Lurker

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    Cool thanks. Still a chance the pump might be ok and if the tank vent is plugged a new pump won’t change anything. I’ll check the tank vent first and if that’s not it I’ll try disassembling the pump and cleaning it. If the disassembly is destructive, I’m no worse off than I am right now anyhow.
     
  18. SteveSr

    SteveSr Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Looks like yours will come apart by removing (lowering) the eccentric adjustment shaft. Since there is no straight shot through the pump these are nearly impossible to flush while completely assembled.

    Also after removing the pump pull the oil pickup line and look for tears, holes, or deterioration. The pump cant pump oil if it is sucking air in the pickup hose.
     
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  19. Buzzaro

    Buzzaro ArboristSite Lurker

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    Taking the pump apart was pretty straightforward. Just need to remove the pin that holds the adjustment piece in place and everything slides apart. There didn’t seem to be anything gummed up or jammed in there. The hoses were still supple and free from cracks. Any idea where the tank vent is hiding? The cap doesn’t appear to be vented and I’m not seeing anything obvious. [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  20. SteveSr

    SteveSr Addicted to ArboristSite

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    The crud will be found hiding at the bottom of the piston bore. It doesn't take very much. It consists of sawdust in the tank that makes it through the pickup strainer but not all the way through the pump. Verify that you can see cast pump metal at the bottom of the plunger bore. Now that the pump is disassembled you can hit it with carb cleaner or WD-40. You may or may not see the crud as it is laving the pump at high velocity!

    As for the vent Stihl puts them in the bar side of the tank in between the bar studs. What is that round copper colored thing between the bar studs on your saw? Looks like a sintered vent. Can't tell if the sintered material is the vent or just the cover of the vent. Somebody who knows Husky's might be better able to help out. Try shooting some carb cleaner through it with the plastic straw and the oil cap off. See if any of it ends up in the oil tank. With Stihl you can usually hear it going into the tank.
     
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  21. SteveSr

    SteveSr Addicted to ArboristSite

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    The crud will be found hiding at the bottom of the piston bore. It doesn't take very much. It consists of sawdust in the tank that makes it through the pickup strainer but not all the way through the pump. Verify that you can see cast pump metal at the bottom of the plunger bore. Now that the pump is disassembled you can hit it with carb cleaner or WD-40. You may or may not see the crud as it is leaving the pump at high velocity!

    As for the vent Stihl puts them in the bar side of the tank in between the bar studs. What is that round copper colored thing between the bar studs on your saw? Looks like a sintered vent. Can't tell if the sintered material is the vent or just the cover of the vent. Somebody who knows Husky's might be better able to help out. Try shooting some carb cleaner through it with the plastic straw and the oil cap off. See if any of it ends up in the oil tank. With Stihl you can usually hear it going into the tank.
     
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