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OWB Hoss 400 - Manual or Help

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by PrivateParty, Jul 9, 2019.

  1. PrivateParty

    PrivateParty New Member

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    We bought a house that came with a fairly recent Hoss 400 (Not an HE unfortunately) that is the primary source of heat.

    I grew up with wood stoves and 70's air-tights often serving as the only heat source but I really don't know much of anything about OWB. I've got a thermostat on the wall which I would think handles the blower for the forced air in the house and I assume a pump for the boiler water. Is that about the size of it? Is there an electronically controlled damper/thermostat for the firebox? I saw some long louvers that looked like they might be dampers. I opened the door on the back and saw a handful of electronics but that's seriously as much as I've had time to do.

    I'm not even sure tennesseeoutdoorfurnace hands out a paper manual with these things and I certainly haven't found a PDF anywhere. If someone has one I'd love to see it.

    Otherwise, a few hard-fast rules might help. Do they run anti-freeze in these? Is there anything I absolutely should or should not do?

    Thanks
     
  2. NSMaple1

    NSMaple1 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    There are lots of variables with an install, outside of what a manual might cover. We can't see yours from here, to tell how they did some things. Pictures might help. Some (maybe most?) circulate the water 24/7, some only on demand - not sure we can tell that from pictures. Antifreeze would be an optional thing.

    Hard & fast? First would likely be, a very large amount of fairly dry wood ready to go - any ideas how much the prior owner used? Another might be regular (annual?) water testing & treatment to help prevent corrosion.

    Donts - don't load the thing plug full and let it smolder all day. Load for the heat demand.
     
  3. PrivateParty

    PrivateParty New Member

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    I went out and glanced at it this morning. What I thought were louvers is just a plate with some angle iron (or square tube) that covers the firebox. Looks like there's a pump and blower, a single control box that's plugged into the 110v, and a smaller box that I'm guessing is for temperature measurement; it has a small wire that disappears up into the top of the furnace. They built a shed around the thing (not the furnace's shed-like enclosure but a three sided building) but unfortunately it's so tight in the back that I can only open the rear door on the furnace a maybe 6-8" and I'm not sure how I'm going to get in there. I'm guessing I'll need to cut a door into the shed.

    So Antifreeze is optional since they figure you'll always have it running and it would cost quite a bit to treat a few hundred gallons? Do they figure leaving the pump run will save it in a freeze?

    There's a plug at the top on the same level as the outlet pipe, and one slightly lower than that. Is the slightly lower one supposed to be the fluid level?
     
  4. Powers1976

    Powers1976 New Member

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    I have a hoss 400. The temperature is controlled by your aqua star I set mine to 150. No it doesn’t use antifreeze. The plastic tube between the fittings is your sight glass. I like my stove it likes wood though
     
  5. Powers1976

    Powers1976 New Member

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    I have a hoss 400. The temp is controlled by an Aqua stat on the back. I set mine to 150 degrees. Heavy built stove only had an issue with a pump. The plastic between your fittings in the back is your water level. It doesn’t need antifreeze if your not burning wood in the winter just leave your pump circulating. The lever on the left side kills your blower fan to open the door
     
  6. PrivateParty

    PrivateParty New Member

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    I have not been able to get into the back very well yet. They put it up against the back wall of a little outbuilding. I've got framing, trim, and hinges in place but family came into town and I have a couple more cuts before I can open the 'new' door that'll then allow me to open the furnace door and get a good look.

    I haven't been able to make out any kind of sight-tube but it might be on the far side where I can't see it. I don't think I've seen the switch to kill the blower around; I'll have to find it. I've got two large tubes with cast iron caps screwed onto them, they must be at least 1.5" that I mentioned in the first post. They seem like sight plugs; does your stove have these? I gather all the hardware/electronics is just off the shelf stuff so I assume they might all be different, but does your have electronic water level monitoring? I guess if you have a sight-tube you can just open the door and look.

    I've got 20 cords sitting here now. I'd like to think that'll get me 2 years but yeah, I'm nervous about wood consumption.
     
  7. Powers1976

    Powers1976 New Member

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    Take pics
     
  8. bowtechmadman

    bowtechmadman Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Pictures would definitely help us answer some of the questions. I've burnt in an OWB for 18yrs so pretty familiar with "process" but have never seen a Hoss brand stove. I do not use anti-freeze and you are correct I rely on circulation to prevent freezing if I was to lose the fire for some reason. Some have anti-freeze you will have to test the water to determine if it has it or not and concentration. You are safe if you keep it circulating. Definitely need to determine how to fill and keep water full, and treated. I'd suggest dumping yearly, and refill along w/ water treatment if you determine there isn't anti-freeze.
    There is a great deal of info. needed to determine if 20 cords of dry wood will last 2 years.
    - how much sq. footage are you heating?
    - how much water does stove hold?
    - how well insulated is home?
    - how far from heat exchanger is the OWB?
    - what type of wood?
    - what type of PEX (water lines) how well insulated are they underground and how deep?
    If you are in GR Michigan there are several fairly local people that burn with OWB on this sight, anything I can do to help feel free to ask. You may also want to try ********** there may be more people familiar with this brand of boiler.
     

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