Welcome to ArboristSite.com! Log in or Sign up to interact with the ArboristSite community.

ArboristSite.com Sponsors
 
 


  1. Please see this post Click Here Please ask questions if you have them!! I hope this is going to be great for us all.
    Dismiss Notice

Preserving a Cedar

Discussion in 'Homeowner Helper Forum' started by Snorider, May 4, 2018.

  1. Snorider

    Snorider ArboristSite Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Messages:
    99
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    Seattle
    Hello folks, I had a 100' tall cedar tree taken down on my land for our new house. I was hoping to build something useful with the cedar at some point, but I have no idea what...or how at this point. Is there a way to preserve the tree for later milling? I cant imagine leaving it sit on the ground exposed to the elements would be very good for it. I was thinking of trying to lay it on some blocking underneath a carport thing but...thought I would ask. How quick do I need to get on this? Is the tree going to be ruined super quickly if not protected right away?
     
  2. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    3,142
    Likes Received:
    1,775
    Location:
    Ohio
    Paint the ends now. Anchor seal is the "ideal" for this, but you can use any old can of latex paint (put it on thick) to slow down how quickly moisture moves out of the ends. The get it up off of the ground. I'd be less concerned about covering it.

    Why not get it milled now?
     
    Snorider likes this.
  3. Snorider

    Snorider ArboristSite Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Messages:
    99
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    Seattle
    I don't know what to get it milled in to cause I don't know what I am going to do with it. Also...funds are pretty limited right now as we build the house.
     
  4. ValleyFirewood

    ValleyFirewood Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    8,339
    Likes Received:
    7,695
    Location:
    Palmer, AK
    We don't bother with sealing the ends. At worst there is 6-8" of "cull" at the end of the board, but it's about that from when it was cut with the buncher anyhow. I suppose maybe depends on the environment and the tree species?
     
    Snorider and ATH like this.
  5. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    3,142
    Likes Received:
    1,775
    Location:
    Ohio
    Certainly depends on both. I am not familiar enough with the western cedars... Seattle will have a higher RH, so checking will be less than if the same log were in NV, for example. However, it is cheap and simple enough - especially for 1 log, why not? just to be on the safe side.
     
    Snorider likes this.
  6. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    3,142
    Likes Received:
    1,775
    Location:
    Ohio
    The "common" thing would be getting it milled into 4/4 planks. However, if you think you want something thicker, that is obviously lost as soon as you do 4/4...
     
    Snorider likes this.
  7. jomoco

    jomoco Tree Freak

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2006
    Messages:
    12,445
    Likes Received:
    2,368
    Location:
    San Diego CA
    Sink it in your pond, like money in the bank!

    Jomoco
     
    ATH and ropensaddle like this.
  8. Snorider

    Snorider ArboristSite Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Messages:
    99
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    Seattle
    4/4 logs? How long do you guys think I could go letting it sit there?
     
  9. jomoco

    jomoco Tree Freak

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2006
    Messages:
    12,445
    Likes Received:
    2,368
    Location:
    San Diego CA
    Not long mate, bugs are prolly mackin on it now.

    Jomoco
     
    Snorider likes this.
  10. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Messages:
    3,142
    Likes Received:
    1,775
    Location:
    Ohio
    4/4 in the lumber world means four quarter (1" thick)...
     
    Snorider likes this.
  11. BC WetCoast

    BC WetCoast Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    2,876
    Likes Received:
    2,162
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Western red cedar can sit out for a long time. Totem poles carved from it last decades. I would keep it off the ground and lightly covered. Painting the ends is up to you, it will reduce checking on the ends.
     
    Snorider and grizz55chev like this.
  12. ValleyFirewood

    ValleyFirewood Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    8,339
    Likes Received:
    7,695
    Location:
    Palmer, AK
    Yeah, we bring in saw logs by the log truck load, so a bit different. Generally they stay 35-45ft tree length until ready to turn to lumber.

    Have some poplar we are going through now, for both firewood and saw logs that has been in decks since 2013. Still in good shape, which I'm surprised.
    Everyone says it'll rot in a year.
     
    Snorider likes this.
  13. Snorider

    Snorider ArboristSite Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Messages:
    99
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    Seattle
    35-45' is what I have. I have (I think) 4 logs. 2 of the logs are over 24" and the other two are 18". Ive been trying to get a value on it but...not as easy as it seems.
     
  14. BC WetCoast

    BC WetCoast Addicted to ArboristSite

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2007
    Messages:
    2,876
    Likes Received:
    2,162
    Location:
    Vancouver
    Value will depend primarily on the quantity and size of knots in your logs.
     
    Snorider likes this.

Share This Page