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Recommendation for a brush cutter blade.

John from Cle Elum

John from Cle Elum

At some point a decision will have to be made.
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Jun 9, 2014
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I spent last couple of days of my corona vacation cutting heavy vine maple with a Stihl brush cutter. I need a recommendation for a blade. I have been using carbide tipped 7" circular blades. The cutters are rectangular brazed on and look like something from a table saw. I have been sharpening with a powered diamond wheel intended for table saw blades. In use, they tend to throw the cutters, chip, don't cut particularly fast and the still require sharpening after about 5-6 tanks. I have also used a Stihl circular brush cutter blade. The kind you sharpen with a chainsaw file. These cut really fast when sharp but would not hold sharpness for more than a tank or two. It finally wore out after being sharped too many times and they are Stihl expensive.

I have been looking at the Forester brand blades on Amazon. The kind with a "chain saw" type cutter that you sharpen with a round file. They make both hardened steel and carbide tip versions.

Comments or recommendations? I still have about 6-7 acres left to do. At least 10 more days of work. Gotta work fast before it gets too dry and I have to stop work.

Thanks for any help.
John
 
John from Cle Elum

John from Cle Elum

At some point a decision will have to be made.
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It's rough, steep, and has various densities of undergrowth. Several neighbors have had a guy with a "mastigator" come in and shred all vegetation down the ground. The mastigator, love that name, is a cutting head on excavator. I would also have to remove a lot of trees before he even started. He was not willing to take my job on because it was too rough and too steep. Also charges a lot and I have more time than money.
 

ATH

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JTM

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I’ve been happy with the scarlet blade as well. Like ATH said, you have to keep the teeth set. I bought the tool for that. I wonder if you can get longer use out of the blade using a flat file though as opposed to the round. Guess I’ll find out.
 
John from Cle Elum

John from Cle Elum

At some point a decision will have to be made.
Joined
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Messages
101
Age
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Location
Washington State
Ended up purchasing the Forester blade. The Scarlet blade looked a lot the Stihl blade that I was not too happy with. Like cut fast when it was sharp but it got dull pretty quick. It is actually an 8" dia cutter. My memory is good, its just really short.
 

JTM

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I’d like to know what your experience is with that blade. I’m wondering if the wider kerf will be slower. Also, if you’re cutting small trees that are anything other than evergreens you might want to spray the cut stump.
 
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John from Cle Elum

John from Cle Elum

At some point a decision will have to be made.
Joined
Jun 9, 2014
Messages
101
Age
66
Location
Washington State
I will post my experience with the Forester blade. Unfortunately Amazon delivery has slowed down recently. It's still a week and a half out.
By the way, I looked at the Swedish website selling Strand hard steel blades and shipping was more than the blade about $40 for the blade and the same for shipping. Priced me out of that market.
 
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John from Cle Elum

John from Cle Elum

At some point a decision will have to be made.
Joined
Jun 9, 2014
Messages
101
Age
66
Location
Washington State
I used the Forester blade for about a day. This is the blade with the "chainsaw type" cutters riveted around the perimeter. Results: It cuts very well when sharp. The Forester blade needs a maintenance sharpening every two tanks of gas. It is easy to sharpen in the field with just a round chainsaw file. Also I had to grind a notch on the brush cutter guard to clear the thicker blade. As a comparison, the carbides cut well for an day or so. But the carbide tips need to get ground with a diamond wheel and a sharpening jig. I use a circular saw sharpener but it takes time. I have been cycling through the four blades that I own and those will need replacing soon. Some of the carbides have been knocked off or chipped. All told, I will stick with the carbide tip blades.
 
John from Cle Elum

John from Cle Elum

At some point a decision will have to be made.
Joined
Jun 9, 2014
Messages
101
Age
66
Location
Washington State
I guess I didn't specifically say, but yes I prefer the carbide tips because they stay sharp for a full day cutting 2" thick vine maple. The Forester Blade will be a backup. It is a good backup because you can sharpen it in the field with a chain saw file. No need to take it back to the shop.
 
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