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Root ball catapult...

Discussion in 'Arborist 101' started by MiloFrance, Jan 7, 2018.

  1. MiloFrance

    MiloFrance ArboristSite Lurker

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    Hi all
    A client had a 20m+ Chestnut blown over in Storm Eleanor here in the South of France, and I'm taking it away over the next day or two (weather permitting).

    To avoid this unpleasant situation, whats the best way to take the trunk out of play? Or is it a question of knowing it's going to fall back and controlling the situation as best as possible? Looking at the pic again, it may not fall back at all, but if anyone has any advice, it would be most welcome!

    IMG-20180104-WA0004.jpeg
     
  2. MiloFrance

    MiloFrance ArboristSite Lurker

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    OK I was searching maybe on the wrong phrase, found some other useful threads now...
     
  3. jwade

    jwade ArboristSite Operative

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    milo i am far from an expert but when faced with similar situations i have started at the top. as you whittle away at the canopy you can see the root ball start to lighten up and then use caution. a pole saw also helps giving you a little more margin of error. good luck and be careful friend.
     
  4. northmanlogging

    northmanlogging The gyppo's gyppo

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    Block up the root wad if you are concerned about it falling into a structure, the cut the root ball free of tge stem much like falling a real tree, leave the stump a few feet tall if you are concerned about it falling that way.

    Starting from the small end is all well and good, but takes for ever and sometimes you are left with a sketchy stub that stood up on its own
     
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  5. ATH

    ATH Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Well...if you have a big knuckle boom loader, there are safer ways to do that. I'd work my way down from the top. If you have that loader, hold the butt log down as you do that so it can't set up on you.

    But a guy too dumb to wear chaps, a hardhat, or safety glasses when cutting a big chunk like that probably isn't thinking ahead enough to make the situation safer with the other tools he has either!

    Not that I ever trust a fallen tree completely, but that pic you posted looks like the roots are pretty well rotted and not likely to have much spring in them...but you should still approach it as if they do.
     
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  6. BC WetCoast

    BC WetCoast Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I dont' think that stump is going to flop over. There isn't enough weight up high to bring it backwards. The stumps that fall back usually are the ones with large root wads and have a distinct pivot point.
     
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  7. Oldmaple

    Oldmaple Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Yes, like BC said it looks unlikely to flop back. Just being aware that it might at any time is a starter. I like to take the brush off then cut 4 or 5 feet from the base so you don't have this 20' pole flying back up. Just have to be aware it can, and position yourself accordingly. You'll know as you cut through if it is trying to stand up.
     
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  8. northmanlogging

    northmanlogging The gyppo's gyppo

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    chaps are overrated, if your not falling timber or working in timber where trees have been fell, a hard hat is pointless, safety glasses fog up, better off with a screen.
    but thats just me.

    You wanna run around looking like George Jetson go for it,
     
  9. MiloFrance

    MiloFrance ArboristSite Lurker

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    As predicted, it didn't move much. Sliced it at about 30° from vertical, the rest of the trunk settled an inch or so and the ball toppled not even 30° back. Now I have to get it out and redo the lawn...
     
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  10. BC WetCoast

    BC WetCoast Addicted to ArboristSite

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    If you work for a big company, you need hard hat, safety glasses whenever you are outside the truck on the job site. Some require chin straps even on the ground. Chaps/saw pants when using a saw - no brainer. (Without them, and you get cut, then your worker comp claim may be rejected.)

    Sincerely
    George Jetson
     
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  11. Drumhead

    Drumhead ArboristSite Lurker

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    The chaps, hardhat, and safety glasses are OSHA requirements. I don't know the French equivalent but I imagine it's similar. Steel toe boots and chin straps are contractor requirements as far as I know, which isn't much. I wear steel toe, safety glasses and hearing protection and don't own a pair of chaps. If I'm wearing the bucket most of the time I don't have the face guard down anyway.
     
  12. Wow

    Wow ArboristSite Operative

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    The one time I removed a glove and forgot to put it back on the back of my bare hand got cut when a limb fell dragging debris. A face screen shield saved my eye once and even with a face shield I've had a wood chip hit my eye ball. Often I've got a small quick easy job and that is when I'm most prone to neglect my safety gear. My ears are so sensitive it's impossible for me to use any machinery without hearing protection. Chaps help keep wood chips out of my steel toe boots. Only once have I nicked the toe of my boot. Before I owned chaps I cut my jeans up high on the thigh. Miraculously, not a scratch on the skin. That's when I bought chaps and so far not one nick. When I was a Firefighter safety gear was a must. Even now ,at times, I refer to my safety sawing gear as my Bunker Gear. It a pain to always stop and bunker out but if and when that gear is needed you'll be thankful you took the time to put it on. Accidents catch us by surprise. Today while pushing a shopping cart through a Hardware store and Sthil dealer, a pair of improperly stored hedge clippers fell between my fingers cutting me. The guys cleaned the wound and bandaged me up. Who wears gloves while shopping. Yet, now, I wish I were. Sometimes safety gear looks stupid but it's actually smart.
     
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  13. MiloFrance

    MiloFrance ArboristSite Lurker

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    It's the "it'll never happen to me" thinking. That's why they call them accidents. I'm guilty of not 'bunkering down' sometimes, and I usually give myself a good talking to when I leave bits off.
     
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  14. Wow

    Wow ArboristSite Operative

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    Inside every man is a boy. Mine is a wild excited fun loving teenager who loves machinery and pushing it to the limits. However my brain is 70 years old so he's the Father who must raise that Teen into a proper man. Hence all men are a Trinity, Father, Son, and Spirit which is the driving force which makes me seek knowledge and wisdom. All of us experience those things. That's how we debate ourselves. When wisdom wins, Father orders Son to bunker out. Good day.
     
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