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Scrounging firewood

LondonNeil

LondonNeil

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Always wear chainsaw boots, chainsaw trousers, chainsaw gloves, foresters helmet with visor and ear defenders, and after being educated las year....bolle safety specs too. And all I do is buck up logs the tree service drop. I've been considering completing the power ranger look with a chainsaw jacket....but not yet.

I like my 365xtorq ambull, the 372 is a solid saw. however i agree 60 and 70cc in a 2saw plan? no.
 
Ambull01

Ambull01

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I don't know how people do it. I do almost everything myself and I'm certainly not swimming in money. I can't imagine paying for everything to be done.

Both my grandfathers were very self sufficient. Neither was rich, but never lacked for anything. If they couldn't buy it with cash then they made do without. And if something broke they didn't run out to get a new one, they fixed it. Different times I guess.

[soapbox] People sure would do a lot less crying if they started doing a few things themselves and figured out how to get by with less. [/soapbox]
Ah yeah I always admired people that can make do with what they have. Sure new things specifically designed for the task is great but hillbilly ingenuity is awesome. Seems like a dying art form
Elastic chainsaw pants with suspenders!
lmao. Oh man that’s a great idea to make it rich. Read the majority of Americans are overweight. Cater to the ever expanding waist lines lol
You are lucky. I have always been a big eater and I also love to cook (and most people say I am a very good cook). I could not put on weight till college. Now it is easy, especially over the winter.

Guys do have it easier than gals though especially as we age. Gals frankly have more "places" to put the weight, often are less active, and seem to like sweets more than guys.

My ass is actually smaller than it was when I was younger...can't say the same about most women my age. Never had problems with pants falling down until the last couple of years.
Woah TMI about the ass stuff.
All of this is so true.....I honestly do not know how people do it yet manage to continue to get by.

IE lots of families around here making around 100K a year or more between two spouses....with a 300K mortgage, 50-80K tied up in vehicles, new boat, new ATV(s), snowmobiles etc. How do they do it? I mean I know how to do it short term but eventually payments catch up. And you are one bad event from financial catastophe.
Yeah isn’t that crazy? I read most Americans are one financial catastrophic event from being basically financially ruined. I wouldn’t be able to sleep at night if I was that financially stretched lol. Also most people have nothing saved for retirement. Crazy
 
Ambull01

Ambull01

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Always wear chainsaw boots, chainsaw trousers, chainsaw gloves, foresters helmet with visor and ear defenders, and after being educated las year....bolle safety specs too. And all I do is buck up logs the tree service drop. I've been considering completing the power ranger look with a chainsaw jacket....but not yet.

I like my 365xtorq ambull, the 372 is a solid saw. however i agree 60 and 70cc in a 2saw plan? no.
Oh you should complete the look. Go full dork or go home is my motto lol.
Yeah the 60 and 70cc is too close I think. 60 and 80 sounds better or a 60 and smaller lighter saw makes more sense
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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Kind of in a foul mood yesterday so didn’t do much except sharpen some chains and worked on my McCinderblock a bit. My dad died 21 years ago on Easter Saturday and despite my best efforts I just cannot enjoy myself on Easter. I always honor his legacy on the date that he passed (4/22) but no matter what I feel his loss on Easter Sunday. I thought after this long that it wouldn’t impact me but it still does.

I must have sharpened at least twelve chains yesterday and am now completely caught up with the 3/8” loops from the bucket of rocked chains I had saved up plus
a couple off of saws from the working fleet. I have not yet done the depth gauges on these as I prefer to hand file those so I can get the nice rounded edge on the leading edge which makes the chain cut smoother. Side note-I don’t rock many chains myself. These were mostly new to me chains that someone else had rocked.

I continue to learn the ropes of the new to me chain grinder from Philbert. I’ve become pretty good with the adjustment and not overheating the cutter when grinding back rocked cutters. Also dressing the wheel when it gets cruddy. I see why @Philbert cleans his chains prior to sharpening. For me the biggest thing is paying attention to how deep I cut as different brands of chain require different heights. Sometimes I feel like selling all of my chains except for full chisel Oregon so I can level set things.

I sharpened one Vanguard chain from the McCinder saw that I had used for a big stumping project at the park. Used the grinder to set the depth gauges and the saw cut very well. Never had a complaint with the cutting speed of Vanguard but adjusting THOSE depth gauges manually is a pain.

That saw hadn’t been oiling right and the bar adjustment was weird. Finally realized it was due to a homemade bar tensioner piece that must have been robbed from a different saw. It was binding when you tightened the bar nuts down and the bar oil was just running out along the side of the bar plates. Nabbed one from a parts saw and after cleaning the goop from the bar rails it seems to be oiling properly now. I’m planning on holding onto this saw for stumping purposes as despite its gangly appearance it’s got plenty of power and has that nice raspy McCulloch exhaust tone. Plus I only paid $30 for it.

View attachment 899326
Steve, I don’t always look at things the same way as others. We had two friends die on Christmas Day. Everyone said what a shame, so hard on the family. I said, “I’m sorry, but if I could pick the day I go, it would be Christmas or Easter. It would be like Gods gift to me.” To come home on one of Christian’s holy days. Maybe it’s been hard for you, but, maybe it was a joyous day for him? I’m sure he wouldn’t want you to blame the day. He died when you were young, I’m sure he didn’t want to. Let your soul rest easy, he would want you to be happy.
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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I always wear a hardhat with ear muffs and safety glasses. Almost always safety toed boots. I really should wear chaps or chainsaw pants but I don't.

I hate the way chaps feel and they are always getting caught on stuff. My waistline goes in and out so much that it is tough for me to buy "A" pair of expensive chainsaw pants because I might be 190 one year and might be 235 next year and back. Need to work on that. I know.

Btw, high revving ported saws really wreak havoc on your ears, if you get a high revving saw I would double up on ear muffs plus plugs. I had really bad tinnitus for a while when I was cutting a lot with ported 550 and 346.
When I was a kid, my Dad would say, “Do as I say, not as I do”. I tend to do the same. I tell people to wear there PPE, then buck firewood in a t shirt, shorts, krocs, glasses and ear muffs.
 

svk

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Steve, I don’t always look at things the same way as others. We had two friends die on Christmas Day. Everyone said what a shame, so hard on the family. I said, “I’m sorry, but if I could pick the day I go, it would be Christmas or Easter. It would be like Gods gift to me.” To come home on one of Christian’s holy days. Maybe it’s been hard for you, but, maybe it was a joyous day for him? I’m sure he wouldn’t want you to blame the day. He died when you were young, I’m sure he didn’t want to. Let your soul rest easy, he would want you to be happy.
Well I try not to let it bother me, but it does every year.
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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Ah yeah I always admired people that can make do with what they have. Sure new things specifically designed for the task is great but hillbilly ingenuity is awesome. Seems like a dying art form

lmao. Oh man that’s a great idea to make it rich. Read the majority of Americans are overweight. Cater to the ever expanding waist lines lol

Woah TMI about the ass stuff.

Yeah isn’t that crazy? I read most Americans are one financial catastrophic event from being basically financially ruined. I wouldn’t be able to sleep at night if I was that financially stretched lol. Also most people have nothing saved for retirement. Crazy
I worked my butt off till I was 59. When my company offered a 401 I got in it. When I could get an IRA I did. I have friends that have had Corvettes, S as in multiple Corvettes, off shore boats, big houses, 2-3 wives, and say I’m lucky because I have a retirement plan. If they had of given up the cars, boats, mansions and kept just one wife, they would have way more than me. A few of them couldn’t shake the drugs and didn’t make it to 59. I guess I’m lucky in that respect.
 
sean donato

sean donato

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All of this is so true.....I honestly do not know how people do it yet manage to continue to get by.

IE lots of families around here making around 100K a year or more between two spouses....with a 300K mortgage, 50-80K tied up in vehicles, new boat, new ATV(s), snowmobiles etc. How do they do it? I mean I know how to do it short term but eventually payments catch up. And you are one bad event from financial catastophe.
I took the "cheap" approach when we were looking for our house. At the time I was clearing close to 100k a year. I knew it wouldnt last forever. Paid 106k for our house, and just like I guessed, I had to find another job, making 32k a year. That sucked, especially when this covid crap hit. Found a new job, much better pay and less aggravation. I show up, do my job, go home, collect my check and fix my old junk. Our old fleet is starting to show its age and high mileage. Been having a lot of issues. If I had to pay someone to fix them we'd be flat broke, and living in a box under an over pass. Never know how people swing big payments, or how banks just throw money at people so they can have the new stuff.
 

muad

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Finally caught up. Hope y'all scroungers are well. Slammed at work, and been busy on the farm. Picked up four jersey bull calves on Sunday for cheap, gonna grow out three of them for beef and maybe keep one for breeding to our cows. Came from a local dairy with excellent genetics.

No scrounging, only wood I've cut lately has been apple and cherry for the smoker ;)
 
Ryan A

Ryan A

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Philadelphia,Pa
Just sent an email to the state park volunteer coordinator. trying to find a volunteer opportunity, hopefully something like trail maintainer or some type of forest management helper, that will allow me to use my new used chainsaw. told my wife and she said I'm obsessed with chainsaws lol. whoops. maybe there should be some secrets in marriages.
Nothings wasted if you’re learning something new everyday. Take the opportunity to learn about different saws, wrenching on them, engineering behind them, and two stroke theory if you really want to get cognitively engaged.

Processing wood is a great way to keep in shape and you could even make a little cash on the side selling small amounts. There’s also countless people looking for wood to heat their home who would love if you donated it to them (elderly, disabled vets).
 
Ambull01

Ambull01

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Nothings wasted if you’re learning something new everyday. Take the opportunity to learn about different saws, wrenching on them, engineering behind them, and two stroke theory if you really want to get cognitively engaged.

Processing wood is a great way to keep in shape and you could even make a little cash on the side selling small amounts. There’s also countless people looking for wood to heat their home who would love if you donated it to them (elderly, disabled vets).
Yeah very valid points/suggestions. I do like to take **** apart, the hard part is putting them back together lol.
Great idea about donating firewood to the less fortunate, sounds like a great cause and good excuse for the wife. Thumbs up
 
MustangMike

MustangMike

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Growing up in NY where the cost of stuff was always up there, I always worked a second job, usually doing taxes on the side because it was only 2.5 months/year mostly in the winter.

The downside was, for 2.5 months it is 7 days a week and every evening. You go into Tax Season like a Lion, and exit it like a Sheep, glad that it is over and you survived it again!

I figure my family lived better as a result, and I could buy a gun now and then, or parts for the car, and it did not come out of "house money".

In the early 80s when fuel oil went from 50cents to $1.50 a gallon overnight, I could not afford it, so I installed the 55 gal drum wood stove in the basement, bought a Homelite Super 2 chainsaw, and heated by wood. (My first FIL was a tree guy, and taught me how to safely use the saw and drop trees). Wood came home in the back of my 1980 Pinto Station wagon (aka the 4 speed go kart). The only accessory I could afford was an AM radio ... but I never complained. I was raised to figure out how to get it done and I did.

Now, with the pension, Soc Sec, and my Tax Practice life is kinda easy (financially), but I'm 68 and (in Tax Season) I still work 7 days a week, often long hours every day. I think next year my Daughter will come in with me in the Tax Practice, and I will cut back. Time to spend more time with the Grandkids, even when it is Tax Season.

FYI, my business is all by word of mouth, I have not advertised since 1983 (I used to run an add in the Pennysaver to get started). The last 2 years I have put "No New Clients" in my letter. There are only so many days in a week.
 
Ryan A

Ryan A

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Yeah very valid points/suggestions. I do like to take **** apart, the hard part is putting them back together lol.
Great idea about donating firewood to the less fortunate, sounds like a great cause and good excuse for the wife. Thumbs up
You’ll learn even if you can’t get something together. Failure is part of the learning curve too. I owe a lot to the members here from just reading posts and asking questions. Lots of good people and info here.

First pinched bar on this black locust.
Chipper was the one who walked me through through this failure.
I learned.

First pro saw, 266.Found out the hard way that bar nuts don’t need washers as the way the seller sold me the saw. Failure that I learned from.
ACB2D39D-8A69-4FC1-B487-2333CF6609DF.jpeg AAD49E9C-BCC9-4F6E-BB33-8A09AAF979A4.jpeg
 
Ambull01

Ambull01

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Growing up in NY where the cost of stuff was always up there, I always worked a second job, usually doing taxes on the side because it was only 2.5 months/year mostly in the winter.

The downside was, for 2.5 months it is 7 days a week and every evening. You go into Tax Season like a Lion, and exit it like a Sheep, glad that it is over and your survived it again!

I figure my family lived better as a result, and I could buy a gun now and then, or parts for the car, and it did not come out of "house money".

In the early 80s when fuel oil went from 50cents to $1.50 a gallon overnight, I could not afford it, so I installed the 55 gal drum wood stove in the basement, bought a Homelite Super 2 chainsaw, and heated by wood. (My first FIL was a tree guy, and taught me how to safely use the saw and drop trees). Wood came home in the back of my 1980 Pinto Station wagon (aka the 4 speed go kart). The only accessory I could afford was an AM radio ... but I never complained. I was raised to figure out how to get it done and I did.

Now, with the pension, Soc Sec, and my Tax Practice life is kinda easy (financially), but I'm 68 and (in Tax Season) I still work 7 days a week, often long hours every day. I think next year my Daughter will come in with me in the Tax Practice, and I will cut back. Time to spend more time with the Grandkids, even when it is Tax Season.

FYI, my business is all by word of mouth, I have not advertised since 1983 (I used to run an add in the Pennysaver to get started). The last 2 years I have put "No New Clients" in my letter. There are only so many days in a week.
Ah I forgot you were an accountant/ tax dude. Don’t you have a son that posts in here? Maybe I’m wrong though
 
Ambull01

Ambull01

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You’ll learn even if you can’t get something together. Failure is part of the learning curve too. I owe a lot to the members here from just reading posts and asking questions. Lots of good people and info here.

First pinched bar on this black locust.
Chipper was the one who walked me through through this failure.
I learned.

First pro saw, 266.Found out the hard way that bar nuts don’t need washers as the way the seller sold me the saw. Failure that I learned from.
View attachment 899427 View attachment 899429
Damn huge black locust! Haven’t seen one that big before. Also damn that’s a serious pinched bar! lol. Great idea to take the bar off, wouldn’t have thought of that actually. I had a few pinched bars, got them out with my Fiskars axe lol. Probably not a smart thing to do though. Also why it’s a good excuse to have multiple saws I guess. How the hell did you get the bar out?
 
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