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Scrounging firewood

svk

Saw Hoarder
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Oct 19, 2009
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26,658
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MN
I might lose one or two bar nuts a year.

But, Murphy’s law.....why allow something small and easily curable to derail your progress.

Be sure to put them in a larger container or they’ll find a way to get lost. Like in a quart ziplock. Maybe throw a wad of toilet paper and some band aids in there too.
 
Philbert

Philbert

Chainsaw Enthusiast
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Nov 25, 2006
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Minnesota
I shall stand corrected. I still don’t like em though.
That's fair. Now that you have a grinder, you may find sharpening them less of an issue, than with a file.

That is interesting info. I wonder if the first guy to test it had an epiphany like, "Hey! This chain doesn't kick back like the old chain." And thus the marketing of safety chain was born. Not that it's bad, in fact it's probably better for casual users like myself.
According to Oregon, it was something like that. Not necessarily the first guy, but based on feedback from companies using the chains.

Philbert
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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I have a Mac 610 that’s my dedicated stumping saw already. I’d rather torture that through long cuts rather than one of my good saws. It’s easier to have it ready to go with a stumping chain than have to swap chains at the end of the day.

I found some NOS Mac pattern hard nose bars for sale and was thinking about adding a bit more reach.
What size bars, I'm gonna need one for my Mac 7-10, if I ever get it back together?
 
rarefish383

rarefish383

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My bad, shouldn't have set the course of total thread derailment lol. I guess no politics, religion, or COVID.

I'm hoping the state park and/or charity rep responds soon. Trying to volunteer at some state parks near me as a trail maintainer. Figured that would give me an opportunity to run the chainsaw and/or swing an axe. Also found a charity near me in VA that donates firewood to the less fortunate. They're looking for volunteers to help split, stack, and cut. Sounds like a great cause so I'm trying to get involved with that. Maybe I could also use my new used truck to help transport the firewood.

What you guys bring if you were during trail maintenance/scrounging where you had to hump all your gear on your back? Chainsaw, spare chain, tool to take off the bar, maybe an axe, fuel mix, bar oil, protective gear, maybe some wedges. And how would you guys carry all this crap? Maybe a hiker style backpack?
A mule.
 

svk

Saw Hoarder
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Messages
26,658
Location
MN
I passed on it . Very nice truck guy truck was his gramps who used it on his property ,was asking 14k . Plus side low miles super clean ran great everything worked Cons to nice to destroy using it as a truck , a bare bones truck no options ,would cost to much to convert to a single wheel pickup .And since its coverted it would deminish its value as opposed to a nice 1 ton original . And the title was filled out to him and he never transferred it. So I'd have to wait for a new title in his name
I can understand that. Beautiful vehicle but a lot of coin to tie up into a 40 year old piece of equipment that is going to be expected to work.
 
old CB

old CB

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CO
Just curious--am I the only one here who once owned a mule? Blondie--she hated me, loved my wife. A friend convinced me that a mule would be the best draft animal (draft horses had been the thing where I lived, and a bunch of people still used them, and this was pre-Amish). I had numerous mis-adventures with that beast. Owned her for a year, then sold her and bought a Farmall C tractor (wide front end). One of my earliest smart business decisions.
 
old CB

old CB

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Oh, what misadventures you might ask?

I knew she was skittish, but that didn't deter me from trying to work her in odd ways. Old car hoods--from roughly late-40's cars--were good for a winter utility sled. The front end turned down, so upside down they worked great in the snow. I found one and felt pleased at my good fortune.

As a "poor boy" with limited tools, I put a hole in the front of my car hood to draw a log chain through for pulling, 12 Gauge hole. I took a round of wood and nailed it to the upside (once the inside) of the hood for a seat. I intended to go for a ride.

I had proper harness and put it on Blondie, backed her to my car hood, and hooked the log chain to her single-tree. Sat down on the car hood and rattled the lines to her bridle. BTW, a bridle for a draft animal has blinders. So when we started moving forward Blondie could not see and had no idea what it was that was scraping along immediately behind her. The snow was kinda crusty. She was skittish.

She took off like Beelzabub was tied to her tail. I steered her into the back meadow. Thought I would tire her, wear her down till she got used to the load. No such luck. She was racing full gallop, and at one point centrifigal force had me and the car hood sliding toward 4 strands of barbed wire with velocity. I rolled off the inside rather than chance that encounter.

Later I detangled harness, barb wire, chain, etc. and led Blondie back to the barn. No blood shed, so it could've been worse.
 

svk

Saw Hoarder
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Oct 19, 2009
Messages
26,658
Location
MN
I ordered a 24” sprocket nose Upstart bar from Amazon for my stumping saw. After tax, shipping and adding a gift card, the bar cost me $11.

Last fall I inventoried all of my chains so not counting the few I’ve scrounged over the winter (trying to keep them in a separate pile) I checked the list and noticed I had 4 chains in that DL count including one loop of skip so I’m good to go.
 

svk

Saw Hoarder
Joined
Oct 19, 2009
Messages
26,658
Location
MN
Got a stupid question. How is a stumping saw different from any other saw? What is stumping anyway? lol
Flush cutting stumps off at the ground.

Because the cut is right above ground level there’s often dirt/rocks/grit or other nastiness in the wood to assault your chain. Additionally, because the roots are growing outward, you aren’t cutting strait grain, rather diagonally through the grain which takes more energy and creates uneven chips or sometimes powder. Also, the bar will often end up buried in the wood, after it’s pulled dirt into the channel. So you end up finishing the second half of the cut with a pretty dull chain. Or you have to stop and sharpen. It’s hard on saws.

I would personally rather use an older, low value saw to do stumping and leave my nicely cared for, ported saws for the better work.
 
mountainguyed67

mountainguyed67

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Making progress. I’ve probably got 2/3 of the tree tops burned and 1/3 of loose limbs burned.

My sore shoulder isn’t hindering me but I’m a bit tired today.
View attachment 900290

Oh, we’re not supposed to burn green, the permit specifies a number of days you need to wait.
 
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