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  1. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    My point is, wood is not always consistent, even within the same tree. The ratio of wood fiber, air, moisture and pitch is not consistent in every piece of wood. Sap wood vs heartwood, not the same.
     
  2. ChoppyChoppy

    ChoppyChoppy Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Interesting setup. Seems like alot of extra work dealing with 8ft logs, though I suppose makes for a tighter load on the truck. We handle and haul logs in tree length.
     
  3. sundance

    sundance ArboristSite Operative

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    I'd love to see a picture of those 40 to 50 foot tall stacks.
     
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  4. CaseyForrest

    CaseyForrest I am NOT a tree freak.

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    Here in MI the max plate sticker is 160,000. But they still have to abide by axle ratings which is why there are so many tag axles.

    Our roads suck though.
     
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  5. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Weight ratings protect roadways but it's the bridge weights that are more important. Most truckers are not gonna move there axles just to cross a bridge.
     
  6. CaseyForrest

    CaseyForrest I am NOT a tree freak.

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    Our bridges suck too.

    The roads and their supporting infrastructure here really are in horrible condition.

    sent from a field
     
  7. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

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    I very much agree wood is never the same. I cut some Pine a few years ago and thought the wood was some what heavy. After three years it still seemed heavy so took some samples and it burned fine, but was much heavier than the rest. After some years handling wood fewer surprises come about. Thanks
     
  8. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

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    I have not delivered to Newport Beach in several years and I am sure the owner has since passed away, but I have a new camera so maybe I could click a few. I know a guy in a close by community that stacks pretty high too. For me I go 20' high, but now and then a stack falls over. It is no fun to restack a pile that you spent all day putting up. Thanks
     
  9. chucker

    chucker Addicted to ArboristSite

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    "SEASONED", this word can be interpreted in many ways to time and flavor ! seasoned, as in as little as 3 month's or as lightly salted and peppered to taste.. ??? now for a better choice of a word "AGED" wood, settle in as a better statement for "QUALITY"...…..
     
  10. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    How are you defining "AGED"
     
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  11. chucker

    chucker Addicted to ArboristSite

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    aged as in older then dirt!! lol
    aged as in dusty and dry! aged as in "seasoned like a well aged bottle of whisky" …..
     
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  12. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    To me the word "seasoned" means at least as old as one season of the year.
    Aged could mean anything form a day old to infinity.
     
  13. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

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    I cut a Pine tree that was interfering with a power line 3 weeks ago. It had pitch dripping around the edge. The customer did not like the hack job that the power company did so he asked if I had time, because he wanted it gone. It is now aged seasoned and ready to burn because I burnt some yesterday. There is no difference to some I cut last spring. Oak will take up to 3 months to be fully ready to burn remember this is not our rainy season. We do not have issues with seasoned aged or dry wood here, no we have fires that devourers hundreds of square miles of landscape if left unattended. Thanks
     
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  14. chucker

    chucker Addicted to ArboristSite

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    like an aged steak rare to medium well done... yum-yum ...
     
  15. chucker

    chucker Addicted to ArboristSite

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    ?? I wonder?? "seasoned wood", I wonder if Barbecued Wood is seasoned or seasoned ?? ?? seasoned in taste or seasoned in age ?? I wonder?? ! BBQ WOOD??! LOL now this is puzzling.
     
  16. sb47

    sb47 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I season my wood with "Time"
     
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  17. Sandhill Crane

    Sandhill Crane AS Member

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    Sold some year old Oak firewood today to a guy who bought a rather nice smoker from Oklahoma. I guess he used to live down that way for a number of years. Saw pictures. Work of art on wheels with a trailer hitch. Lots of stainless steel. Guess the firewood is seasoned enough.
     
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  18. MNGuns

    MNGuns [INSERT COOL STUFF HERE]

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    Every buyers is different. I've had the dont cares and the must be perfect both. Throw an honest ad out there and see what bites. :)
     
  19. Sandhill Crane

    Sandhill Crane AS Member

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    Seems odd quoting myself, but I misspoke.

    The smoker is from Tuscaloosa, AL and this guys website is worth passing on and checking out.
    shirleyfabrication.com
     
  20. muddstopper

    muddstopper Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I just use my personal judgement as to if the wood is properly season. I just cut and burn for myself, so I aint trying to satisfy anybody else. I try to only burn wood that has been cut and split for at least a year. I store the wood in the dry so it doesnt get rained on. My firewood may lay in log form for a year before splitting and then stacked in the shed a year before burning. I dont really stick to any one method of choosing which wood to burn. If its wood, it burns. Sometimes when I load the wagon for the stove, I might stop at the wood pile and throw on a few sticks that are laying in the way of my mower. Those sticks may or maynot be completely dry, but they are in the way so I burn them. Some wood just dries faster than other woods. I have a bunch of Bradford Pear that will be rotten if left in a plie for a year. Got some big white oak that has been laying on the ground for almost two years, Mushrooms growing on it, I bet if split it would be sopping wet inside. Got a few Maple logs a couple months ago, not big stuff, and looks to be drying in log form. certainly not dry wood, but once split should be ready to burn this winter. Anyways, I basicly burn what I have, not always what I want. If I need a fire, even green wood will do. Any wood laying on the bare soil will always be wet and wont burnworth a hoot. Stack it inside by the stove for a few days and it will burn like tinder.
     

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