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Sharpening, finally at long long last

Discussion in 'Homeowner Helper Forum' started by husky46cc, Jul 28, 2018.

  1. husky46cc

    husky46cc ArboristSite Member

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    If you're a seasoned pro at sharpening, feel free to stop here. If not, maybe this'll be of some help. Today I bought 2 of the "Two In One" sharpeners made by Stihl. Unlike every thing I'd tried, these devices worked with consistency. First up, I sharpened the old chain on my Stihl MS 180c, then did the same on my Husky 445. Both chains were restored to factory fresh condition, if not better. Both saws tossed out big chips. No sawdust or grits. Both saws cut aggressively and straight. Over the past several years, I had tried Stihl's sharpening kit; Husqvarna's kit; a Granberg file and joint; and a Craftsman dremel type sharpener. Bottom line, the Stihl 2 in one is a superior product. With it, a gorilla could sharpen a chain - consistently and fast. I paid about $40.00 for each device. They came with 2 Stihl files. So about $33.00 net. Worth many times that to me, just in reduced frustration!
     
  2. Marine5068

    Marine5068 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I'll look it up for sure.
     
  3. BushWackin

    BushWackin ArboristSite Lurker

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    I have one for every chain size I own. I try to touch up the chain every tank or two. It gives me a break and keeps the saw running well. The more I use them the less I rotate my bar. Just make sure you still rotate regularly and keep the saw clean.
     
  4. Ted Jenkins

    Ted Jenkins Firewood by TJ

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    I am probably considered a long time pro more than most. I have been around the block in several states making a living at running my chainsaws. Does it mean that I know everything at least not in my opinion. I never had a jig or guide when I first got a chainsaw, So I got a file and whittled away at the chain. Yes it made some chips. Over the years my finesse improved greatly as will yours. When I am in soft wood like Pine I go big then when I am dirty Oak I go very small. It seems to me that anybody that can make a chain sharp out in the field has a big advantage over those who rely on just their grinder at home. So if you can make a good grade of chips with a guide I say it will not be long if you continue to have the ability to free hand very well. Or a combination of grinders and hand filing is not all bad, but when some one can fix a rocked out chain or touch up and be on their way is a commendable skill. Thanks
     
  5. old CB

    old CB ArboristSite Operative

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    Since picking up a saw in the '70s, I used a Granberg File n Joint for many years. Then I learned to file freehand. Then I bought a used grinder which I thought would make sharpening quick and easy. Haven't used the grinder in forever, as it just won't do as good a job as a file.

    A couple years ago I was introduced to the Stihl Two-in-One. It's all I use anymore. Sure, I can hand-file in the field if I have to. But this thing makes sharpening a breeze--anyone can put a great edge on a chain--AND get the rakers right at the same time.

    I have one for my 3/8 chains and one for my .325 chains. It's a great tool.
     
  6. old CB

    old CB ArboristSite Operative

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    Also, Pferd makes the same outfit--you can get it from Bailey's. The Pferd uses a 7/32 file for a 3/8 chain, while the Stihl model uses 13/64". I can't tell the difference in chain performance between the two, but I like the 7/32 file for a new chain, and go to the 13/64 when the cutters are short.
     
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