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Some WTF pics.....

Stihl 041S

Stihl 041S

Tree Freak
Joined
Dec 9, 2006
Messages
14,488
Age
68
Location
Quaker Valley
No, increasing the height of a building changes nothing, ON AVERAGE. Where you might have more light capture on the east side in the morning, you have darkness after noon. That morning light capture comes at the expense of the neighbor's building getting no light at all.

Let us consider that dinky building relying on sunlight to penetrate it's multi-story structure to capture photosynthesis, as shown in the original picture. If it has no neighbors of similar height, then it is only stealing its neighbor's sunlight. Surround it with other buildings like itself, and it cannot get any rays except on the roof. I do not believe that isolated buildings of great height offer any agricultural efficiency advantage over plain old flat ground except where sunlight will be supplemented with artificial light. And all known artificial light comes with a huge energy expense greater than the lumens of light produced.

As to more light by increasing the height? Assume a large area, rather than one tiny building in one little spot. Imagine, if you can, a square mile of field. Then tell me that more sunlight falls upon that field when it occurs at a higher altitude.
They grow on the sides......
 
pdqdl

pdqdl

Old enough to know better.
Joined
Feb 26, 2008
Messages
16,148
Location
Kansas City
Sadly, this just seems to be another case where the quote just ain't so.

"Currently, there is no substantive evidence that Mark Twain wrote or said a version of this expression. He was connected to the saying decades after his death."
https://quoteinvestigator.com/2013/10/26/kindness-see/

"The earliest instance located by QI appeared in February 1861 within a New York newspaper column titled “Wit and Wisdom: Original and Selected”​

Considering that Samuel Clemens was a steamboat pilot until 1861, it is most unlikely that he originated the statement.
 
pdqdl

pdqdl

Old enough to know better.
Joined
Feb 26, 2008
Messages
16,148
Location
Kansas City
That is really deceiving. Comparing peak to average. Corn only lives for about 4 months and probably only near its peak for a couple of weeks. We have the old saying around here, "the corn should be knee high by July".
That whole graphic is very much a misleading piece of information. Maize is a very high producer of oxygen, but that tidbit of information is unrelated to the image shown. The graphic image is only showing "fluorescent" light as a consequence of photosynthesis. What isn't explained or evaluated is that no comparison has been shown in this article as to how much relative "fluorescent" light is produced by different types of vegetation. A careful look at the video also shows that they are showing similar light flares where corn is never grown.


I think that it is quite likely that the measured "fluorescent" light from a corn field is more easily seen from a satellite than from a rain forest.
This seems like a propagandist's excellent plan to justify extensive farming efforts. They never even explained what they meant by "fluorescent" light. Light doesn't have any fluorescent attributes. It just has frequency and amplitude.

It doesn't sound like good science to me.

Here is some true WTF science for you:

"The efficiency of photochemical quenching (which is a proxy of the efficiency of PSII} can be estimated by comparing F m {\displaystyle \,F_{m}}
to the steady yield of fluorescence in the light F t {\displaystyle \,F_{t}}
and the yield of fluorescence in the absence of photosynthetic light F 0 {\displaystyle \,F_{0}}
. The efficiency of non-photochemical quenching is altered by various internal and external factors. Alterations in heat dissipation mean changes in F m {\displaystyle \,F_{m}}
. Heat dissipation cannot be totally stopped, so the yield of chlorophyll fluorescence in the absence of non-photochemical quenching cannot be measured."
Fundamentally then, it is impossible to accurately measure photosynthesis from a satellite.
 
pdqdl

pdqdl

Old enough to know better.
Joined
Feb 26, 2008
Messages
16,148
Location
Kansas City

Rodin's "Thinker".

When my brother saw that famous statue going into the Nelson Art Gallery, he quipped "He must be thinking of where he left his clothes".

The busload of kids reportedly erupted in laughter. I wasn't there, but I heard about it.



This is a fantastic sculpture when viewed in it's original setting. Not so impressive when cast alone in a parking lot.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thinker

Also: here.

The Nelson-Atkins is located at 45th and Oak Streets, Kansas City, MO. Hours are Wednesday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Thursday/Friday, 10 a.m.–9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Sunday, Noon–5 p.m. Admission to the Museum is free to everyone.
 
pdqdl

pdqdl

Old enough to know better.
Joined
Feb 26, 2008
Messages
16,148
Location
Kansas City
The person who did this layout needs to be shot.
I will bet you a dollar that @pdqdl knows where this is. If not, I will bet double or nothing that he can find it.
What's my cut on all this gambling?
At this point, I can even tell you the owners name for any house in the picture. The land values and property tax valuations are very high! Best to bring a fat wallet if you wish to live here.

30°16'50.4"N 81°23'35.1"W

Jacksonville Beach, FL 32250

That odd square of streets seems to be exactly 160 acres, 1/4 mile on each side. It is also oriented straight north & south. It is only about 7 blocks from the original site of Ruby post office, some time back prior to 1900. My guess is that is the shape of the original "quarter section" of land purchased by the developer, and then he put streets down to match his property outline. The rest of town seems to follow the beach contour.
 
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