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Splitting/Chopping Tool Review Thread

Discussion in 'Firewood, Heating and Wood Burning Equipment' started by spike60, Nov 19, 2014.

  1. Lowhog

    Lowhog ArboristSite Guru

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    Factory razor sharp. I think it cost me 214.00 or 224.00 with free shipping. DSCN5130.JPG
     
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  2. Multifaceted

    Multifaceted Firewood Hoarder, Axe Junkie

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    She's a beaut! What length haft did you select?

    My only gripe with this axe is what seems to be a thin bit profile and hollow grind typical of other Gransfors axes. Nothing wrong with it, just seems better suited for soft woods. An efficient hardwood axe has some cheeks to it!
     
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  3. Lowhog

    Lowhog ArboristSite Guru

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    A bit more beef in the cheek area vs the smaller Scandinavian forest axe. These were made for American hardwoods. 31 inch haft. DSCN5132.JPG
     
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  4. Lowhog

    Lowhog ArboristSite Guru

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    Check this out The gransfors left, the paper thin Snow & Nealley Hudson Bay center, The Wetterlings outdoor axe on the right. Weterlings built more for general chopping and splitting with its thick cheeks. DSCN5134.JPG
     
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  5. Multifaceted

    Multifaceted Firewood Hoarder, Axe Junkie

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    Still a little on the thin side, but considerably less so than their smaller native axes. I prefer the profile of Wetterlings, they have some meat on the cheeks.

    I hear the name "American Felling Axe" and think hardwoods too, but here it is right from their own source:

    The Gränsfors American Felling Axe is a professional axe for those who want to work in the forest in the traditional way. The axe is ideal for felling very large trees, thanks to its long, broad edge of 11.5 cm. The axe is forged to a curved bit, making it suitable for cutting into fresh, resinous wood such as spruce or pine. The heavy head and long handle also give considerable power to the cut. The axe is almost twice as heavy as the Scandinavian Forest Axe.
    Source: https://www.gransforsbruk.com/en/product/gransfors-american-felling-axe/

    Perhaps that is in reference to the curved bit. I just know from experience that thinner bits don't chop very well in woods such as oak, hickory, or ash. They seem prone to biting deep and getting stuck, rather than separating the fibers and throwing chips.

     
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  6. Lowhog

    Lowhog ArboristSite Guru

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    I gue
     
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  7. Multifaceted

    Multifaceted Firewood Hoarder, Axe Junkie

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    No argument there. That certainly can be the case sometimes, which is why there were innovations like the phantom bevels we see on axes such as the aforementioned Kelly Perfect Jersey. However, a distinct difference between American and Swedish axes are the cheeks found on American patterns. Too wide, like a maul as an extreme example, and it'll get stuck if it bites. Too thin and it can bite too deep, and the lack of girth won't separate the chop enough. Anecdotal, I know.... won't you let us know how it performs otherwise?

    Ha ha, I'm far from the size of a gorilla, but I learned to swing an axe in the same manner as swinging a bat – it's all in the wrist and arc of the swing. That way is more efficient in chopping as well as conserving energy.
     
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  8. svk

    svk A little bit of everything

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    Good info. I always (wrongly) assumed that thinner was better. I mean it works great up here in softwood country but I understand you wouldn’t want that in hardwood
     
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  9. Lowhog

    Lowhog ArboristSite Guru

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    J
    Just watched a Gransfors American felling axe video in large oak and the axe worked perfectly never got stuck. So I don't buy into they are no good in hardwood. Plenty are being used all over this Country in hardwoods. Its all in the swing let the weight of the axe do the work.
     
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  10. Multifaceted

    Multifaceted Firewood Hoarder, Axe Junkie

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    I suppose it really depends on what you're chopping. Limbing branches or bucking small diameter trees? Sure, a thin bit will perform well enough on hardwoods. Notching a large oak tree to fell, or bucking large diameter hardwood logs... well, you're a glutton for punishment... Just saying...

    What's most important for any axe user in my opinion, is to actually use it. The particulars don't matter much after that in this modern age of power saws and equipment.
     
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  11. Multifaceted

    Multifaceted Firewood Hoarder, Axe Junkie

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    Anecdotal, just like my opinion. Use the axe yourself and let us know!
     
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  12. Lowhog

    Lowhog ArboristSite Guru

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    6 weeks we should be settled in down in Hickory country. I'll give it its first hardwood workout down there. I love smoking meet with Hickory.
     
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  13. Lowhog

    Lowhog ArboristSite Guru

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    Never noticed that S&N Hudson bay being so paper thin till I held it up with the others. I can see that getting buried (Stuck). I bet it would be good for clearing a trail in brush. My wetterlings Hudson bay is very thick.
     
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  14. svk

    svk A little bit of everything

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    Wow you moved quickly. Remind me where you are relocating to?
     
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  15. Multifaceted

    Multifaceted Firewood Hoarder, Axe Junkie

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    Hopefully it'll cool off some too. Our forebearers who swung axes for timber in the dog days of summer were harder men than I (and probably smellier) - any time I bust out an axe for work in the heat, I'm soaking wet in minutes, my calloused hands are peeling and I'm fighting to keep the haft in my slippery grip. Did I mention that I hate the summer?

    This might sound pansie, but I like to wrap a little sports tape around my thumb near the crease to ease the rubbing. Otherwise you'll get a blister and sore where there is no callus. I don't like using gloves when swinging an axe, but that area on my thumb always gets worn raw with extended use...
     
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  16. Lowhog

    Lowhog ArboristSite Guru

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    I try to limit my carbon footprint in this world but when I compare myself to a millionaire that puts 10,000 gallons of diesel fuel in his yacht once a month I don't feel bad using a chainsaw or power log splitter.
     
  17. svk

    svk A little bit of everything

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    My hands are terrible right now. On my left hand my aunts cat laid me open (he’s a snakey *****) and three of the four canines punctured, then I got a blister from using the rubberized handle on a scissor jack to change a tire in 85 degree heat, finally I got a bad sliver that I didn’t notice until it was infected. And I’ve done three cords of wood in that time and cut a couple more.

    The worst was when a wood chip fell into my glove and stuck into the popped blister. Yeow!!!!

    My other hand is a little better but when I was working on the truck yesterday I had some rust shards get under my watch band and chaffed the hell out of my wrist.
     
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  18. Lowhog

    Lowhog ArboristSite Guru

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    Southern Appalachian mountains.
     
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  19. Lowhog

    Lowhog ArboristSite Guru

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    Tired of this damn heat ,bugs,and Canadian fire smoke. Its so bad I can't breed.
     
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  20. Multifaceted

    Multifaceted Firewood Hoarder, Axe Junkie

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    Environmental stewardship is a good thing. No qualms from me, I love my chsinsaws and use them regularly. I also drive A LOT but limit myself to a 4 cyl manual because of gas consumption and a very long work commute. I enjoy using axes because it's the old way, nothing else. While I'm certainly a collector, I'm a user first. It's fun, and it's good excersie... axercise....
     
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