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Stickers?

Discussion in 'Milling & Saw Mills' started by alleyyooper, Dec 31, 2018.

  1. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I do not have any place to stack fresh cut boards. thought about laying down some small logs to stack on. How far apart? Then the stickers, how far apart? I can tarp ther stack once it is finished.

    :D Al
     
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  2. Franny K

    Franny K xyz

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    Make a pallet or section of floor joists support as needed.
    Sticker 24" +-. Do not tarp to ground. Rubber roofing is superior, space off at top. Mouse house likely. Do not go too wide.
     
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  3. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Thanks, I 'll see what I can do.

    :D Al
     
  4. BigOakAdot

    BigOakAdot ArboristSite newb

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    I can’t agree more when it comes to “mouse house” lol. I’ve had every small critter imaginable make a home underneath the roof of my stacks.
     
  5. Bmac

    Bmac ArboristSite Member

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    I use blocks, 4x4 timbers and 6-7 2x4s in a crosshatch alignment to get my stack well off the ground. Air flow is key so I would caution against tarping. Not enough air flow equals mold. Stickers should be dry and not wet, spaced around 20" apart, you could go wider with thicker timbers. You need weight on top of you wood also to help keep your boards flat as they dry.

    Here are a few photos to show you what I mean;
    This type of stack works well, alot of air flow, well off the ground and the pile is weighed down by the waste slabs from milling. One issue I had with these pile is too much sun. Where the sun hit the wood I got some checking.
    lumber 1.JPG

    Here's a pile I'm putting together now; This area gets good air flow and is shaded in the summer.
    milling 28.jpg

    To deal with the sun on the wood I've started to use fabric that allows air to flow through it but shades the wood. The fabric is the same stuff that goes on fences, esp athletic fences. I maintain the air flow but get the shade. I only placed the fabric on the part of the pile that the sun hits. Tarping eliminates air flow so I would avoid that;
    milling 2.jpg

    Hope this was helpful.
     
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  6. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Thanks, pictures sure explain it to my muddled brain.

    :D Al
     
  7. Sawyer Rob

    Sawyer Rob Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I like to get my stacks up off the ground,

    [​IMG]

    I use cement blocks with rail road ties (or equivalent that I saw out) across them, leveled up, no more than 4' apart with thickest lumber on the bottom and my stacks are 4' wide.

    My stickers are no LESS than 3/4" square or MORE than 1" square, and I never let the cover block any air to the sides.

    Keeping the rain and sun off the stack is important, and putting something heavy on top is a "good thing"...

    SR
     
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