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Stihl MS 462 C-M

Discussion in 'Milling & Saw Mills' started by Hydestone, Jun 26, 2019.

  1. Hydestone

    Hydestone ArboristSite Member

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    I am looking at getting a Stihl MS-462 as my main saw for tree cutting, firewood processing, and some hobby milling.

    Wondering what type of production I can get out of it for milling. The recommended max bar length is 28". Would this be able to plow through an eastern white pine if I occasionally put a longer bar on it?
     
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  2. cuinrearview

    cuinrearview Red saw lover

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    I ran a 462 last fall and thought it was a nice saw. Very light and great power bucking hard wood with a 28" bar. At this point in it's life cycle I would be hesitant to recommend it even for occasional milling. It would probably perform the task fine, but we don't know yet how it will hold up long term. Milling is as hard as it gets on a saw. "Light" and "durable" usually aren't used together to describe a product. For 462 money there are better choices.
     
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  3. Hydestone

    Hydestone ArboristSite Member

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    Appreciate the feedback.

    What else would you recommend?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  4. Hydestone

    Hydestone ArboristSite Member

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    Looking to stay in the Stihl lineup, due to potential discount on a new saw.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  5. cuinrearview

    cuinrearview Red saw lover

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    I would want 90ccs at a minimum on a mill. A 390xp can be found cheaper than a 462 if you look around. Bigger saws can be found for even less on the used market. If you were patient you could probably find two used(60-70cc, 90+cc) saws for close to the same money that would be better suited for the tasks you're describing.
     
  6. foeke

    foeke ArboristSite Operative

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    Only the 880 is a current contender.
    661 is like the 462 a great saw, but not for milling.
    You need a truck, not a sportscar.
    Other older big chunk of metal types will do.
    090/080 anything with a lot of cc's and parts availability.
    Having a cheap good running older saw makes sense, since it will wear out a lot faster anyway.
    And since it held up so far in life. . .
    This is only my advice for milling. For the rest, enjoy the lovely AV springs and power to weight of the latest and greatest.
    Just as an example, if you'll mill occasionally it will probably hold for years. But if you don't it might hold a lifetime.

    Verstuurd vanaf mijn SM-G955F met Tapatalk
     
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  7. andy at clover

    andy at clover Woods!

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    It seems like it should be ok to use the 462 for occasional milling.
    You’ll likely fall in with a long line of people who tried milling with a smaller saw only to eventually buy a 100cc beast.
    You probably won’t kill the saw trying.... just be ready for likely disappointment.
     
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  8. rarefish383

    rarefish383 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    Production and chainsaw mills don't go in the same sentence either. White Pine mills easy, but still not fast. The fastest wood I've milled was Dawn Redwood.
     
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  9. Hydestone

    Hydestone ArboristSite Member

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    I might be able pick up a new 462 with bar for $700. Seems like at that price, it’s worth giving it a shot. I’m mailing one for a few select projects...posts and beams for small shed, some boards for pine bureaus, shelving etc. not looking to mill up thousands of board feet. I’ve got too many other hobbies and kids to spend a lot of time milling!


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  10. drf255

    drf255 BAD CAD

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    As said above, you need the biggest saw you can afford. Not saying you haven’t, but until you actually mill, you won’t understand how slow and difficult it will be.

    $700 for a new 462 with bar is absurdly cheap. I’d jump on that deal and get another saw for milling.

    The M-tronic system doesn’t tolerate higher oil ratios well. It can make the saw run funny and can actually lean the saw out from the computer not being able to compensate for the increased viscosity of the mix. I had it happen with a ported MS261CM with Motul800 at 32:1. If it occurred while milling, I would have not heard it and smoked the piston. I usually run 24:1 for milling with a 36” bar.

    Milling is the only place where you do need the biggest saw. As said above, a truck and not a sports car. The best affordable milling saw for any real use is a Husky 395, and that’s coming from a staunch Stihl aficionado. They have better oilers and an outboard clutch that keeps heat away from the PTO bearing and seal. You can buy an adapter to run a Stihl bar on one, but I’m pretty sure you need a few extra DL on the chain for the swap. Do a muffler mod, DO NOT get it Ported, and run higher than normal oil ratio with the saw set rich.
     
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  11. cuinrearview

    cuinrearview Red saw lover

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    Quoted, screen shotted, time stamped, and saved for future advice giving:laughing:.

    All kidding aside, great advice here.
     
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  12. SeMoTony

    SeMoTony Addicted to ArboristSite

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    On a completely different saw. Not really just a ported, muff-modded 661 run about 40:1 fuel to oil. 1st time of day, starting on choke & letting it run for a minute ,without touching the throttle, stopping the motor and setting on the support. Fires right up and runs like a raped ape milling maple with 60" bar semiskip chisel. Allowing the internal system to adjust to this new day works like a champ IMHO. Milling is hot enough work for the PH that advancing timing is a destructive thing to do.
    Oh yeah forgot my 460 that wears a 60" cannon in my avvatar, slow but it worked at the right (slo) feed
    Enjoy milling safely
     
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  13. rarefish383

    rarefish383 Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I've been running chainsaws since 16:1 was standard. I have several saws I use to mill, 2 Homelite Super 1050's, one with a 45" bar and one with a 36". Then a few years ago I bought a new 660 to give the old Homelites a break. The 660 is running a 36" bar also. I run every saw I own on Stihl Synthetic at 4.5 gallons of gas to 1 bottle of SS oil for 5 gallons. Never felt the urge to figure it out exactly, but guess it's between 45 and 50:1. I'm not some weekend warrior that uses a pint of true fuel a summer, I go through 5+ gallons of mix a month. I try to keep 15 or so of the 40+ saws that I have running, most from the late 60's to mid 70's. a few from the 50's. With the oil technology of today, why do you run 24:1. Not criticizing, just asking. I'm just at a point I'll never keep five jugs of different ratios because that's what a saw called for 50 years ago.
     
  14. BobL

    BobL No longer addicted to AS

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    I agree with Rarefish. Sorry if I have harped on this once or twice in previous posts but running oil rich mixes is also not good for the operator either. I think of myself as bit of a canary in the coal mine as I become decidedly unwell if I mill at 25:1 especially if there's no breeze around to blow the exhaust away from me while I'm milling. More is not always better, sometimes less works just as well. Plus it greases up my clothes, skin and hair for no good reason.
     
  15. drf255

    drf255 BAD CAD

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    I run 24:1 for the dumbest reason ever, that’s what I was told to do from some people that I trust and know more than I do.

    I use an oil that doesn’t really burn so well, so it’s there to keep everything lubed up.

    Perhaps it’s a waste, but it has worked for me. I can’t see what it hurts.
     
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  16. foeke

    foeke ArboristSite Operative

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    Well,. . it oil burns hotter than gas, and it leaves sud which damages the sparkplug, and cilinderlining.
    And clogs up the exhaust and sparkarrestor.
    If every manual says 1:50 even when the Manufactorer sells the said oil, it might be best to listen to the manual.
    For milling, I can imagen the manufactor giving different advise. Even lowering the ratio.

    But then again, I read this site for quite some years and have seen advices go from 1:25 to 1:100 (mostly the more oil is better aproach).
    And most already using their favorite mix and flavor before the steam engine and never having a single failure.
    So maybe, it doesn't matter that much.

    Verstuurd vanaf mijn SM-G955F met Tapatalk
     
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  17. Mad Professor

    Mad Professor Addicted to ArboristSite

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    I'd look for a good used 066/660 if you want to go stihl. Add a dual port muffler. These are totally tuneable, easy to work on, and parts available galore. Stick with saws that have OEM parts.

    You can get setups for using stihl PMX picco/lopro chain for these saws. Nice smooth finish and narrow kerf. I've been using this chain for > 20 years now. It plows through white pine. Left coast supplies has the best deal on bar/chain setups. Otherwise logosol has a monopoly on the chain in the USA

    You can switch out bars with your other 3003 mount saws if the need arises. Not so with the bigger stihls. And the 066 saws are not too huge for bucking/felling.
     
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